Want to hunt and camp in Alaska.

Bighorse

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2012
Messages
434
Location
SE Alaska
Building mutually beneficial relationships is part of being a high functioning Alaskan. I’ll move rocks if u mill my wood. I’ll split your wood if you smoke my fish. I’ll move your boat if u plow my driveway. You get the idea. Like minded individuals can and will work it out and create whatever. Be honest and have a few tangible skills she you’ll build something to be proud of. Works anywhere really but in a community where skills may not be bought necessarily, it’s good to know who knows what and how to contact them and or shake their hand a time or two.
 

String&stick

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2018
Messages
625
Ok I've tried to leave it alone, but here goes my best try at advice from a Nebraska native. . . (So take this with a huge grain of salt)

I just returned from 8 days with my wife, in Alaska and it was my best vacation of my life. In no small part because of many of the same forum members that are talking to you OP, sharing info! I loved every minute of Alaska and if I didn't have 3 kids, solid jobs, and crazy low cost of living where I'm at. . . I'd be job hunting and packing my bags. Not that I've thought about it at all, but if it was me heading to Alaska to live the "dream" these would be my year 1 steps. . .

#1 Find a job that can cover rent and food for year 1 in a place that I think I'd like to live. Doesn't need to be a dream job just something to take care of me year 1.

#2 sell all non essential items to avoid the cost of moving them and move to Alaska, plan to repurchase some items but live pretty minimalistic in year 1.

#3 make the actual move to Alaska in December or January. . . I want to know how bad the suck of winter is before knowing how sweet the honey of summer is!

#4 forget hunting year 1 as a non resident and focus on fishing and exploring what you can. Also visit lots of towns to decide for sure where I want to be located.

#5. Spend year one making friends and helping people out so they trust me and maybe one day invite me on a hunt, even if I don't have a tag

#6 spend year one also looking for a job I can enjoy and that allows me to spend time doing the things I moves to Alaska to be able to do!

#7 make sure I'm still married and she's still happy! (doesn't sound like it applies to you but if it does make sure the lady loves it as much as you)

#8 congrats you made it a year, now sign up for resident tags somewhere you can make it to, sign up for the permanent fund, and live the dream!


I wouldn't worry about what gun to take, or this and that, they have Cabela's and sportsman's warehouse, along with private gun dealers. Take half your shit to your mom's house and move up there. . . If you decide you need it you can come back for it or but something new up there!

Best of luck.

P.s. the real step one would be to get a pm or phone number from some of these AK guys and start some long convos!
 
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chapman8523

Newbie
Joined
Jan 29, 2017
Messages
7
Location
Palmer, AK
I promise you, Alaska is not what you think. TV shows about Alaska have given people a fairy tale view that just isn't reality. Start small, get a feel for the true Alaska. The size and rugged environment can overwhelm you, it's NOT Wisconsin, especially northern AK. That being said, this is the most beautiful place I've ever lived. I've hunted, camped, fished, and hiked all over this great state. I'm still amazed on every adventure. A lot of planning and preparation takes place in advance, that alone can make or break a hunt. Gear matters more here than most places. Follow your dream of AK, but be measured and calculated with your choices, you won't regret it.
 

thinhorn_AK

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
5,637
Location
Alaska
I promise you, Alaska is not what you think. TV shows about Alaska have given people a fairy tale view that just isn't reality. Start small, get a feel for the true Alaska. The size and rugged environment can overwhelm you, it's NOT Wisconsin, especially northern AK. That being said, this is the most beautiful place I've ever lived. I've hunted, camped, fished, and hiked all over this great state. I'm still amazed on every adventure. A lot of planning and preparation takes place in advance, that alone can make or break a hunt. Gear matters more here than most places. Follow your dream of AK, but be measured and calculated with your choices, you won't regret it.

This is 100% true. The overwhelmingly vast majority of people lead very normal lives.
 

Gatorgrizz27

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2016
Messages
594
Location
Tallahassee, FL
Ok I've tried to leave it alone, but here goes my best try at advice from a Nebraska native. . . (So take this with a huge grain of salt)

I just returned from 8 days with my wife, in Alaska and it was my best vacation of my life. In no small part because of many of the same forum members that are talking to you OP, sharing info! I loved every minute of Alaska and if I didn't have 3 kids, solid jobs, and crazy low cost of living where I'm at. . . I'd be job hunting and packing my bags. Not that I've thought about it at all, but if it was me heading to Alaska to live the "dream" these would be my year 1 steps. . .

#1 Find a job that can cover rent and food for year 1 in a place that I think I'd like to live. Doesn't need to be a dream job just something to take care of me year 1.

#2 sell all non essential items to avoid the cost of moving them and move to Alaska, plan to repurchase some items but live pretty minimalistic in year 1.

#3 make the actual move to Alaska in December or January. . . I want to know how bad the suck of winter is before knowing how sweet the honey of summer is!

#4 forget hunting year 1 as a non resident and focus on fishing and exploring what you can. Also visit lots of towns to decide for sure where I want to be located.

#5. Spend year one making friends and helping people out so they trust me and maybe one day invite me on a hunt, even if I don't have a tag

#6 spend year one also looking for a job I can enjoy and that allows me to spend time doing the things I moves to Alaska to be able to do!

