What “luxury” items do you carry on your back?

mlgc20

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Oct 29, 2018
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DFW, TX
Personally, I wouldn't take anything from your list, except camp shoes. Maybe the stove if the expected temps were going to be below 0. Above zero, then my stove stays at home. I do take a chair occasionally. It's a nice luxury item in the late season and the evenings are very long. Agree with Poser on the cot. They are worthless IMO. Whatever you take, have a great hunt.
 

Jbxl20

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Dec 29, 2020
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PA
Crocs and a chair. I have the sun year brand. $25 helinox knockoff. It’s more comfortable than the helinox and I don’t feel like I’m going to break it. Plus my buddies all have burn holes in their helinox chairs. With the heavier duty fabric mine doesn’t scare me as much around the fire.
 
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Eau Claire, Wi.
Off your list i would only take the camp shoes. Those crocs are probably the lightest.

Stove is split weight. Cot worthless. Hatchet too heavy vs saw (you can just use your knife and a piece of wood for splitting if you want). Dome light silly...you shoudl have a head lamp. No tripod just use binos if its timbered area...use your pack or natural terrain to build a steady position...tripod will take longer to deploy than a tree branch. Liquor...50/50 can be fun

My luxury items are a foam pillow and flamin hot cheetos.
I agree...it’s real easy to pack too much crap!
 

bozeman

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Alabama
I pack knock-off crocs and a very nice sleeping pad....my 2 major 'luxury' items. I try not to pack:

Too much food
Too much fear
Too much feel good
 
Joined
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OR Hunter lost in Florida (WTF was I thinking?)
The only item on your list I ever take to the woods is a mini tripod. I love my mini tripod and don't leave without it. Even if I dont use it a lot, I keep it on board for photo shots because I am solo most of the time.

A chair is nice because it also serves as a drying rack at night. I have the helinox ground chair. It is nice for sitting in the short TP's. It also works well with my short 38" tripod.

I know there are creative ways to make a pillow, but its hard to beat the small inflatable pillows.

I went ultralight for a couple years and crossed the line where I was not comfortable. I now pack a few extra lbs of more comfortable gear. I figure if I am worried about 3-4 lbs, I should lose that much off my gut.

Have fun!!
 

sndmn11

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Mar 28, 2017
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Morrison, Colorado
Replace the battery powered light with a solar one, 2-7 on the list are not needed, tripod shouldn't go if not used. I do take a helinox chair for camp time and if I genuinely have a tripod need I take the Hillsound stool.
 

inyago

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Sep 1, 2019
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Goal zero crush light, lithium bat, solar charge or usb, run 6hrs at 25 lumens, read a book, play cards ect..
Other models available- 3.5ozs
 

bbassi

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Sep 3, 2019
Messages
182
you can split a lot of wood for those little stoves with a cheap Mora and a stick for a baton. It's not like you're splitting 18" oak rounds. There's also some LED light strings (like Christmas lights) that charge off a USB power bank that will save you some ounces.
 

batesdc

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Sep 13, 2021
Messages
3
This is primarily for experienced backpack / back country guys. Doing my first back pack trip this fall for a late season rifle hunt. What items do you bring from comfort that aren’t strictly necessary but you feel are worth the weight? Accustomed to horse camps so this is a change for me.

Currently planning to bring items below as they seem worth the weight on their own, but combined seems like a lot of extra stuff.

I’m estimating my pack weight with food, 1 day of water and to be 60-65 lbs including rifle with all of the below. Looks like if I went bare bones and eliminated all / most of the below I could drop 10 lbs or so.

We will hunt out of base camp and do not intend to move camp once it’s up so these will really only be carried in and out, not daily. 3-4 miles from trailhead. I’m in pretty good shape and will do some extra rucking to get ready but I’m a flat lander. Mountains are going to kick my ass.

