Trinity Alps Backcountry Archery

tgillespie

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2019
Messages
28
There will be people. Go far. Have good glass. Find a trailhead that isn’t mentioned on a forum or popular hiking website. Lookout for cats!
 
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Jstolte

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Apr 20, 2020
Messages
22
There will be people. Go far. Have good glass. Find a trailhead that isn’t mentioned on a forum or popular hiking website. Lookout for cats!
Thanks. I’ve been scouring google earth and OnX. As someone else suggested, my plan is to stay away from the popular lakes. Trying to pick a trailhead is tough as the sheer size is pretty overwhelming. I’ll be heading out to do some scouting late May/early June.
 

tgillespie

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2019
Messages
28
I would pack a side arm. Went with my gf to a remote spot that wasn’t often visited, had a cat walk within 20 ft of camp while sitting around the camp fire.
 

TGLBRH

Member
Joined
May 2, 2020
Messages
69
I have done 3-4 archery trips into the Alps, each time picking a different trailhead. Absolutley, 100 percent, the harder and longer the trail, the less people you will find.

My first trip was into boulder lakes areas. I saw plenty of deer sign and a few smaller bucks but the amount of hikers I saw were way more than any hunter wants to see. That was also about as easy of trail you could pick.

I agree 100 percent to grab a bear tag, but dont ruin your "deer" hunt just to get an easy bear. There are plenty of bear in the state to choose from.

You might look into the Yollo Bolly Wilderness as well. While not as beautiful, the genetics in some of those areas are amazing. Also likely to see less people depending on the area. I have done 4-5 day trips and never seen another person...not even parked at the trailhead.

Almost had a chance to let an arrow loose on this guy last season! 100 yards was as close as I got before it got dark on my last evening of the hunt. I'll be back this year to that area.
 

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Ihatecrashing

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2019
Messages
34
The Alps is one of my all time favorite places. I hike, backpack and cruise the area every chance I get. Last year was my first year hunting and I was extremely fortunate to fill my tag with a nice 4 point buck. RB is absolutely right, the further you go, the fewer people you will see! The Alps seem to reward your effort accordingly. The harder you work, the greater the reward, with solitude and beauty.

It's a special place for sure, I want to fill my tags, but even if it turns into a long camping trip with my bow I will still return home happy!
 

mxgsfmdpx

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2019
Messages
1,420
Location
Central Arizona
I’d recommend heading in 3 days early for some scouting. Also preseason scouting is really important if you have some time for that. Going in a few days early let’s you get deeper into the wilderness which serves you well for such a popular hunting and hiking area. I also like to get my eyes re-acclimated to the area and my lungs fully acclimated for long hiking days at altitude. This also lets me check in on the bucks I’ve scouted the weeks before, or if I need to improvise and move to a new location. I realize a lot of hunters are not fans of “wasting days” being in the backcountry when they can’t take an animal yet. I respect that opinion for sure, but what works for me has worked, so I stick with it.

Depending on weather you will see lots of bears, try to hold off on that tag and keep your focus on deer. Once you loose the arrow on a bear up there that’s your hunting trip.

Are you able to head out for some scouting preseason?
 

lifeisgoodsteve

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2018
Messages
224
Location
Bitterroot Valley, MT
I was just up there a few days for the first time. Gorgeous country indeed! What struck me was how heavily forested it was. The open areas still had what looked like 6’+ manzanitas or other brush which gave the impression glassing would be tough.

Are most of the Alps like that or in general are there better glassing spots further up away from trailheads?

cheers
 

Beendare

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Joined
May 6, 2014
Messages
6,545
Location
In Traffic
It might be a good idea to de badge your rig so it doesn't get vandalized at the popular TH's. Lots of antis and animal rights folks from the Bay Area up there in archery seasons.

We parked my buddies land cruiser at a TH for an archery backpack hunt years ago and some antis from Berkeley smeared a concoction of tomato sauce spelling "Killers" on the hood that ate into the paint since we weren't back for 5 days. The truck needed to be completely repainted. Long story but Witnesses...then tracked them to Berkeley, The sheriff refused to prosecute.

_______
 
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Ihatecrashing

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2019
Messages
34
I was just up there a few days for the first time. Gorgeous country indeed! What struck me was how heavily forested it was. The open areas still had what looked like 6’+ manzanitas or other brush which gave the impression glassing would be tough.

Are most of the Alps like that or in general are there better glassing spots further up away from trailheads?

cheers
How far in did you hike? Climb up in altitude and the alps open up.
 

RosinBag

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Staff member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
3,087
Location
Roseville, CA.
You need to get above the thick timber for archery hunting. You also need to get away from lakes if possible as it will get the majority of hunters and hikers. I was just up in the Alps for four days, 9.5 miles in and never saw another person after about mile four. You should look for country like this.... IMG_7804.jpeg IMG_7803.jpeg
 

lifeisgoodsteve

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2018
Messages
224
Location
Bitterroot Valley, MT
You need to get above the thick timber for archery hunting. You also need to get away from lakes if possible as it will get the majority of hunters and hikers. I was just up in the Alps for four days, 9.5 miles in and never saw another person after about mile four. You should look for country like this.... View attachment 186465 View attachment 186466

Looks awesome for beauty and for deer. Thanks.
 

JNDEER

Senior Member
Joined
May 2, 2012
Messages
1,207
CCRT14-354 (h) clearly says that during archery season you may not posses a fire arm and if you have an AO tag you may not posses a fire arm either. Just wanted to clarify.


Good pics Rosin... you holding out posting a pic of the big one?
 

MeatBuck

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2018
Messages
783
Location
woodpile, Commiefornia
Go in with a bear tag and if the opportunity arises, do the deer a favor. Dont be afraid to fill your freezer with meat even if the quarry isn't packing fuzzy antlers.
We all bitch about how bad bears are for the deer population yet we have guys here almost advising against taking one while deer hunting. Doesn't make a lot of sense to me especially since the amount of meat you get from a bear can easily double that of a blacktail.
And yes your hunt will (and should) be over when you harvest an animal of any kind. Meat becomes first priority and since I'm certain that you cannot pack both a bear and a deer out from 7-9 miles deep without multiple packers or multiple grueling trips there's no reason to continue hunting after the first harvest. That should go without saying yet here I am saying it.

Get your boots on the ground and good luck. I hope your freezer space is limited after the season.
 
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