Unconventional grip positions

WesternHunter

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How many of you have to grip your bows different than the typical recommended grip to get it to paper tune or shoot broadheads with field tips???

I can not get rid of a right tear shooting through paper at various ranges no matter what I try. Subsequently shooting fixed blades I'm impacting left of my field points. I have moved the rest multiple times, even over exaggerating moves at times just to see what it would do, shot different releases, string pressures with my face, multiple different shops tuning the bows, and now I have two different bows all confirming the same thing... something about my grip and the way I pull through the shot is causing torque.

The only time I can get the bow to shoot close to bullet holes through paper, I am burying my hand much deeper into the grip than is recommended, crossing the center line of my hand, and shooting more of a pistol grip hold on the bow. It feels awkward to shoot this way and brings my forearm dangerously close to getting smacked by the string, BUT if that's what it takes to shoot torque free I'm willing to relearn my grip.

Anyone have a similar experience? Am I barking up the wrong tree and just have arrows that aren't built correctly?

Bow #1 specs
Prime Rival Long Draw set at 70lbs, 31" draw, 85% let off
QAD drop away arrow rest
Beestinger 10.8 set up
Tightspot 5 arrow quiver
Black Gold ascent 3 pin sight
GT pierce 250 spine arrows around 503 grains finished out with 100 grain tips, standard insert/outsert with collar, 50 grain FACT weights in the back of insert, and AAE Max stealth vanes. Rough arrow length valley of nock to end of Carbon 30.5-30.25
GT pro hunter 300 spines with similar set up finishing around 480 grains

Bow #2 specs
Mathews Traverse set to 31", 70 lbs, 75% let off
Ripcord Drop away
Spot Hogg Fast Eddie XL double pin sight
haven't settled on stabilizer and quiver set up yet
same arrows

sorry for the diatribe....
 

Billy Goat

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Have you tried shooting a bow with a shorter draw length?

I'd just be curious to see what happens if you picked up someone else's bow that was say 29". Just to make sure it is in your grip. Might be in your shoulder positioning from the draw length.

Are you a right or left handed shooter?
 
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WesternHunter

WesternHunter

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Right handed shooter. I can't say that I've ever grabbed another bow with a shorter draw and shot through paper. I've been measured a handful of times and feel like my draw length is correct but with the new grip position I did consider the draw length question as it would put a little more bend in my elbow and take that string out away from my arm.
Forward shoulder is in a comfortable low position most of the time I feel. Anytime my shoulder gets uncomfortable is if I'm shooting my hinge and holding too long and that front shoulder begins to collapse a bit. How do you think the shoulder position changes the torque?
 

bsnedeker

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have you ever tried this technique:

Jump to about 3 minutes into the video. This was a game-changer for me.
 
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WesternHunter

WesternHunter

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I haven't watched this particular video before, he does a great job, but I have watched many many others discussing the same thing. When I'm in the "good" area of the hand, relaxed grip, that's when I'm getting the wrong tears. It's only been after crossing that life line into the "bad" area that I've been able to shoot bullet holes.

If my grip has been fine and it's more of a pressure thing then I'd say I put too much pressure into the thumb side of grip and that may be causing torque, but I don't know how to not put pressure against the riser where that's where I'm pushing against to hold the bow at draw.
 

Wapiti1

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It is entirely possible your hand/wrist don't jive with that bow. You could try a wedge spacer made of wood, or plastic and tape it to the grip to change the angle. At least as a test. If it works, there are grip wedges you can buy or use moldable epoxy.

Then again, maybe it is just a recommendation and you need to shoot the way you shoot.

Bows are made for the average shooter. Not everyone is average. I'm well below as an example.

