Transitioning to Thumb button? Confidence builders?

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Bmoore

Bmoore

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Joined
Oct 20, 2019
Messages
95
I’ve been watching a lot of YouTube recently. I just watched a bow at video on making any thumb button into a hinge. Basically he pins his thumb against the top of the release so the button is cradled in his thumb. Then uses back pressure allowing pinky to rotate just like a hinge release which presses the button into the thumb which allows it to release. By pinning the thumb against the top of the release it’s very difficult to punch because the thumb is locked. Seems interesting and is intuitively what I had in mind as for the motion for setting a thumb button off. Anyone use this technique?
 

qwerksc

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Jan 11, 2017
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246
Location
California
I’ve been watching a lot of YouTube recently. I just watched a bow at video on making any thumb button into a hinge. Basically he pins his thumb against the top of the release so the button is cradled in his thumb. Then uses back pressure allowing pinky to rotate just like a hinge release which presses the button into the thumb which allows it to release. By pinning the thumb against the top of the release it’s very difficult to punch because the thumb is locked. Seems interesting and is intuitively what I had in mind as for the motion for setting a thumb button off. Anyone use this technique?
Close to this, get a little loop of string and play with the release, don't matter which one, play with em all. I sit and watch vids with a release in my hand always, play with anchor points, different ways of cranking it off. Geek out on this stuff, Archery is a success tool for life. Listen to the masters, they drop bombs of knowledge.
 

WCB

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2019
Messages
658
You can "punch" any release thumb, index, and yes a back tension.

You can definitely get proficient with a new release in 2 months. One thing to try if you don't like travel (i also hate any travel probably due to shooting a lot of rifles) find a thumb release where that is adjustable along with tension. set the tension heavy with no travel. this can help you pull through but not physically compute the travel and be able to time when the shot will break.

Too light of a release can cause the same mental problems as trigger travel IMO.
 

Powerman

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
Messages
36
check out www.shotiq.com this is a course taught by Joel Turner. It does cost a bit but it has helped me a lot in dealing with the same issues you are talking about. I kept changing releases and it worked for a while with each one until it didn’t. Joel goes into the reasons why and how to fix it.
 

XJGPN

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Joined
Jul 12, 2020
Messages
12
I’m probably not the best to give advice on this, but I have a spot hog wise guy, a nock2it and a silverback. I don’t really have any issues transitioning between them trigger wise... but the issue I do have is that everything on my bow was set up based on the wise guy.... and the other two just don’t hold the nock in the same position relative to my hand as it so I have trouble settling in to my anchor point with them.
 

doverpack12

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2013
Messages
2,248
I’ve been watching a lot of YouTube recently. I just watched a bow at video on making any thumb button into a hinge. Basically he pins his thumb against the top of the release so the button is cradled in his thumb. Then uses back pressure allowing pinky to rotate just like a hinge release which presses the button into the thumb which allows it to release. By pinning the thumb against the top of the release it’s very difficult to punch because the thumb is locked. Seems interesting and is intuitively what I had in mind as for the motion for setting a thumb button off. Anyone use this technique?
that is what Bowmar does and said he got it from someone else that might have had a video too. I tried it and like shooting that way. I rest my thumb against the barrel still but try to actively pull just a little more with my ring finger as I pull back. Sometimes if I just rest my thumb and pull my brain knows I’m not steady and my thumb slides around the barrel. If that happens I switch to a hinge or the Bowmar activation technique until enough time has passed that I can go back to normal. Could be a day or a week.
 

bojangles808

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2014
Messages
792
Location
hawai'i
i did the same thing this summer, tried to switch from index to a thumb in hopes of improving my shooting. I still shoot decent slapping the trigger but I know long term i need to cut that out to get better. I also focus on my pin instead of the target which I never realized was a bad deal until this year. Just taught myself, never really knew any better. well I bought a carter too simple and it hasn;t really meshed well with me. I had elbow surgery when i was 12 from a dislocation and feel like its more of a strain drawing without the aid of the wrist strap. It throws off my tune as well somehow with how I'm anchoring and pulling through, it shows when i shoot my bare shafts and fletched at 20. with the index they;ll slap together but with the thumb they're a couple inches apart. I'd need to sort that out, but when our axis deer drop their horns in the fall I'll probably give it a better chance.

My point is though that i'd give it a solid 5/6 weeks but if it's not working then don;t be afraid to go back to index for season. practice that last 2/3 weeks with whatever you feel you're going to be successful with. maybe after season give yourself more time. probably a full offseason with a hinge is really what's needed to work through it.
 
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