Victorinox sheep skinner/ lamb skinner

Catchfish

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2019
Messages
20
I wanted to try out a lamb/ sheep skinner blade shape this year so I purchased the victorinox blade in both sizes. I’m having problems finding sheaths for them, does anybody use these knives and have a sheath they like or have any ideas.
 

PantherCity

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2016
Messages
486
Location
Fort Worth, TX
I think it;s worth it to buy a Kydex rivet tool and some kydex. I've made a bunch of holsters and sheath and its fun hobby/goot skill to have. All you need is an oven, some foam. a board, tin snips, sandpaper and a rivet tool.

https://www.knifekits.com/vcom/ckk-riveteyelet-flaring-die-guide-journeyman-series-p-2029.html

and this:

https://www.knifekits.com/vcom/ckk-riveteyelet-flaring-dies-journeyman-series-p-2028.html

some of these:

https://www.knifekits.com/vcom/eyelets-black-finish-for-125-kydexholstex-pack-p-5260.html

kydex you can get lots of places in any color you want.

for knives I use .060" and holsters I use .080"
 

coop22250

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
687
Location
Palmer AK
My dad made some out of leather and I made some out of kydex.

On knifemerchant.com they have a dexter leather sheath that will fit any 6” blade for $7, doesn’t have a snap so you may want to attach one. They also have the 6” boning knife and sheath for $25.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
OP
C

Catchfish

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2019
Messages
20
I’ve looked at that sheath I thought the curve of the blade would be to much i was surprised I couldn’t find anything on victorinoxs’ website.
 
OP
C

Catchfish

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2019
Messages
20
I may have to look up the kydex projects, I hadn’t thought of it but it does sound pretty simple.
 

coop22250

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
687
Location
Palmer AK
Also YouTube search 22 casings as rivets, easy to do. No special tools needed


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
OP
C

Catchfish

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2019
Messages
20
I will definitely be bringing animals to the knives. But I would like to use one in the field if the opportunity arises as far as having a moose down. I will not experiment with one with a backpack hunt but moose hunting I should have the ability to pack an extra knife.
 

MtnCam

Junior Member
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
18
Location
Too far from the mountains
For bringing the animals to the knife we use a standard plastic or metal butcher scabbard to hold our skinning, boning knives and have our steels hanging from a chain. Similar to this.

https://www.knifemerchant.com/product.asp?productID=8262


For our trips in on stock we fold cardboard in half and tape it with duct tape allowing enough room for the tip and belly of the blade not to touch the cardboard. The friction from the cardboard holds the blade in place and keeps it from moving around. We then place our knives and a good steel in a thin plastic tackle box to protect the knives.

If you haven’t used these types of knives please understand they are great, until they get dull. Buy a top quality steel and have it with you. Also a lamb skinner is great for skinning but horrible at boning. Buy a good boning knife from the same company that made your lamb skinner. These knives can get sharp but will need to be run on a steel quite frequently.

If and when you sharpen your skinner on a stone, follow the edge shape as to not take the belly off the knife.

You bought a great knife that will do a great job for which it was designed. That’s why the majority of meat packing plants and butchers use them. Once you use these knives it will be hard for you to use any thing else.
 

Desk Jockey

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2015
Messages
1,891
I did an upgrade to my butcher kit this year. The victorinox knives were one of my best purchases and I like my sheep skinner. The guy above seems to know his stuff. I agree with the comment about a good boning knife. I actually ended up buying a few and use them more than any other knife for butchering.

DIY kydex is fun and easy. Before I bought a press I used some boards and wood clamps with a chopped up sleeping pad. A belt sander is greater for shaping.

If you don’t want to DIY Check these out.

https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Forschner-BladeSafe-8-Inch-10-InchKnife/dp/B000MF47B6/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1550664837&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=Knife+cover&psc=1

Or these.

https://www.amazon.com/Ergo-Chef-ER83-Universal-Multicolor/dp/B00KFODMG0/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1550664837&sr=8-5&keywords=Knife+cover

I leave my knives in the truck for the most part but when I carry them I use those ergo sleeves and a little tape to keep it from moving.
 
