What do you say to the new Archery Hunter?

NevadaZielmeister

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
690
Location
Reno, NV
Ladies and Gentlemen,

You all have been amazing. I have learned so much in such a short time. So much so that I took a chance and decided to put in for a few tags. Welp, I got THREE here in Nevada!! I have a party tag Buck with my friends, a cow Elk and then a Bull Elk. In Nevada, we have a 7 year waiting period regardless of whether you harvest a Bull Elk so I really have to make this season count.

I humbly ask for advise. What would you say to a brand new Archery hunter? While I have learned a lot from watching videos, hiking with my gear, and practicing in my back yard 3-4 times per week, what else can you all think of? Would a bow upgrade be worth it, as I have a Diamond bow? Does anyone have any recommendations for a good packer in the Northeastern Nevada area? Are the Tightspot quivers really worth it? Any good books to read on the subject, from tracking/spotting to butchering? Anyone know of any good classes for Elk Calling? What am I am missing?

Any help would be appreciated. As said earlier, I have learned so much from this forum, I am eternally grateful. This is a 30 year dream coming true for me.
 

Backpack Hunter

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
3,157
Location
Some wilderness area, somewhere
If your bow works for you it is great. Tightspot quivers work well for me. Elknut has some good elk calling info/books/video.
Don't forget to get out in the woods and scout the ever loving daylights out of your area.
 
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NevadaZielmeister

NevadaZielmeister

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
690
Location
Reno, NV
If your bow works for you it is great. Tightspot quivers work well for me. Elknut has some good elk calling info/books/video.
Don't forget to get out in the woods and scout the ever loving daylights out of your area.

Thank you. I will check out Elknut. I plan to spend several weekends before scouting the area.
 

archer wapiti

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2015
Messages
437
Location
New Mexico
Nothing like getting out there after a summer's worth of research to draw on everyone else's experiences, and making your own mistakes. You will make them. Don't give up. Enjoy it. It's hard, but there's nothing like it.

I paid for Chris Roe's 3 month elk subscription last year. Thought it was worth it. check out elk101 too.
 

UtahJimmy

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2016
Messages
720
Location
SLC, UT
Confidence is on you, if you don't have confidence in your bow setup, change it up.

Stephen Rinella's (meateater) guide to hunting, butchering, cooking, big game volume 1. For elk specific: Paul (ElkNut) puts out some great content, or Corey's (elk101) UEH is a can't fail option.

Good luck and enjoy the time in the field!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
 
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NevadaZielmeister

NevadaZielmeister

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
690
Location
Reno, NV
New to hunting, or just archery hunting?

New to big game hunting and Archery hunting. Did some waterfowl hunting about 8-9 years ago. That's it.

I have been practice stalking some mule deer near my home during my training hikes, got to within 60 yards on my first try. Love Sitka gear. But I can tell I need more practice.
 
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NevadaZielmeister

NevadaZielmeister

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
690
Location
Reno, NV
Nothing like getting out there after a summer's worth of research to draw on everyone else's experiences, and making your own mistakes. You will make them. Don't give up. Enjoy it. It's hard, but there's nothing like it.

I paid for Chris Roe's 3 month elk subscription last year. Thought it was worth it. check out elk101 too.

Thank you. I have been planning for this since November of last year. I plan to take about 3-4 weeks off, depending on my employer. My own personal philosophy is to just get out there for long periods and enjoy the experience. I am a huge Randy Newberg fan and agree with his thoughts and ideas.

I will check out those resources as well.
 

Felix1776

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Messages
134
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
As somebody from the midwest who successfully taught themselves how to hunt and now as somebody who's going to be teaching themselves how to hunt deer and elk in the mountains, I would say to focus more on your software and less on your hardware. Obviously, You need quality gear that's dependable but it's easy to fall into the trap (mentally and financially) of worrying way too much about gear. Read every book and article you can on the movements and habitat of your quarry. Make sure you have your navigation and basic survival skills down. It's impossible to be too good at shooting so get a ton of quality practice in. The best gear in the world is worthless if you're clueless the second you step off the trail. Good luck in your pursuits.
 

Read1t48

Senior Member
Joined
May 18, 2017
Messages
282
Location
Oregon
Congrats on your tags. I think people tend to over complicate elk hunting. As some have mentioned already, don't get too focused on gear and "stuff".

You have to be able to find elk to kill elk. Finding elk is the hard part. Once you find them, killing is easy - sounds like you have a modern bow that's shooting well for you and you're practicing diligently. That's 1/2 the battle.

Spend the rest of your preparation scouting and learning about the elk in your specific area. Watch Randy Newberg's "elk system" videos on you tube. He will help you think about how you should find elk during each season-- whether your hunting in August or November. Priorities of elk change. You must adapt.

Aside from this, I think time plays a huge component. You have to be prepared to spend 10 days+ in the field. This is the most difficult for me because if my work schedule. Try to spend as much vacation as you can for your hunting to increase your odds.
 

Beendare

Senior Member
Joined
May 6, 2014
Messages
6,254
Location
In Traffic
Don't confuse target shooting and hunting practice.

Don''t rifle hunt with a bow

When you fully understand those comments....you are on your way!
 

