Tricks to lighten up a mountain rifle???

bbrown

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I have a Weatherby Vangard in 300 win, synthetic stock and stainless topped with a Burris Fullfield II 4.5-14x 42mm scope. I absolutley love this rifle but would also like to put it on a diet without spending a fortune (I know, I know - I want my cake and to eat too....)
Anyone have any creative ways to shave some ounces without a gunsmith?
 

HellsCanyon

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I have a Weatherby Vangard in 300 win, synthetic stock and stainless topped with a Burris Fullfield II 4.5-14x 42mm scope. I absolutley love this rifle but would also like to put it on a diet without spending a fortune (I know, I know - I want my cake and to eat too....)
Anyone have any creative ways to shave some ounces without a gunsmith?
Shoot lighter bullets.... ;)
But seriously cutting weight can be as simple as swapping to a light weight stock, or selecting optics and mounting system with weight in mind. However if you don't want to go to a smith I'd say swap stocks! There are some light weight stocks out there that come in around 20 oz which I'm sure will be a big improvement. Best of luck!

Mike
 

belly-deep

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Your scope weighs a ton. Swap it out for a Leupold 2.5-8x36 and then get a top-quality synthetic stock.
 
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bbrown

bbrown

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Thanks guys
I know the scope is heavy but I really like the extra magnification, bigger objective and Burris has always treated me right - not that Leupold hasen't. I will check into the stock - had not really thought of that since it already had the syntetic.
 

swat8888

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I agree with the scope, I use the Leupold ultra-light....works just fine for the distances I plan on shooting <400yds. Cheapest ways to lighten up without messing with the gun is to get a super light sling...I just use a nylon strap, very thin...or go without a sling. Don't attach a bipod. I've never really looked at getting a new stock but the options for getting any type of fluting or metal shaving off the bolt handle were way too expensive for cost per ounce of savings. I've found much easier ways to shave weight in my pack.
 

Matt Cashell

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These guys have nailed it. Your scope if the fat part. I have a Vortex Viper 2-7X32 BDC on my mountain rifle, and find it's magnification more than adequate for shooting, even at longish ranges.

If you like your scope, I know Burris makes a 2-7X35 that is around 12 ounces.

Talley one-piece lightweight ring/mounts would save you a few more ounces.

It depends on what stock you have already, but as stated before, you could probably trim a little there.

One thing to remember, as the rifle weight goes down, recoil goes up.
 

broncoformudv

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Lop a few inches off the barrel as well, cheap and takes some ounces off. This will also help make the rifle balance better when you go to a lighter stock
 

Becca

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Scope, rings, bases, aluminum firing pin and housing, flutting, and the easiest is an McMillan Edge stock.
We lightened up my Remington model 7 in .308 with both bolt fluting and a McMillan Edge Stock. The McMillian Edge dropped the rifles weight by 12 oz (original stock is 36 oz the MCM Edge is 24 oz both with limbsaver pads and sling studs), and an added bonus was that they could customize the LOP, shortening it so it it fits me me perfectly.

I forget what the final weight savings were on the fluting, but it looks awesome and I swear it makes the bolt run smoother too.
"Before" pic with the original stock and bolt:


"After", with the Edge stock and fluting:





A cheap and easy way to drop weighht is to ditch your sling. My rifle spends the majority of the time on my pack with the corral gunslinger, and usually only comes off when on a final stalk. We removed the heavy padded sling I had been using, and added standard key rings, and then ran 1" webbing straps with plastic clips thru them. Super lite, and then you still have a sling if you need one in a pinch.
 

HellsCanyon

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FOUND IT! I did a bunch of parts weighing the other week and found my spec sheet... As you can see its pretty hard to save weight with bases/rings. I think fluting the bolt and going with a different stock is going to be your best bet for cutting down weight (besides swapping scopes, but thats one area that you'll actually give up performance for weight savings depending on you hunting style).

A Seekins Precision 1 piece 20MOA base for a Rem 700 LA weighs: 2 oz.
Seekins Precision 30MM scope rings (you won't find nicer nor tougher rings, guarantee): 4 oz.
Factory REM 700 BDL bottom metal: 6 oz.
Factory Rem 700 Trigger: 4.5 oz.

Obviously this is all based off a Rem 700 build and your numbers will be different, but this should give you an idea of what each component will ballpark at. I'm using a factory HS Precision PSS stock that weighs in at 39 ounces after a skim bedding! I would drop more than 1 LB if I swapped to the McMillan Edge stock...

Mike
 
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bbrown

bbrown

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Becca - that fluting looks sweet. I might have to look into that.

So basically I am looking around $400 for the McMillan Stock to save around 12 oz (total guess) and around $400 for the Leupy VX3 2.5-8x that should be about 7oz less than the Burris. Then I might as well dig into the ring and bases so there is another $100 or so. Granted I could probably resell the Burris for something..
Long story short I would be in it for almost a grand (prolly more in the end) to save 18-20 oz - not sure its worth that (especially considering it already kicks like a mule).
I have a awesome little Remington 700 in .243 that shoots lights out - might be a much better candidate for some weight savings.

Thanks for the insight everyone.
 
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bbrown

bbrown

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Actually, just looked at McMillans website and I don't think they even make a stock for the Vangard unless I missed it.
 

HellsCanyon

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Actually, just looked at McMillans website and I don't think they even make a stock for the Vangard unless I missed it.
You maybe correct, but I'm pretty sure you can get them to custom inlet somethin for you. Though now you're talking big money!

Mike
 

RosinBag

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I would be cautious about making your rifle lighter to some degree. .300's will generally shoot better when of moderate to heavier gross weight. This keeps the felt recoil down and allows you back on your scope quicker. If you lighten it up a lot, I would look into a heavier bullet to compensate for what you took out of it. That heavier bullet will assist with keeping the recoil more manageable with the lighter gross weight.

If you like how your rifle and bullet combination shoots right now and I wouldn't touch it. Changing things up will ultimately change how it performs. It may be better, but it may be worse also. It is pretty close to hunting season for rifle guys and I would conduct this experiment after the season. I would try and cut a pound out of your other gear and stick with what you got if it performs well for you.

Just my two cents though....
 
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bbrown

bbrown

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Rosinbag - you make some very good points and I was not planning on messing with it before my upcoming hunt. Actually the more I thought about it the more I realized that trying to build a light weight 300 is almost guaranteed to be a bad idea especially on my budget.
Thanks
 

2rocky

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bbrown, It would seem to me that a non belted, flat shooting cartridge like a .270 or .30-06, or .308 would be best suited to a lightweight mountain rifle build. My daughter has a Remington 7mm-08 with a short barrel that I'd consider a lightweight stock on before my .300 Win Mag.
 

fillthefreezer

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i have a lightweight .300, 110oz with the scope. i DO NOT like shooting it although it shoots very well and is a dream to pack. i would probably go with a lighter caliber if i were to do it again although if you look at my gun fleet i am kind of a recoil junky..
 
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