Trekking Poles for idiots....

TannerS

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2019
Messages
10
With constant/consistent step-ups in the stadium, I would shorten the poles slightly for the up to avoid the tripping issues and take the baskets off the tip, if they are there. The biggest challenge I have getting back on the sticks is I don't normally walk or hike with the arm movement I do when I'm running. Trekking poles require your arms to be closer to a 90 degree bend at the elbow, which isn't a normal arm position for walking.

They are definitely beneficial for training, especially with a heavy pack, plus it's good training for muscle memory in the mountains.
 

njdoxie

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2014
Messages
484
I don’t use while working out as I want it to be hard, makes the hunt seem easier.


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YouDoYou

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2018
Messages
42
Location
Kansas
Haha... same boat. Been athletic my whole life, but these poles make me wonder if i'd be better off leaving them in the truck. I probably have to agree above that we are training at a much faster pace and that is what makes it most difficult.
 

toadmeister

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2015
Messages
562
Just got back from a 11-day hike at Philmont Scout camp, NM with my son's Boy Scout troop. We did 66 miles and 6 mountain peaks.

Could NOT have done it without trekking poles! Especially the downhills which were often treacherous ankle demons from hell

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LonesomeDove

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2018
Messages
12
Location
Texas
Curious if anyone uses trekking poles in steep terrain while chukar hunting? I've wanted them before, but my hands are holding a shotgun at the ready so it would make it very difficult.
 

Okhotnik

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2018
Messages
725
Location
N ID
Curious if anyone uses trekking poles in steep terrain while chukar hunting? I've wanted them before, but my hands are holding a shotgun at the ready so it would make it very difficult.
I chukar hunt quite a bit

I use them climbing up and climbing down, shotgun on a sling on my back.I started using them after falling and breaking shotgun stock

Tough keeping balance on super steep mountain sides, where chukar hang out, loose basalt rock. Yep, have missed a few shot opportunities but have saved me from falling. I throw in pack once get up to the top where they typically hang out
 

Randonee

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2018
Messages
37
Location
WA
I find that I’m better off just using one pole unless I’m carrying a lot of weight and moving slowly. I too find using two poles is a bit awkward, especially on a narrow trail. I’ve used poles for about 3 decades on a regular basis in all types of terrain, and I try to use as few as possible (including none), given the terrain.
 

Plantedtao

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
11
I need to get back to poles... or at least a pole after tearing my patellar. It's been a year but I really need to reduce the stress on my knees even tho my legs are stronger now than they were before the injury. Knowing that you can reduce pressure on the knees up to 25% is a definite motivator.
 

ZuluSierra

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2019
Messages
16
Location
Ohio
Losing 10 lbs is roughly the equivalent of decreasing 30 lbs of axial stress on the individual knee per step. The same concept can be flipped and stated with each 10 lbs of gear/meat in your bag, your adding 30 lbs of equivalent stress on your knee per step.

Using trekking poles is essentially helping each knee share that axial stress rather than bear it individually. They’re an incredible tool and can increase the longevity of your hunt and your knee cartilage if you’re an avid backcountry hunter.
 

Jimss

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
1,164
I use trekking poles on a regular basis in super steep, rocky sheep, mtn goat, elk, and muley hunts. They are especially nice when packing meat and camp. I don't use them as often while actually hunting because the clanging on rocks can be heard for miles.....just a word of warning! In fact, a hiker with trekking poles spooked the living daylights out of a herd of rams I was stalking this year. I heard the hiker before I saw him! It took me 3/4 of a day to find the rams again!
 

ramses342

Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
Messages
73
Location
SE Alaska
I have tried them quite a bit in SE Alaska but it’s so darn thick I end up using my hands to climb half the time anyway. Next year if I do a goat hunt or something I might bring them but I really have not figured out how to use them here yet.
 

Elk Horn

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2014
Messages
11
After age 50, trekking poles are the only way to go when packing in/out a base camp or packing meat out of the mountains. They save major wear and tear on the knees and help aviod unwanted falls. Training like you hunt will help.
 

lacire

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2020
Messages
21
After age 50, trekking poles are the only way to go when packing in/out a base camp or packing meat out of the mountains. They save major wear and tear on the knees and help aviod unwanted falls. Training like you hunt will help.
My son uses a pair of Leki poles and recommended them to me. Used them this year in Mexico on a sheep hunt, now, I wouldn’t leave home without them.
 

MattyWight

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Messages
38
I never leave home without mine.

I rarely use them when I'm actually hunting but getting to and from camp (when backpacking) and especially when packing out (even for day hunting) they are always with me. The legs just feel so much better.

As said above I probably wouldnt train with them and I think they would be awkward on stairs.

They tend to be awkward for the first half day or so you use them in the hills then they just become subconscious.
 

Nossback

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Messages
11
I feel stupid every time I use them but well worth it.


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