5MilesBack

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
11,918
Location
Colorado Springs
Finding elk is the hard part. Once you find them, killing is easy -

I don't agree with this ^^^^^ at all. Finding elk is the easy part, but once you get inside that 100 yard zone there is LOTS that can and will go wrong. #1.......the wind. ALWAYS play the wind. Do whatever you have to do to keep the wind right. Swirling winds will kill any and all opportunities.

#2........bowhunting elk is a process. You won't figure it all out in a season......or even 5. You can cut the learning curve down by reading and studying online but there is no substitute for experiencing it on your own. And remember, just when you think you've got it figured out.....the elk will throw you a curve ball. Maximize your encounters, and eventually things will fall into place. Learn from and minimize your mistakes and your opportunities will multiply.

If you want to be a successful elk hunter and can only get a tag every 7 years in NV, then I'd be hunting other states every year in between.
 

mfllood3800

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
3,178
Location
Utah
To learn as many have, we spent years accumulating experiences that revealed important information bits.
I suggest teaming up with key people in the arena of your desire.
EX:
Bow hunting- watch videos, find an archer with experience who can help you
Elk Hunting- watch videos, find a hunter who can help you
Game processing- watch videos, find a hunter who can help you

This is the theme of my post: find someone and join up and be a part of the process, then share your learned skills with the next generation.

So glad the hunting legacy continues.
Part of me used to get upset with the amount of hunter pressure in areas I used to have to myself.
But I realized I cant effectively be a part of the conservation process all by myself
So it depends how you look at the bigger picture
So many more back pack hunters willing to hike in- that's a GOOD thing

Many more archery hunters than I ever remembered and Ive been hunting archery since the early 80's.

How ever you go about it, get a good mentor, be a good mentor and hunt every chance you get so you can build your experiences in the wilderness.
There is a real confidence you get in every part of your life, when you spend weeks solo in the wilderness relying on your own set of skills.

Welcome to our adventure and sport and please become the ethical and passionate hunter we all appreciate.
 

ahlgringo

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2014
Messages
765
To learn as many have, we spent years accumulating experiences that revealed important information bits.
I suggest teaming up with key people in the arena of your desire.
EX:
Bow hunting- watch videos, find an archer with experience who can help you
Elk Hunting- watch videos, find a hunter who can help you
Game processing- watch videos, find a hunter who can help you

This is the theme of my post: find someone and join up and be a part of the process, then share your learned skills with the next generation.

So glad the hunting legacy continues.
Part of me used to get upset with the amount of hunter pressure in areas I used to have to myself.
But I realized I cant effectively be a part of the conservation process all by myself
So it depends how you look at the bigger picture
So many more back pack hunters willing to hike in- that's a GOOD thing

Many more archery hunters than I ever remembered and Ive been hunting archery since the early 80's.

How ever you go about it, get a good mentor, be a good mentor and hunt every chance you get so you can build your experiences in the wilderness.
There is a real confidence you get in every part of your life, when you spend weeks solo in the wilderness relying on your own set of skills.

Welcome to our adventure and sport and please become the ethical and passionate hunter we all appreciate.

Great post!!!! Great attitude


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

BCBowtech

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2015
Messages
163
Location
Sooke, BC
Ive been shooting a bow now for 30 years, hunting with one for 26.. Biggest piece of advise I can give you is "Patience" Learn this and everything else will fall into place.
 

garrete

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2016
Messages
47
Location
Minnesota
I wouldn't recommend buying a new bow this close to season. Buy a rangefinder(if you do t already have one)! After my bow it's the next most important part of archery gear I have.

Don't skimp on your rangefinder $ wise if you can help it


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Jeff Martin

Senior Member
Joined
May 6, 2012
Messages
988
I would tell you to evaluate your shooting. What I mean by this:are you a "drive by and punch it" kind of guy? No, I am not talking about in a horrible way, but even a slight way. I would tell you to practice on the surprise release. Nothing like doing all the hard work and shooting an animal in the hip, missing all together, etc.. Anything you are doing bad in the back yard will HORRIBLE with an animal in bow range. I think the most underestimated by far. Guys that have hunted for decades, find holding it together so much easier now than when we started - I mean related to the shot. If you shoot and can't remember what just happened - yep, I am talking to you.

Lastly, DO NOT get caught up in points, score or size. Be proud you are a hunter and kill something. HAVE FUN. Let me say it again, HAVE FUN !! Shoot something , the experience will bring larger animals. If you pass up an animal, you are a fool. HAVE FUN !!!
 

elkyinzer

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2013
Messages
1,119
Location
Pennslyvania
Mentality, don't get frustrated if it doesn't seem like a Primos video out there. 2 or 3 days without sightings can make it tough to keep your head in the game. Right when you let your guard down and get careless is usually when the big buck or bull shows up. Sometimes bowhunting is so easy. I've filled the freezer many times on sheer luck and just being out there in prime conditions. Its the ones that get it done when the going is tough, with no excuses, that we all aspire to be.
 

rodney482

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
3,127
Find your effective range through practicing like you hunt.. then dont try to exceed that range under hunting conditions.
 
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