What cartridge for first rifle build?

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JPeters218

JPeters218

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id just keep the 300wsm. does everything a .270wsm does but better. plus also outruns the 30.06 by about 200fps.
I'm with everyone here about selling both guns and just building a custom lol,
also if you get bored of that cartridge its easy enough to buy a new barrel and swap between then with a few tools at home.
Including recoil lol
 

sndmn11

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I don’t. Used to have a T3 30-06. I currently have a Savage Ultralite 30-06, and a Savage Lightweight Storm 25-06 with a Criterion barrel
Why not get the tools and gauges to swap barrels on the Savage platform? That is why I asked if you have a Tikka, it is really easy to do, I have heard Savages are similarly easy you just have to set the barrel nut/headspace.

That would save you on the cost of an action, stock, rail/rings, and keep you familiar with your rifle.

You could get your .270/.280 or whatever in between, and also stay with the same bolt face and get a .22 something cartridge, probably for far less than a new rifle.
 

recurveman

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Jun 24, 2019
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You all say the cartridge doesn’t matter at the ranges i mentioned. Is it worth selling my guns and building a $2500 custom to only shoot a max of 500 yards? (90% of my shots are under 100) Especially when I don’t reload? My local range is only 300yds as well. I can easily shoot both my current guns into 1.5” at 300 w/ factory ammo. I shoot an elk, 2 antelope, and a whitetail every year and antelope are the only ones I’ve ever had to shoot more than 100 yards for.
This rifle was going to be one that I could mix in for anything, and be the one I’d take when I cash in My mule deer points and might have to shoot to shoot a little farther.

For you application you don't need a custom gun. Yours does just fine. If you want to shoot a long ways or shoot really tight groups it helps to have a custom gun. There is nothing wrong with having a deer rifle that kills stuff.
 

Lawnboi

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You all say the cartridge doesn’t matter at the ranges i mentioned. Is it worth selling my guns and building a $2500 custom to only shoot a max of 500 yards? (90% of my shots are under 100) Especially when I don’t reload? My local range is only 300yds as well. I can easily shoot both my current guns into 1.5” at 300 w/ factory ammo. I shoot an elk, 2 antelope, and a whitetail every year and antelope are the only ones I’ve ever had to shoot more than 100 yards for.
This rifle was going to be one that I could mix in for anything, and be the one I’d take when I cash in My mule deer points and might have to shoot to shoot a little farther.
If your factory rifle shooting factory ammo is shooting no shit half minute groups every time you pull it out of the case, you are not going to gain anything.
 

762Gunner

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If I go the tikka route, which I still might, it’ll be getting a carbon six or Proof barrel. (I can’t go back to normal barrels after using the proof on my ultralite. They cool down so much quicker than normal). and an AG Privateer (I don’t like vertical grips). So it would just be in a tikka action if that changes your thoughts
Don't take this as me trying to tell you what to build but I have to correct you about CF barrels.
They do not cool faster than a steel barrel, I've spoken with barrel makers who build both steel and cf wrapped barrels and they all told me that the cf acts as an insulator and the pencil thin steel core actually gets very hot under the wrap.
The thin barrels can be overheated and burned out prematurely because the shooter thinks its cool inside based on touching the outer cf wrap.
This is one reason why Bartlein uses a heavy blank in their cf barrels.
I've owned both and there is very little if any advantage to using cf, and weight savings are very minimal.

Just something to be aware of before making your choice
 
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JPeters218

JPeters218

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Don't take this as me trying to tell you what to build but I have to correct you about CF barrels.
They do not cool faster than a steel barrel, I've spoken with barrel makers who build both steel and cf wrapped barrels and they all told me that the cf acts as an insulator and the pencil thin steel core actually gets very hot under the wrap.
The thin barrels can be overheated and burned out prematurely because the shooter thinks its cool inside based on touching the outer cf wrap.
This is one reason why Bartlein uses a heavy blank in their cf barrels.
I've owned both and there is very little if any advantage to using cf, and weight savings are very minimal.

Just something to be aware of before making your choice
I did not know that. I had never looked into it, I just went by feel. Good to know
 
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JPeters218

JPeters218

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Little update: I think I’ve decided on 7mm Rem Mag. I had always just written it off as a big magnum. Turns out it’s a lot of more tame than I thought.
As for the gun, to keep familiarity between rifles I think I’m going to build off of a savage 110 storm. (My 30-06 ultralite is just over 7 pounds scoped. I’m shooting for about 8lbs scoped on this one). I was thinking of putting a 24” Brux stainless barrel on it.
Which leads me to my next question: Fluting. My main reasons for it would be weight savings and heat dissipation. It seems as tho it will heat up a little faster than a standard barrel, but will also cool much faster.
i have about a #2 steel barrel on my 25-06 and it seems like it takes forever for it to cool.
Would a fluted #3 or 4 for one, weigh similar to a standard barrel? (Factory is 2.5lbs, brux #3 is 3lbs and #4 is 3.5lbs) and 2, cool any faster potentially?
I’m hoping to stay at around the same weight as the factory barrel because this rifle starts out a little heavy. (Although I will have an extra Ultralite stock so I could shed some weight there).
 

Spoonbill

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Jan 15, 2020
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If I go magnum it will be 300 wsm. But that won’t be this build. I think briefly about 35 whelen but it’s not easy to find a prefit barrel chambered in it
If you want a 35 whelen, have a 30-06 rebored to 35 whelen. I did that and it was 250.00 total including shipping.
 

Longleaf

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Oct 6, 2021
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+1 for 6.5 PRC, about the same energy down range as a 300wsm with half the recoil.
 

Roksliding

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Sep 24, 2018
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Don't take this as me trying to tell you what to build but I have to correct you about CF barrels.
They do not cool faster than a steel barrel, I've spoken with barrel makers who build both steel and cf wrapped barrels and they all told me that the cf acts as an insulator and the pencil thin steel core actually gets very hot under the wrap.
The thin barrels can be overheated and burned out prematurely because the shooter thinks its cool inside based on touching the outer cf wrap.
This is one reason why Bartlein uses a heavy blank in their cf barrels.
I've owned both and there is very little if any advantage to using cf, and weight savings are very minimal.

Just something to be aware of before making your choice

Hogwash!!! It’s a proven fact cf barrels are cooler (looking) and that’s what matters!

+1 for 6.5 PRC, about the same energy down range as a 300wsm with half the recoil.
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