Last edited:
OP
C

Catchfish

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2019
Messages
20
Yeah I have a pretty good stock of victorinox boning, filet knives that I use for processing at the house. It sure is nice having them near a sharpener but I could not imagine using anything else. I liked using them so much that’s why I wanted to try the skinner blade. But as stated I planned on using it more in the field, figured the belly would be awesome for skinning, just not sure about breaking down an animal. I have some of those clear/white Victorinox cases for larger knives for storage in my drawers.

Mtncam have you had any experience breaking down an animal with the sheep or lamb skinner?
Thanks for input guys
 

coop22250

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
687
Location
Palmer AK
We are a butcher family, that’s all my dad carries in the field, sheep skinner, has a narrower blade than a beef skinner, decent curve and no sharp point for puncturing intestines. Breaks the rib cage, pelvis, joints with just the knife. That’s the one he built the leather sheaths for, I might have borrowed a sheath and lost it in my pack!

I have added the victorinox birds beak to my carry also, it’s great for turning ears, lips, removing skulls in the field. The last bear I took in the taxi looked the ears over and asked what I used, I got out the birds beak, said was gonna have to get one of those. I made a little sheath for it out of kydex also. The reverse curve is awesome for around horns, etc. reaching up underneath.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

MtnCam

Junior Member
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
18
Location
Too far from the mountains
Iv
Yeah I have a pretty good stock of victorinox boning, filet knives that I use for processing at the house. It sure is nice having them near a sharpener but I could not imagine using anything else. I liked using them so much that’s why I wanted to try the skinner blade. But as stated I planned on using it more in the field, figured the belly would be awesome for skinning, just not sure about breaking down an animal. I have some of those clear/white Victorinox cases for larger knives for storage in my drawers.

Mtncam have you had any experience breaking down an animal with the sheep or lamb skinner?
Thanks for input guys
I almost exclusively used the lamb skinner. Used it on several beef, 2 elk in the field and a mule deer in the field. Starting the first cut by the gambrel tendon down the back leg towards the mid-line takes a little getting used to, but is easy once you do it a couple of times.

I have not boned out a full animal using only the skinner. Always had the skinner and a boning knife together. I’m not saying it can’t be done, I’m sure there are countless people who can do it and do it better than I could imagine. I just had the ability to bring both.

Sounds like you have a lot of experience with these types of knives. You might be able to break one down just using the skinner. The few areas that may give you trouble ( in my mind) due to blade width would be the tenderloin, top loin and popping the hip joints for the back legs (if you’re quartering bone in). Otherwise you may be just fine.
 

MtnCam

Junior Member
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
18
Location
Too far from the mountains
We are a butcher family, that’s all my dad carries in the field, sheep skinner, has a narrower blade than a beef skinner, decent curve and no sharp point for puncturing intestines. Breaks the rib cage, pelvis, joints with just the knife. That’s the one he built the leather sheaths for, I might have borrowed a sheath and lost it in my pack!

I have added the victorinox birds beak to my carry also, it’s great for turning ears, lips, removing skulls in the field. The last bear I took in the taxi looked the ears over and asked what I used, I got out the birds beak, said was gonna have to get one of those. I made a little sheath for it out of kydex also. The reverse curve is awesome for around horns, etc. reaching up underneath.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I’ll check out the bird’s beak as well. Also pretty cool to know your dad can break the hips with just one knife. He inspires me to try.
 

coop22250

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
687
Location
Palmer AK
On the pelvis, skin the hair away, start lightly cutting down the seam between the legs. If you hit it perfect there is white connective tissue or facia on both sides of the knife. Once you hit the bone, put your palm on the blade and rock it back and forth, there is a cartilage joint right in the middle. If you miss by a bit, start moving one way or the other at 1/8” increments, you will find it. You can feel it with your finger, there’s a little ridge there.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Top