#7 make sure I'm still married and she's still happy! (doesn't sound like it applies to you but if it does make sure the lady loves it as much as you)

#8 congrats you made it a year, now sign up for resident tags somewhere you can make it to, sign up for the permanent fund, and live the dream!


I wouldn't worry about what gun to take, or this and that, they have Cabela's and sportsman's warehouse, along with private gun dealers. Take half your shit to your mom's house and move up there. . . If you decide you need it you can come back for it or but something new up there!

Best of luck.

P.s. the real step one would be to get a pm or phone number from some of these AK guys and start some long convos!
This is pretty much what I was going to type, just was too lazy.

Get a job, build relationship, explore. Then have somebody back home ship your hunting stuff up there if it works out.

You need people to help you do something as simple as order a starter motor for a vehicle if you’re in a remote area. The place I spent a summer working involved taking a skiff across the river to get to the post office. Mail came in via a bush plane when they had enough to justify it.
 
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Goshawker1

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2021
Messages
23
Quite a bit to unpack here - not really sure where to start. But if you end up going I’d be sure to take some bug spray


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Bug spray, better take bear spray and a quality side arm.
 

MojaveJim

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2021
Messages
11
I had the Alaska life & hunting dream. Went up there for a couple weeks about 10 years ago. Took a ship to Seward then rented a 4x4 Z71 pick-up and did a loop from Anchorage - Valdez - Fairbanks - Denali & back. The thing that surprised me was the vastness & how unattainable access was, it seemed that it was either so thick you couldn't penetrate the forest or was a swamp. In the lower 48 we tend to hunt for recreation, in Alaska it's subsistence or part of the life style. I would have a pilots license and funds for a plane before I moved there for the hunting.
 

thinhorn_AK

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
5,637
Location
Alaska
I had the Alaska life & hunting dream. Went up there for a couple weeks about 10 years ago. Took a ship to Seward then rented a 4x4 Z71 pick-up and did a loop from Anchorage - Valdez - Fairbanks - Denali & back. The thing that surprised me was the vastness & how unattainable access was, it seemed that it was either so thick you couldn't penetrate the forest or was a swamp. In the lower 48 we tend to hunt for recreation, in Alaska it's subsistence or part of the life style. I would have a pilots license and funds for a plane before I moved there for the hunting.

Guys with planes have an unreal advantage here.
 

tammons

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2021
Messages
14
I plan on going next summer to camp on blm or other public lands, as well as hit every hunting season I can. Probably stay in Fairbanks when necessary.

I've never been to Alaska and it's always been a dream of mine. I'm from a northern state and am used to cold weather hunting and camping. I want as much out of the experience as possible. A moose is on the bucket list.

I'm trying to understand the laws and areas/lands open to both hunting and camping for as much of the year as possible. I think I'm looking at unit 25. Places like BLM lands that allow dispersed camping for 14+ days at a time, etc to keep a camp in a desired area.

I'm going alone as far as I know. If anybody local to there wants to meet for food and possibly hunting, shooting, or showing me around, that'd be great. Until I meet people there, I have a few questions.

1) are there public areas north of Fairbanks that allow dispersed camping and various hunting opportunities? Also open to other areas. Year round with no seasonal closure would be ideal.

2) what should I know as a nonresident hunter? If it's very restrictive I may look for a small piece of land and become a resident.

3) what kind of equipment regulations am I to know on various public hunting lands?

4) I don't want to pack too much so I want to take one gun for all game. Thinking AR-15 in 223 with 64gr speer gold dots. I can take a lot more ammo with me per lb and it's what I have stacked.. We've seen on this forum that the caliber is perfectly lethal on moose. But I could only then hunt in areas where the caliber is legal.

5) hunting advice? I've only ever hunted whitetail deer and prefer to still hunt. Never hunted moose, caribou, etc so could use some pointers.

6) Can you recommend ideal places? Any do's/don'ts? General advice about the state?

7) It's a lifelong dream. I could probably die satisfied after that. So please don't recommend another state or tell me it's a dumb idea.
You may be able to kill a moose with a 223, but you wont stop one. You need a bolt action rifle in an appropriate caliber. AFAIK, you have to live in AK for one year straight through before you can get a license to hunt solo without a guide.
 

Nick Muche

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2012
Messages
3,608
Location
Alaska
While there certainly takes some greater considerations than other places, I do think that Alaska, specifically hunting, etc. is overcomplicated more often than not. I think you'd be surprised what one can accomplish with a pickup truck and a pair of boots. Mix in a fly-out hunt here and there, you're pretty well set.
 
OP
I

iHunt20

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2021
Messages
19
Thanks for all the replies. Lots of good points made.

Friends and connections will be essential and hopefully I can meet some like-minded people who I can help as needed too.

Will definitely look into getting situated for a year or more before getting too deep into things.

For now I'm getting my rucksack sorted out and taking a small trip West next month.

Somebody made a good point about how most people live an ordinary life, and others have commented that doing what makes one happy is dreaming, fantasy, etc. I think that's a sad and unfortunate attitude toward our one chance at this life.
 
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