Jeremy
 

Billy Goat

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Right handed shooter. I can't say that I've ever grabbed another bow with a shorter draw and shot through paper. I've been measured a handful of times and feel like my draw length is correct but with the new grip position I did consider the draw length question as it would put a little more bend in my elbow and take that string out away from my arm.
Forward shoulder is in a comfortable low position most of the time I feel. Anytime my shoulder gets uncomfortable is if I'm shooting my hinge and holding too long and that front shoulder begins to collapse a bit. How do you think the shoulder position changes the torque?


When I said shoulder position it was more about how your arm and shoulder are positioned, but if your shoulder and arm are locked it's likely going to cause you to pitch the bow versus an unlocked arm and shoulder. You definitely want a little bit of bend in your elbow.

I'd be curious if you laid your two bows on top of each other and lined up the risers if you can see a difference in grip angles. Might be the same grip angle and it's one that doesn't work for you, as previously said.

Arrows seem fine for your setup. I'm assuming you are positive you aren't getting any fletching contact? You are shooting multiple broadheads? Not relying on a single practice point or arrow?
 
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WesternHunter

WesternHunter

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As far as I know there are no issues with fletching contact. I’ve shot multiple different broadheads and get a further left hit on the less aerodynamic models.

This is something I struggled with all year last year with my Prime. HaventJust picked up the Mathews and am hoping to help solve the issue with it but initial shots through paper at the archery shop showed the same right tear. Shooting bullets from a hooter shooter but not for my hand.

I will have to compare them side by side and see if I can pick out any differences on grips. I will have to try to shim the rival grip as mentioned by Wapiti1 also. It’ll be interesting to see what that does.

Thanks to all for the suggestions. Keep em coming!
 

MattB

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Sep 29, 2012
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I have a funny grip. Some of the new Hoyts have an adjustable plate under the grip to account for hand position, and I couldn't get mine to shoot a bullet until I made an adjustment to that plate. Then bullets....
 

Zac

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Some people have issues with the stock Mathews grips. I would probably give the side plates a try. Not really very familiar with Prime grips.
 

5MilesBack

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For me, the thin grips will give the most inconsistency with a "normal textbook" 45 degree knuckle slant grip. And I can see that shot to shot to shot with a bare shaft. So on thin grips I use a more vertical hand position and wrap my fingers......loosely or tightly doesn't make much of a difference.......bare shafts will stack together. And then I tune my setup for that because that's the most consistent way for me to shoot those bows.......especially in hunting situations. And absolute consistency is key with BH's and hunting.

With the giant flattish back grip that's on my Bowtech, I can grip it anyway I want and it's consistent but I normally use the textbook grip with that one.
 

Arctic Hunter

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Aug 6, 2016
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Primes I've owned were notorious for a right tear. Set your centershot at 7/8 or whatever they recommend. Adjust the flexis cable rod to see if that will make a difference, though I’ve found it to make little if any difference for me.

They do like a weak spine though In my experience, so you might try leaving you arrow a little long. You can always cut it down if it doesn’t fix it. That seemed to help the most.

I have known people to have custom shims made to adjust the cam over, which they said fixed the issue. You might try building the grip up on the passenger side to change the position of your hand.

I owned three primes in the last three years. But I got away from them due to this issue. I prefer to be able to shim cams or yoke tune if necessary
 

tsm213

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Feb 20, 2020
Messages
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I shoot as close to a conventional grip position is I can. I’ve had a few wrist injuries and don’t have great range of motion. I have to shim cams or twist yokes more than what I’d say is normal on every bow I’ve owed. I just know that and don’t get hung up on doing that. I always have very consistent groups after.
The Bowtech grip has been the best for me so far. You can buy the different inserts if you need.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Tock-O

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Feb 2, 2020
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Old thread... But I have something that might be of interest.

I found out this year that the release used can have a large impact on timing and zeroing. I was using a caliper style release and had it times and zeroed perfectly. I bought the trufire hardcore release, which is the hook type, and then started having tuning issues and a constant poi to the left which drove me crazy for a couple months. I went back to the caliper style release and the problem was solved!
 
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