Water Filtration Below Freezing

treillw

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Mar 31, 2017
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MT
The water filters that I have say to make sure that they don't freeze, because it will damage the filter and cause it to not work. I have a platypus gravity works and a saywer mini.

What do you use for filtering water below freezing? I am interested in a filter/system for base camp for two people and a lightweight backcountry filter. It would be nice if one system could check both of those boxes.

Thanks!
 

mtwarden

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Oct 18, 2016
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Montana
Aquatabs or Microtabs- a fraction of an ounce for a week trip, don't have to worry about freezing (or clogging or batteries)- I typically carry a 1 liter Platy bottle in my pack and a 32 oz Nalgene on the outside- when I need to refill the the Nalgene I use the Platy bottle and then refill the Platy bottle and drop a tab in- repeat as necessary
 

jhm2023

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Jan 2, 2018
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Delta Junction, AK.
Shake most of the water out, place in a small waterproof bag or ziploc (filter only not bags) and toss in the foot of your sleeping bag at night. during the day it can be kept in a jacket pocket or if it's not far below freezing then wrapped in some sort of insulation layer and inside your pack. I don't care to use tabs or a steripen as it doesn't remove any sediment or tannins. For hunts where a lot of col weather is expected and weight is less of a concern I will take a ceramic filter as freezing doesn't damage it.
 

Mike Islander

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Aug 10, 2019
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Lowcountry, SC
The popular filters (Sawyer) can be flushed dry between uses.

How do you do this?

Thanks!
Not sure. In several "What's in my pack" videos the guys say to just blow the water out. I haven't actually had a chance to try it. Sawyer recommends you just put them in a ziplock and keep in your pocket or sleeping bag. I'll be in freezing conditions at the end of this month and will probably just keep mine in my pocket.
 
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treillw

treillw

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MT
I hate stuff in my pockets - already have enough hunting equipment in there anyway. It will probably drive me nuts in my sleeping bag. I'm just going to get some tablets I think.
 

WTFJohn

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May 1, 2018
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96
Location
CO
Steripen Ultra, a 1 L UL Nalgene, and a 2 L Hydropak soft water bladder. The screen on the Steripen Ultra will show a snowflake for the first 5-10 seconds of stirring in freezing temps as the pen warms up, then the 90 second timer will start and the UV light will come on.
 
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treillw

treillw

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Any reason the Steripen is better than tabs?
 

mtwarden

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Oct 18, 2016
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its quicker- 90 seconds vs an hour or so, but it’s heavier and takes batteries

when I use tabs I have two bottles- generally a 32 oz Nalgene readily accessible and then a Platy bottle in the pack. when the Nalgene is nearly done I refill from the Platy and then fill the Platy and tab it- it’s ready to go when I need to refill the Nalgene again- repeat as necessary
 
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treillw

treillw

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Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Messages
568
Location
MT
its quicker- 90 seconds vs an hour or so, but it’s heavier and takes batteries

when I use tabs I have two bottles- generally a 32 oz Nalgene readily accessible and then a Platy bottle in the pack. when the Nalgene is nearly done I refill from the Platy and then fill the Platy and tab it- it’s ready to go when I need to refill the Nalgene again- repeat as necessary
Ever use the aquamira drops? 5 minute mixing time and 15 minute curing time.
 

Mike7

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Feb 28, 2012
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1,058
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Northern Idaho
Some of these treatments are affected by water turbidity. The thing I like about the filters is their ability to get rid of all of the bugs and debris that you can visibly see and taste, if that is the only water source you have.

The smallest Sawyer is easily packed into your cargo pocket or your bivy sack, after putting it in a couple of ziplocs. I don't know if this is advised, but giving the thing a few shakes or swings on the end of a string removes a lot of the water in it, and doesn't seem to affect its integrity.
 

Mike Islander

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Joined
Aug 10, 2019
Messages
204
Location
Lowcountry, SC
Some of these treatments are affected by water turbidity. The thing I like about the filters is their ability to get rid of all of the bugs and debris that you can visibly see and taste, if that is the only water source you have.

The smallest Sawyer is easily packed into your cargo pocket or your bivy sack, after putting it in a couple of ziplocs. I don't know if this is advised, but giving the thing a few shakes or swings on the end of a string removes a lot of the water in it, and doesn't seem to affect its integrity.
This ^^^

The things are pretty small. And you don't have to keep them on a pocket with body contact, just close to your body or insulated in your tent. I'm thinking between your sleeping bag and pad would keep them from freezing all day long except in the harshest environments. I don't do that type of hunting, but for that environment it seems you'd have your hands full keeping your water bags from freezing, much less a filter. So melting snow might be the alternative, and generally no filter required for that unless you are paranoid or surrounded by dirty snow. If you don't have snow or ice to melt, you have a bigger problem and go back to the issue of keeping your water bags/bottles thawed.
 
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