Trekking poles?

Ricenuts

Newbie
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Messages
3
Ladies and Gentlemen, I'm kind of new to hunting and kind of new to backpacking. I'm currently doing my research on a good pack (think I'm going to go exo).

But this isn't what this post is about. I've noticed all of the guys I see in the mountains with the good gear use trekking poles. So I think it's time to suck up my pride and admit I was wrong (when hiking with my wife I told her the poles are stupid and unnecessary). There are trekking poles on Amazon with great reviews for like 50 bucks. But I'm thinking with the use and abuse they're likely to endure from me with a full pack maybe I need to drop some money on a good set of sticks.

Do any of you use poles? Does it mater what ones I get? Or am I likely to be ok with the carbon fiber ones I found on amazon for 50 bucks? I havent seen any on the web sights I've been looking at packs on, what are the preferable brands? Or are there any good ones made with hunting in mind?

Thanks in advance.
 

Sportsman

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2018
Messages
118
Location
AZ
My trekking poles saved me from falling several times this year while going down rocky slopes with a heavy pack so you are right to get them. But, I have Black Diamond TLZ's and would not recommend them. They pull into three shock corded sections and fold up which is convenient but the tip would stick in the ground and then separate at a joint. I ended up using electrical tape to keep them intact. I can't speak to their telegraphing poles. I should have listened to a few reviews complaining about them separating.
 

Low_Sky

Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
94
Location
Alaska
I’m happy with my Black Diamond alpine carbon corks, but they’re spendy and I’m sure there are cheaper options out there that perform just as well (they’re just sticks after all). The Costco brand poles get recommended here a lot.

I don’t always use them when I’m on the move, but you’ll find all kinds of uses for them. I pitch my tarp with them. Combine them with other poles to make improvised meat poles. Use them as shooting sticks. And when I have a 70+ lbs pack on, you can pry them from my cold dead hands.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Topo_trekker

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2016
Messages
468
Location
Northern Colorado
Leki poles with speed locks(clamp style) are the probably the most trusted out there. Sierra trading post has some good deals on them. I would stay away from the cheap carbon poles, they’re brittle.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Jimss

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
878
I would say yes and no! I haven't ever used trekking poles when hunting on relatively flat, non-rocky terrain. I swear by using trekking poles on steep, rocky, terrain or when hauling heavy loads. Trekking poles make lots of noise so that's a consideration to keep in mind while hunting...in fact a hiker spooked the heck out of a group of rams I was hunting a few weeks ago....I could hear the clanging of the poles around 1/2 mile away! There are a few tips that you can learn to use trekking poles correctly....so possibly look some of these up on youtube.

I bought a pair of Leki's from Sierra Trading for around $40 around 15 years ago and they still work incredible. I've used and abused them on quite a few Alaska , Colo, and Wyo sheep, mtn goat, and elk hunts. ST still likely has incredible deals for about 1/2 off.....take a look at the reviews on the particular pole model you are interested in.
 
OP
R

Ricenuts

Newbie
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Messages
3
Amazon has the bd alpine carbon corks on sale for 120 right now...
 

JohnnyScranton

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
10
I’ve done a good amount of hiking with aluminum, shock absorbing poles. It’s really nice to have that shock absorbing feature but those poles are heavy for backpacking.
I recently purchased the cascade mountain tech carbon fiber poles. They have hundreds of positive reviews, hope they work well on my trip to ID this year.
 

Idaho Sandman

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
338
Search as this topic has been beaten to death.
Here is just one.
Since I’m big into snow sports I’ve owned all the high end collapsable poles as well as broken them all. Bought the Cascade Mountain tech ones a couple years ago just for hunting. Didn’t want to use a high dollar set. Couldn’t be happier. I skied with mine last season and was very impressed.
 

Azscafe

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2019
Messages
10
I have just started using trekking poles as well. I have the Cascade Mountain poles and really like them. Although I don't have anything to compare to.
 

Ndstevens

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
266
Get the Cascade Mtn poles at Costco. Can't beat the price and they are tough. A must have when packing meat.
Ill second this. I love mine. Tons of miles on them. Creek crossing, river crossing, steep climbs they become human 4wd and they have been great! Plus if your like me and your ballence is thrown off slightly their awesome for walking logs. Not something I use while actually hunting cause i want to carry my bow but the hike in and out their great. Especially with any substantial weight. As said before there have been many discussions about poles and if you look into them youll find all the info your looking for.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

RussGS

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2017
Messages
109
Location
Utah
I couldn't justify the high end trekking poles, so I went with the Mountainsmith Pinacle. $36 for 2. The trade off is these are probably on the heavy side. But they have held up well to a lot of miles.