Here is my list of luxury items in no particular order:
  1. Titanium stove - not sure this counts since there 3 of us are going and we will split the tipi / pole & stakes / stove between the 3 of us. It’s going to be cold. 4.5 lbs or so
  2. Thermarest ultra lite cot. 3 lbs. I am a terrible sleeper and think the weight is worth it
  3. Camp shoes / rubber soled slippers ~1 lb
  4. Hatchet - 2 lbs. will have a couple of saws between us so not really necessary but helpful.
  5. Battery powered led dome light for tent. 8 oz.
  6. Tripod with bino attachment and yoke. it’s a small one, 1.8 lbs. pretty tight country, not a lot of open spaces for glassing so won’t get a ton of use but it’s nice to have as a rest if opportunity for a longer shot
  7. Pint or so of liquor. 1-2 lbs. Definitely needed but fun
Sat Phone
 

Gunnersdad49

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Feb 21, 2017
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Colorado
No spring chicken here, being comfortable is important. Maybe I’ll look at swapping hatchet or tripod for a chair. Honestly I’ve been carrying the tripod in my day pack for years in same area and it rarely gets used. Just convinced someday I’ll really wish I had it.
When folks talk about "packing your fears", this is one prime example. You have the tripod for glassing with binoculars, right? Try this: Sit on your butt with your knees raised and feet flat on the ground in front of you. Rest your elbows on your knees, and glass. If you need more stability, place your rifle vertically between your knees and put the objective ends of your binoculars straddling your barrel. You can get really stable that way. Boom, saved you the tripod weight. You can also use your trekking poles if you have them.

I just hang a headlamp as mentioned above for tent light.

Your mileage may vary, but I've gone away from light cots to a better sleeping pad.

If you don't have it on your main list, a neck gaitor really helps to keep you warm in cold, windy days. Also, sunglasses in the event you are in the snow on sunny days.
 

EastHumboldt

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Joined
Nov 14, 2020
Messages
486
This is primarily for experienced backpack / back country guys. Doing my first back pack trip this fall for a late season rifle hunt. What items do you bring from comfort that aren’t strictly necessary but you feel are worth the weight? Accustomed to horse camps so this is a change for me.

Currently planning to bring items below as they seem worth the weight on their own, but combined seems like a lot of extra stuff.

I’m estimating my pack weight with food, 1 day of water and to be 60-65 lbs including rifle with all of the below. Looks like if I went bare bones and eliminated all / most of the below I could drop 10 lbs or so.

We will hunt out of base camp and do not intend to move camp once it’s up so these will really only be carried in and out, not daily. 3-4 miles from trailhead. I’m in pretty good shape and will do some extra rucking to get ready but I’m a flat lander. Mountains are going to kick my ass.

Here is my list of luxury items in no particular order:
  1. Titanium stove - not sure this counts since there 3 of us are going and we will split the tipi / pole & stakes / stove between the 3 of us. It’s going to be cold. 4.5 lbs or so
  2. Thermarest ultra lite cot. 3 lbs. I am a terrible sleeper and think the weight is worth it
  3. Camp shoes / rubber soled slippers ~1 lb
  4. Hatchet - 2 lbs. will have a couple of saws between us so not really necessary but helpful.
  5. Battery powered led dome light for tent. 8 oz.
  6. Tripod with bino attachment and yoke. it’s a small one, 1.8 lbs. pretty tight country, not a lot of open spaces for glassing so won’t get a ton of use but it’s nice to have as a rest if opportunity for a longer shot
  7. Pint or so of liquor. 1-2 lbs. Definitely needed but fun
Don’t estimate your pack wieght. Pack it up like for real and weigh it, with your rifle. The soonest chance you get, take it on a four mile hike and see how it feels. ( my guess is excruciating) If you don’t want to walk with a rifle throw an eight pound chunk of pipe on one side.
I would ditch the cot, the axe, look into one of these solar dome lights. Not enough light to do surgery but enough to see if you have your underwear on backwards. Weighs about 2 oz. I think.

 

preagandvm

Newbie
Joined
Sep 24, 2021
Messages
7
This is primarily for experienced backpack / back country guys. Doing my first back pack trip this fall for a late season rifle hunt. What items do you bring from comfort that aren’t strictly necessary but you feel are worth the weight? Accustomed to horse camps so this is a change for me.

