VPA three blade broadhead

rodney482

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
2,705
Im on year 3

Machined carbon steel

I have killed 5 deer and bear with the
same broadhead. all passthru

Head is ready for antelope
 

dcestnik

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Apr 23, 2012
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162
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Helena, MT
They're machined from a solid piece so I assume they're a harder steel than normally used. At least they feel and sharpen up like a harder steel.
 

BigWave

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Feb 26, 2012
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So Cal Desert
I'm using their vented 100's. They fly fantastic! Going on a hog hunt in 2 weeks and hoping to let the air out of a big hog with one!!
 

RockChucker30

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How quiet are the vented heads? Noise is the only advantage I can think of for going with the non vented 125 gr over the 100.
 

bohntr

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Feb 24, 2012
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471
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White Mountains of Arizona
I have heard that they are the sharpest head on the market. But unless someone gives me some free ones I won't switch from Slick Tricks. I have also heard most G5 Montec guys who try the VPA never go back.
Complete opposite in my experience. I was sent a few packs of the 100 grain vented VPA's to test. I was highly disappointed in the sharpness of the blades out of the box. I was told to "touch them up with a stone" prior to ever hunting with them. They are going to need to fix that concept if they want their business to really take off. Most bowhunters are simple minded folks......if they pay $30+ for three broadheads, they expect them to be razor sharp out of the box. Mine wouldn't even shave hair. Once I touched them up, they were fine......however I had to touch them up.

The construction of the VPA is perfect, IMO. Sets them far apart from anything G5 makes. VPA is machined metal versus G5's cast metal. Cast metal has a much lower tinsel than machined, so the VPA should be able to be used over and over, providing you know how to sharpen them correctly. Their flight was pretty good out of the hooter shooter machine. Not as consistent as ST, or Wac'em's at long range but pretty darn good. If I wanted to switch heads, VPA would be a strong candidate.
 

dcestnik

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Apr 23, 2012
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Helena, MT
Fine/fine-fine flat stone followed by a stropping block. Magnus owner has a YouTube video out showing the process
 

SDHNTR

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Aug 30, 2012
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1,577
Complete opposite in my experience. I was sent a few packs of the 100 grain vented VPA's to test. I was highly disappointed in the sharpness of the blades out of the box. I was told to "touch them up with a stone" prior to ever hunting with them. They are going to need to fix that concept if they want their business to really take off. Most bowhunters are simple minded folks......if they pay $30+ for three broadheads, they expect them to be razor sharp out of the box. Mine wouldn't even shave hair. Once I touched them up, they were fine......however I had to touch them up.

The construction of the VPA is perfect, IMO. Sets them far apart from anything G5 makes. VPA is machined metal versus G5's cast metal. Cast metal has a much lower tinsel than machined, so the VPA should be able to be used over and over, providing you know how to sharpen them correctly. Their flight was pretty good out of the hooter shooter machine. Not as consistent as ST, or Wac'em's at long range but pretty darn good. If I wanted to switch heads, VPA would be a strong candidate.
Roy, I do not disagree. I also respect your opinion and the effort you put forth testing them. That said, a little insight... In regards to sharpness, it's a cost issue.* If you want the durability of fully CNC machined and hardened carbon steel (versus welded or cast heads like a Hellrazor or Montec) you have to realize it comes at a price.* Manufacturing in this manner is expensive. Otherwise, due to the superiority of the cnc machined*construction method,*everyone else in the industry would be making heads that way too. And maybe I am wrong, but I'm of the belief that most one piece heads will likely be shot first into a target. That is the beauty of them. You can practice with the EXACT same broadhead and arrow combo and then touch up for hunting. To me, that is economical and builds confidence. Since they will be shot first anyways, IMO, final sharpening would only be a wasted expense.* It would add $8-10 more per pack to have the heads finally sharpened and the market just wont support that cost.*Besides, I like sharpening broadheads. I find it gratifying, but that is just me. I can also take one out of the package and have it shaving in less than 45 seconds. I dig em!

Bottom line, it's a trade off... Do you want lesser construction that is sharp out of the pack? Or do you want bombproof construction that you might have to sharpen a bit? That's my opinion anyway.
 
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bowuntr

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Mar 5, 2012
Messages
921
Location
Prescott, Az
I'll take razor sharp bomb proof right outta the box... Muzzy. I don't shoot broadheads through plywood and 55 gallon drums. I shoot my broadheads through animals and I want them to be razor sharp... right out of the package because I don't have the time or skill to sharpen them. I also can shoot the same broadhead I hunt with, at targets. Apples and oranges... Welcome to Rokslide (Hardcoreside) Nate. Ed F
 
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