Whichever you choose, trekking poles definitely help coming down the mountain in the dark. They help conserve your legs on ascent as well. They spread a portion of the work to your arms, and help your legs go longer. They are awesome for creek crossings when you want to rock hop.

Additional uses:
-Pitching a tarp
-Monopod-I use a tripod, but my wife and kids sometimes don't want to carry one, so the trekking pole can give some stability over free-handing binos.
-Shooting sticks-this is taught at the USMC mountain warfare training center.
-Loop the straps together with the poles crossed, resting the rifle on the interconnected straps. This video shows a different method, but either way, it can be a good shooting rest.
 
Last edited:

justinspicher

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2012
Messages
2,733
Location
Colorado
I always have mine but rarely use them. I have several other uses for them, like others have stated previously. I’d rather have and not need than the other way around.
 

AK Troutbum

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2012
Messages
4,490
Location
Chugiak, Alaska
Like what’s already been stated several times in this thread, and many more times on other threads, pick up a pair of the Cascade Mountain Techs at Costco for around $30, and use ‘em. There’s no sense in spending upwards of a couple hundred dollars on trekking poles that are probably still made in Asia, and aren’t any lighter or more durable than those Cascade’s. Use that money you saved towards a good pack, optics, shelter, or hell, even a hunt for that matter.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

WyoElk

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2014
Messages
635
Like what’s already been stated several times in this thread, and many more times on other threads, pick up a pair of the Cascade Mountain Techs at Costco for around $30, and use ‘em. There’s no sense in spending upwards of a couple hundred dollars on trekking poles that are probably still made in Asia, and aren’t any lighter or more durable than those Cascade’s. Use that money you saved towards a good pack, optics, shelter, or hell, even a hunt for that matter.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Spot on. I had the Costco poles and after my kids broke one playing in the yard I just ordered a pair of Leki poles. After receiving the leki poles I’m returning them and getting another set of the Costco sticks. I actually think they have better options and user-ability than the leki poles.

Turns out however, the Costco poles aren’t made to be used as baseball bats in the yard :)
 

SharkDog

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2019
Messages
17
Location
Denver
I will add I really like the cork grips on my ~15 year old black diamond poles. The cork is way more comfortable when your hands are sweating.
 

dla

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
138
Location
Oregon & Idaho
Ladies and Gentlemen, I'm kind of new to hunting and kind of new to backpacking. I'm currently doing my research on a good pack (think I'm going to go exo).

But this isn't what this post is about. I've noticed all of the guys I see in the mountains with the good gear use trekking poles. So I think it's time to suck up my pride and admit I was wrong (when hiking with my wife I told her the poles are stupid and unnecessary). There are trekking poles on Amazon with great reviews for like 50 bucks. But I'm thinking with the use and abuse they're likely to endure from me with a full pack maybe I need to drop some money on a good set of sticks.

Do any of you use poles? Does it mater what ones I get? Or am I likely to be ok with the carbon fiber ones I found on amazon for 50 bucks? I havent seen any on the web sights I've been looking at packs on, what are the preferable brands? Or are there any good ones made with hunting in mind?

Thanks in advance.
Hiking poles are a necessity to me. I started by spending $3 at Goodwill for X-country ski poles (last a long time). I'm tall enough that they work fine. All it takes is one misplaced step to twist an ankle, and that alone convinces most folks that hiking poles are a good investment. At least it did with me.

Usually what kills a pole for me is getting caught between rocks when descending a slope. I did have one get broken by an energetic lab. Poles can be dual use for setting up a tarp shelter.


Costco used to sell a pretty decent set of poles - ~$30.
 

Eric4

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2016
Messages
215
I'd avoid the folding style poles, and stick with a three piece flip lock for versatility. For a few seasons now, I've been using these $36 carbon poles on aliexpress, and have no complaints about them. They're one of the lightest poles I've found, and the aluminum flip locks are a nice insurance, as the plastic ones can break.

You can lash the wrist strap onto the opposite poles, and you've got a perfect rest for your rifle. I also set my binoculars on them for longer glassing sessions.
 
Top