What is "Long Range" Shooting

robby denning

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I'm pretty new to this idea. Is there a good working definition of long range shooting. Is it beyond a certain distance, is it group size? what comes to your mind when you're talking long range?

I know for me, beyond about 350, it gets tougher. So to me, that is long range.
 

swat8888

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I'd say "long range" is shooting at game beyond 400yds....probably considered longer than that if its just target shooting.
 

BuckSnort

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I agree with swat8888 on the 400 yards.. To me "long range" starts when you have to use Turrets or an accurate custom reticle to make consistant clean shots...
 

belly-deep

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I'm pretty new to this idea. Is there a good working definition of long range shooting. Is it beyond a certain distance, is it group size? what comes to your mind when you're talking long range?

I know for me, beyond about 350, it gets tougher. So to me, that is long range.

I would agree.
 

Hardstalk

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Ethical debate aside. I typically zero at 300 on all my rifles so 400 to me is a bit underrated for my definition of long range i would say past 600 is my definition.

300-600 = far
600+= long range imo
 

Ryan Avery

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I would agree with Hardstalk, 600+ is long range to me. I have been shooting out to 1200 all summer with a few out to 1500. With the right set up 600 to 1000 yards is very doable!
 

luke moffat

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I would agree with Hardstalk, 600+ is long range to me. I have been shooting out to 1200 all summer with a few out to 1500. With the right set up 600 to 1000 yards is very doable!

60+ yards is long range to me...with my bow :D

400+ I think would be long range for me, but when bullet drop is measured in a few inches every 10 yards distance and a bullet moves 1" every 10 yards of distance in 10 mph crosswind, I think thats where to true long range guys are working their magic, out past 600 really is true long range IMO. Generally not for me hunting wise as I like the stalking end of things, but it'd be fun to see what my me and rifle setups could do a longer ranges.
 
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Yellowknife

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I agree with swat8888 on the 400 yards.. To me "long range" starts when you have to use Turrets or an accurate custom reticle to make consistant clean shots...

That pretty much sums it up for me also. With a 30-06 I can deal with drop using simple holdover out to a little past 400. Beyond that, I need some help from my scope and am thinking pretty hard about wind drift. To me that's long range in a hunting scenario. At a range, 400 isn't bad at all and I'd just call it some fun target practice.

Yk
 

Segan

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Long range is as everyone knows a very debatably topic. I practice at or close to 900-1000 yards with the hope that I don't need to shoot this far. Im also a firm believer that if you need a follow up shot I will take it at any distance I feel i can. My longest kill shot is 588 yards one shot might I add. 5 total one shot kills over 400 yards. Sometimes you can't close the distance and if you are capable of getting it done why not. As far as long shots go its not the distance that is difficult it's the wind. In my opinion after 400 yards the wind is the biggest factor we run into. I shoot a 7MM RUM, 180 gn Burger Bullets at 3100 fps. The bullets have a high Ballistic Coeficient and buck the wind well. I shot a 3 shot group yesterday at 795 yards ( 1.5" high, 1.5" low, and one at 0") My left to right started at (3.5" right, 5" right and 7.75" right that was holding 2 minutes of angle left of the bullseye) Practice, Practice, Practice, especially in the wind happy shooting. I'll be in Wyoming soon hope to capitalize on a trophy.
 

RosinBag

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Long range changes with so many factors. Caliber, bullet set up, animal size and environmental factors are just a few. 400 yards on a coyote in 10 - 15 mph winds is a long range shot with a small caliber compared to a 600 yard shot on an elk in no wind. Long range is a catchy term, but it really is tough to define without knowing more about what your objective is.
 

Beastmode

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60+ yards for me. What kind of setups are you guys using that can shoot 400 yards?!?! :)

There's more to life than bow hunting??!?


I would say 400+, after that too many variables take place for ME to feel good about an ethical shot.
 

larryschwartz

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Robby,

I would suggest that long range shooting, as a general topic, is shooting at whatever distance you need to start taking into account things like drift, winds, ballsitic information, and so on when using YOUR equipment. That might be 350 yards or 750 yards or maybe just 100 yards. If it involves more than just a good sight picture and a smooth squeeze of the trigger then you are talking long range shooting skills and techniques.

Larry
 

HellsCanyon

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Totally depends on shooter and setup. Most guys hunting with a long range setup (turrets and a good rifle) I would say are capable of a 500-600 yard shot pretty easily if they are a good shooter. Other guys that are sighting in at 3" high at 100 yards with covered turrets I'd say long range is that 400-500 yards.

