Trekking Poles

Brandon Pattison

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Feb 25, 2012
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2,829
Location
Michigan
I have never used them, I always figured they were weak and for hippies. I want some though. I am 5'10" but have gorilla-length arms (my reach is 4" more than my height). What do I get?
 

Gman

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Feb 15, 2012
Messages
551
Location
Colorado baby!
you size them by holding at the grip (some say flip them and just under the basket). You want your arm to be parallel with the ground. the fixed lightweight BD poles are sweet but you are limited in making adjustments to length and tarp pitching. My guess, based on your height is you want something in the 125cm range.
 

Matt Cashell

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Feb 25, 2012
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4,146
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Western MT
Get some good adjustable poles. You might want them a little longer or shorter if you are on long climbs or descents. I have seen some smokin deals on Steepandcheap.com lately.

I use REI brand poles, but they are all pretty good. Some are twist lock and some have levers, whatever your preference.

The carbon ones feel like they weigh nothing.
 

AK Troutbum

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Apr 22, 2012
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5,839
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Chugiak, Alaska
Adjustable, flip-lock (not twist lock) is what I would recommend. Adjustables are nice because you want them longer when going down steep stuff, shorter when going up, and if side hilling, one short and one long. The flip-locks because they lock down much better and don't slip, the twist locks have a tendency to slip when under pressure (and when you need them most).
 

Ross

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Feb 24, 2012
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Liberty Lake, WA
I've been using my new Black Diamond Zpoles the last few weeks shed hunting. Coming in at 9oz and condensing down to 15 inches these poles are an awesome piece of equipment. They dont slid down, but fold down. From what i have seen so far, they can take the abuse, pack extremely nice when not in use and though pricey they sure take the punishment off the knees. I would check them out.
 

luke moffat

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Joined
Feb 24, 2012
Messages
4
I use Black Diamond 140 cm ones even though I usually run them at 120 cms. I would think 140 cms would be more than enough for you to use. I just use the 140 Cm length when putting them up as the center pole for my tall shelters.
 

keep

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Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
219
Location
Springtown, TX
I was told to get one pole, which I did, a Leki Wanderfreund. Are 2 poles better? Is this particular pole I bought good, I was told for coming down heavy it was a great option.
 

aggieland

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Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
854
Location
N.E. Texas....
I will tell you two poles are better than one and poles save your Ass a lot of work. Last year my dad thought we were crazy to use them but I had an extra set and told him to try them on this pack in hunt.. When we got back down the mountain he said he would never go back without them!
 

>>>---WW---->

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2012
Messages
113
Nice thing about trekking poles is that you can fold them up when not in use. Other than that, I don't trust them. I use a carbon shaft hockey stick. It will bare all the weight you want to put on it. Great for getting over downfall for even vaulting streams. Downside is you can't fold it up and put it in your pack.
 

TooFarEast

Junior Member
Joined
May 2, 2012
Messages
42
Location
Carolina Coast
I am also looking into trekking poles for a backpack elk hunt this year and have a couple questions...

How important is having "Anti-Shock" poles?

Also, I am looking for some poles to double as a centerpole for a small tipi or tarp set up. If I use a Ti goat type wood stove next to the center pole, do you guys think the heat will affect the trekking pole? Just don't want any plastic pieces or grips to melt. Most of these stove pipes are recommended to be close to the center pole, so that is why it is a concern. Does anyone have experience with this?

Thanks in advance
 

rye_a

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2012
Messages
276
Location
Colorado
I am also looking into trekking poles for a backpack elk hunt this year and have a couple questions...

How important is having "Anti-Shock" poles?

Also, I am looking for some poles to double as a centerpole for a small tipi or tarp set up. If I use a Ti goat type wood stove next to the center pole, do you guys think the heat will affect the trekking pole? Just don't want any plastic pieces or grips to melt. Most of these stove pipes are recommended to be close to the center pole, so that is why it is a concern. Does anyone have experience with this?

Thanks in advance

I know I'm not a hippie and don't think I'm a wimp, but on long hikes with a heavy load and lots of vertical I think that trekking poles are worth their weight in gold.

I use Komperdell trekking poles with anti-shock, but I don't think that anti-shock is all that important. You don't need to go nuts on price, and Sierra Trading Post has some great poles at low prices, especially if you use their coupon codes.

Here's a link to the trekking poles: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/s~trekking-poles/?perPage=24

and I got an e-mail with a 35% off code this morning: eb050812A.
 
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