Currently planning to bring items below as they seem worth the weight on their own, but combined seems like a lot of extra stuff.

I’m estimating my pack weight with food, 1 day of water and to be 60-65 lbs including rifle with all of the below. Looks like if I went bare bones and eliminated all / most of the below I could drop 10 lbs or so.

We will hunt out of base camp and do not intend to move camp once it’s up so these will really only be carried in and out, not daily. 3-4 miles from trailhead. I’m in pretty good shape and will do some extra rucking to get ready but I’m a flat lander. Mountains are going to kick my ass.

Here is my list of luxury items in no particular order:
  1. Titanium stove - not sure this counts since there 3 of us are going and we will split the tipi / pole & stakes / stove between the 3 of us. It’s going to be cold. 4.5 lbs or so
  2. Thermarest ultra lite cot. 3 lbs. I am a terrible sleeper and think the weight is worth it
  3. Camp shoes / rubber soled slippers ~1 lb
  4. Hatchet - 2 lbs. will have a couple of saws between us so not really necessary but helpful.
  5. Battery powered led dome light for tent. 8 oz.
  6. Tripod with bino attachment and yoke. it’s a small one, 1.8 lbs. pretty tight country, not a lot of open spaces for glassing so won’t get a ton of use but it’s nice to have as a rest if opportunity for a longer shot
  7. Pint or so of liquor. 1-2 lbs. Definitely needed but fun
I always hunt with two other guys. We always try and have our packs equal, except the guy who has the tag has the weight of his weapon system. The other two will split up a package of ribeyes and a can of beans and three beers that we will eat the first night after a brutal hike in. Nothing better to look forward to after a 5-10 mile uphill hike. After that night, it is dehydrated crap until hopefully an animal is on the ground!
 
OP
B

BlackSS

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Joined
Mar 1, 2017
Messages
42
Location
TX
Don’t estimate your pack wieght. Pack it up like for real and weigh it, with your rifle. The soonest chance you get, take it on a four mile hike and see how it feels. ( my guess is excruciating) If you don’t want to walk with a rifle throw an eight pound chunk of pipe on one side.
I would ditch the cot, the axe, look into one of these solar dome lights. Not enough light to do surgery but enough to see if you have your underwear on backwards. Weighs about 2 oz. I think.


thanks for the link to the light, light looks nice.

I have loaded the pack and weighed it, but some guess work on exact weight with food. I’ve packed meat before so I am familiar with carrying a heavy pack in the mountains and I am already putting down some good mileage with my training pack. Do not have a super difficult route planned and I’ll be pretty well conditioned so I’m not too worried.

Will leave the tripod and finding some other places to save weight as well.
 

SWOHTR

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Joined
Aug 1, 2016
Messages
887
Location
Briney foam
Good thread. The interesting thing is, it’s almost all “luxury” if you really look at it. What did the natives and mountain men take with them routinely? A knife or other sharp object? And a lot of knowledge.

Disclaimer; I’m not recommending wandering around naked with a pocket knife, hah. Just something to think about when you’re out there with nothing else to think about.
 

BLEE

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2021
Messages
18
Large knife, firestarter in a tin, stove, stainless mug for drinking and boiling.
 

Whaledriver

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Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Messages
372
Location
Colorado
The cot will actually make you colder. An inch of cold air under you is no bueno, especially in late season. I run a klymit v Luxe. Never been cold in it well below zero. I am a side sleeper and can get decent sleep with it. Down booties (I like feathered friends) work for light camp shoes and keeping feet warm glossing late season. The feathered friends have a shell, so you can keep crap out of your sleeping bag.
 

Whaledriver

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Feb 4, 2014
Messages
372
Location
Colorado
Also forgot to add. Take good notes, as soon as you get home from a trip. What worked, what didn't, what is worthless, what is invaluable. Don't wait. After a few trips you will know exactly what you need.
 
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