If conditions are right, my setup will hit a 5" plate all day long at 600 yards, and will usually group around 4" at that distance (Hardly ever shoot paper at distance so thats going off of impacts on steel). We've had guns that'll group sub 2" at 600 yards and while we don't always shoot that good, having a gun that is capable really makes those shots "chip shots".

I've never had a person I've taken shooting at 600-900 yards not be able to get rounds on target, AFTER I've got the wind dialed in. Its getting those first round hits that really take some skill and practice. Making sure you're paralax is good to go, and coaching a smooth trigger squeeze is all it takes once the gun is dialed in.

Under perfect conditions, I'd be comfortable taking a shot on deer/elk out there at 750-800 yards. If those conditions change (wind conditions), I'll drop that down to anywhere from 400-600 yards. As Rosin said, 600 yards on an elk with no wind is easy compared to a 400-500 yard shot in 15-20 mph winds.

We had a spot we used to shoot at 1220 yards down outside of lewiston up a canyon at a 12x12" plate. Usually its not an issue to get a first round hit with the big guns (300 RUM), but my .280 Ackley will almost always require a sighter shot and then its usually 3/4 hits after that if I'm having a good day.

Mike
 
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robby denning

robby denning

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Very Interesting thread. That is what I love about Rokslide: the different skill sets, the different opinions-all welcome- and what I learn from you all.

I'm thinking differently about long range now: it's not just 400, 500, 1200 but as some have indicated, long range depends on the person, the animal, the conditions, and I never thought about it like that.

With that definition, I've had some 150 yard shots that were longer range/harder than 350 yard shots because conditions were tougher.

thanks all
 
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My backcountry partner has a Rem 700 in 300 RUM, long barrel, massive brake, Nighforce scope. The thing shoots like a .22, but hits way out beyond normal are an everyday thing with this rifle.
I, on the other hand, have a Tikka T3 Lite, stainless, .308 with an old Leupold Compact 2x7 VX-1. Shooting 165 Nosler Partitions at about 2750 and sighted 4" high at 100 yards. The rifle shoots 5/8" groups with ease.

I think the long range shot is possible if, as mentioned above, you have the right information and rifle. My partner carries a Leica rangefinder and the 'Shooter' app on his smart phone. We dialed in the info I could remember off the top of my head into the app, ranged a 2' square rock across a canyon at 786 yards then let the app calculate my drops. With no turrets, no mil-dots, just an estimated 10.8 foot hold over, my first shot was less than a foot high. Second shot, middle of the rock. I guess my point is, if you have the ability to range your target accurately and can establish your drops at the intended target range, you can likely hit at about any range within a few shots.

Would I take that shot at a muley? No way. But knowing that my rifle and chosen cartridge are up to the task and that my shooting technique is solid, I would take a shot at the muley 400 yards out. The hits at longer ranges just help build your confidence in your ability to hit at what your ethical limit is.
 

rbros

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Long range to most people should be a distance that they can make a first round hit. No sighters, just a first round hit in the vitals. This takes doping wind, knowing your rifle ballistics, and an accurate rifle. The distance will vary depending on the person, and if you shoot enough, the distance will continue to stretch out. Know your limits and your equipments limits are key. Having taken big game animals out to just over 1200yds, and shoot to 2k frequently at rocks, practice and good equipment is the key. Distances are broken down. Out to 500, a guy can get away with quite a bit. You can be off on wind, elevation, ballistics, etc and still make a shot. 600-800 takes a little more experience. 900+ takes a whole new set of equipment and knowledge to make 1st round hit consistently on small targets. Baro pressure, temp, wind, all come into play hugely between a miss and a wound. Not trying to scare guys off, just see alot of guys each year taking shots they have no business doing.
 

vegas hunter

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Looking at this thread in a whole new light after this years elk season. Any shot can be a long shot if you do not know the distance for sure and you never practice at the longer distances. I shoot a 30-06 and have never shot over 325 yards, even at the range. Pushed a big bull over a ridge into a deep canyon. When I finally got there and looked in he was already at the bottom. I had a really good rest, no wind and the bull stopped broadside, so I took the shot. Missed low. Aimed just at the top of his back and shot gain. This shot hit him high in his front leg. I lost sight of him until he was way across the canyon. I shot 4 more times, whenever he would stop. Missed every shot. Luckily the leg shot opened an artery and after tracking him for a couple miles I was able to finish it. Went back in the next week with a rangefinder and ranged the shots. First shots were at 450 yards and last 4 were 650-750 yards. That first shot, if I had known the range and actually practiced shooting my rifle at that distance, was very doable and to many was not long range. I will not hunt without a rangefinder again and practice, practice, practice!!! Knowing your rifle takes on a whole new meaning past 400 yards.
 
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