Waders

Forelle

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2020
Messages
13
I like getting Patagonia waders at their end of year sale. Like folks said, 3 years on breathables if you use them a lot. Patagonia repairs them for you though at a reasonable cost if they’re not totaled.
 

AK_Skeeter

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
459
Location
Becker Ridge, Alaska
Definitely breathable waders.
I hunt out of a duck camp for up to 2 weeks, so I like breathable stocking foot waders I can turn inside out to dry every night.
Made in the USA Simms for $299
https://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/mens/waders/freestone-stockingfoot-s19

For colder hunts, I like LaCross Breathable boot foot for $270
I ordered a size 2 larger than normal because I wear stocking foot hippers inside so I can turn those
inside out every night to dry.
https://www.lacrossefootwear.com/men/all/all-waders/alpha-swampfox-drop-top-realtree-max-5-600g.html
 

ZC906

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2019
Messages
10
Location
Eastern Oregon
I've got a USIA dry suite for work that is excellent. So if their waders are anywhere near the quality of the suites, it'll be a winner. My waders are Simms and they did start to blow around the inside of the leg. Put 80-100 days in them which is to be expected and following routine patching. Might give the Cabelas supermag a try next as they are a bit cheaper and have good reviews.
 

ChrisAU

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
3,403
Location
SE Alabama
I'm on the market for new waders for this fall...Banded Elite's lasted about 1.8 seasons lol. Wet socks were a daily occurrence duck hunting and whitetail hunting in swamps towards the end of this past hunting season.

Looking for the thinnest (no neoprene/minimal insulation) but durable wader out there. Anything new?
 

hutty

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Messages
252
Location
maryland
Hunt quite a bit for ducks , including body booting in January. As what other have said Banded is a leaker. Out of our group (many guys 60 days a season) drake and gator waders (especially for larger guys) get the nod. I know 2 that use sitka and are happy with them (price is high). Been happy with my Drake but will be looking at Simms as well for next pair.
 

Tilley

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Messages
16
I love my USIA waders, I use them to run my trap line when it is cooler and to duck hunt in. Running a trap line I kill the knees in waders as well as they get punctured in the swamp, I do not think I will ever wear a hole in these. One word of caution is that you do need to layer in these better than most waders due to they are not breathable so you can get some condensation.

For my breathable waders that I only use in warm weather Simms all the way. They are not going to hold up to briar busting or hard use though.
 

Goolahg

Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Messages
99
Used the search function and ended here. Hopefully, I can keep this thread going in 2021 with the rest of you. First-time duck hunting (and goose hunting). A friend is taking us out several times this season on the river in upstate NY. I need some help here selecting the right sort of waders.

I have A LOT of expensive keep warm gear for regular hunting season I can layer underneath. Should I be looking for a lightweight breathable wader like 800g for all-season expecting for my layers to pickup the slack?

Is there a good one size fits all solution (doubtful) for year-round duck hunting? I'll be out on my own hunting a few backcountry spots I've spent time identifying and scouting during this summer. That will be solo, and utilizing a kayak to fetch my ducks from the middle of the lakes or ponds.

Stay away from banded is what I hear. I'd like a full boot.
 

Stefan

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
170
Used the search function and ended here. Hopefully, I can keep this thread going in 2021 with the rest of you. First-time duck hunting (and goose hunting). A friend is taking us out several times this season on the river in upstate NY. I need some help here selecting the right sort of waders.

I have A LOT of expensive keep warm gear for regular hunting season I can layer underneath. Should I be looking for a lightweight breathable wader like 800g for all-season expecting for my layers to pickup the slack?

Is there a good one size fits all solution (doubtful) for year-round duck hunting? I'll be out on my own hunting a few backcountry spots I've spent time identifying and scouting during this summer. That will be solo, and utilizing a kayak to fetch my ducks from the middle of the lakes or ponds.

Stay away from banded is what I hear. I'd like a full boot.
I am in the same boat. I am going on one duck hunting trip in January.
 

Wags

Senior Member
Joined
May 31, 2021
Messages
309
Location
California
If you aren't going to doing a lot of walking and sweating then go with a set of Neoprene's. They are warmer, tougher and usually cheaper.

If you are going to be putting out a lot of effort and walking longer distances then I'd go breathable. The insulation rating is for the boot. The 1600G will keep you warmer, but are heavier and will cause more sweating and lead to wet feet from perspiration so there's a trade off.

I've used the Rogers brand 2 in 1 Elite waders and love them. That particular wader has a new/different boot that is incredible in terms of comfort. Those also have a zip out liner for warmer hunts. I've been very pleased. I hunt mine hard and spent over 40 days in them last winter and would buy another pair.
 

andydwyer

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2019
Messages
135
Location
Michigan
Best of the best: Sitka or Simms g4

I'm running a cheap set if neoprenes for the winter marsh - TideWe. Pretty good, but the boots suck for sure.

I also have Simms G3 camo when I have to hike, spend all day in them, and early season. Super nice waders, and pretty dang tough. I spent 21 days straight in them salmon fishing on the Kenai. Probably 100 days a year in them. Great waders. E

If you have fleece and synthetic insulation to wear under your waders, you may not notice a difference. The part that will get the coldest is your toes. Good boot construction will help, but I buy my cheapies a size big and put one of those felt insoles in and a toe warmer. 🤷
 

Stefan

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
170
Best of the best: Sitka or Simms g4

I'm running a cheap set if neoprenes for the winter marsh - TideWe. Pretty good, but the boots suck for sure.

I also have Simms G3 camo when I have to hike, spend all day in them, and early season. Super nice waders, and pretty dang tough. I spent 21 days straight in them salmon fishing on the Kenai. Probably 100 days a year in them. Great waders. E

If you have fleece and synthetic insulation to wear under your waders, you may not notice a difference. The part that will get the coldest is your toes. Good boot construction will help, but I buy my cheapies a size big and put one of those felt insoles in and a toe warmer. 🤷
The Simms G3 camo is one of the ones I was looking at. With the Simms G3 do you recommend going a size big also? I'll be duck hunting in January.
 

andydwyer

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2019
Messages
135
Location
Michigan
If you can, try them on. Simms has a nice boot in there, so I'd say get your size plus room for 2 pairs of socks. My G3s are stocking foot, so I can't really help with the bootfoot ones other than trying them on.
 

Lamont22

Junior Member
Joined
May 9, 2019
Messages
25
The Simms G3 camo is one of the ones I was looking at. With the Simms G3 do you recommend going a size big also? I'll be duck hunting in January.
I found the boots to fit true to size, but the “body” of the waders is a bit snug for layering so might want to go up a size there. I bought a size large and I’m 6’ 195lbs. They fit great, but it would be nice to have a little more room for layers.
 

andydwyer

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2019
Messages
135
Location
Michigan
I'm 5'8 175, and layering up for winter is a bit tight. I think getting a "king" size would be great if you're looking to layer up.
 
Top