Trekking Poles

lorneparker1

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Feb 25, 2012
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Wasnt sure where to start this thread so i figured footwear was close enough!

What is everyone using? Why? I have never used them, but am considering them.

Thanks

Lorne
 

Lawnboi

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Mar 2, 2012
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When you get em, make sure they are the ones with flick locks. I also thought msr's new poles looked pretty neat as far as the locking system and weight.

Right now iv got some twist lock leki poles, i dont even remember the model but they work well enough. having flick locks, or the bottons like on the msr poles would be convenient for setting up my shelter.
 

Soutie

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Mar 6, 2012
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Black Diamond...great for stability when carrying heavy loads over uneven terrain, and of course use for shelter.
 

Aron Snyder

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I've been using the B&D Z poles....they don't have a height adjustment, but they are very lightweight and packable.
 

Mike7

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Feb 28, 2012
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REI Traverse poles with Flick type locks. Not super light and don't pack down extremely small, but very durable and you can get them at a really good price sometimes.
 

swat8888

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Some of the anti-shock Leki's. With them weight isn't really an issue, if I'm walking they are in my hands. I also prefer the anti-shock, makes it a little easier coming downhill IMHO. Never used the flick locks, but I can say that twist locks will loosen up and that has more than once given me a good scare as I was scrambling across a scree field....NOT when you want your pole to sudden give out. Just something to keep in mind.
 

Yellowknife

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After having a couple of trekking poles fail on me when the chips were down, I've pretty much reverted back to using a well seasoned spruce staff whenever I don't have to fly commercial airline. Virtually unbreakable, infinitely adjustable length, quieter in the rocks, and still fits inside a supercub. Only about 12 oz, and you sure can't beat the price.



They are also endorsed by patriarch Moses... and I hear that guy did some serious trekking in his day. :)
 

luke moffat

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Yellowknife you get some serious style points rocking the Moses staff! :D

Black Diamond trekking poles for me.
 

Yellowknife

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Yellowknife you get some serious style points rocking the Moses staff! :D
It's also handy for parting the waters. :D



I actually doubled down in the first picture.... The rifle is a .300 H&H. It just would have been wrong to take a picture of that classic with a carbon fiber trekking pole.

Yk
 

Matt W.

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Another vote for the Black Diamond one. Really like the flicklock technology. They don't collapse and are are strong.
Staffs get the cool factor, but I do like having the ability to adjust the size on mine as stash in pack as needed.
 

Yellowknife

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I will admit that trekking poles have their perks. I just found that they broke too easy when trying to catch myself on soft scree. I do have a reputation for being able to break almost anything, so that should should be taken into account.

I also found that although having a trekking pole in each hand has it's advantages (especially going downhill), my preference is to keep one hand free and just switch back and forth as needed. With a staff, it's really easy to toss back and forth from left to right, and by having it in the hand that does the most good, I don't miss having two. I also found that I don't ever put them in my pack once I leave the trail head, so the ability to collapse is essentially wasted on me.

Where that collapsing feature does come in handy is when traveling commercially. I suppose I could try and gate check a 5 ft spruce stick, but haven't tried. :) Wonder what TSA would think of that?

I will also agree that the BD trekking poles seem to be the most durable of the lot.

Yk
 

Curtis C

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Colorado Springs, CO
I use some model of Black Diamond pole that has a push/squeeze button release for the bottom section. I really dislike the push button release but they have been very durable. I wish the darn things would break so I can get a set with the flick lock release.

C
 

luke moffat

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Feb 24, 2012
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I am usually a single trekking pole user for the most part as well. Really like having a hand free for pushing brush to the side or grabbing on to rocks and what not.
 

Ridge Ghost

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Mar 21, 2012
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Missoula, MT
Aron, what is your opinion on the durability of the Z-poles? I took a look at them at REI and they seemed to have a lot of flex to them. I really liked how light and packable they are though.
 
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