What should every archery hunter know?

HellsCanyon

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So I've been archery hunting for the last 5 years and have had some success. I originally got into archery to allow me to hunt better seasons, but I've never taken the time to really learn the science behind setting up+tuning your bow. The extent of my "tuning" experience has been setting up the rest for center shot then paper+bareshaft tuning adjusting either the rest or knock point. I watched the guy I bought my bow from install the cams and he was taking all sorts of measurements and I had ZERO idea what he was doing.

I'm really wanting to pick up a cheap bow press or make my own, and start learning how to properly setup and tune my bow. I'm short on terminology, equipment, and knowledge and know we got some solid people here to help me with atleast two of those issues! :)

So what resources are out there for me to start reading up on and learning? I'd like to make my own bow-press as I live on a pretty meager budget and have found some decent sources for this through google. I shoot a 2011 Strother infinity and have a set of new Bluff Country Bowstrings arriving next week so I would like to swap them out myself, be able to serve in my own peep and set everything up right. Thanks guys.

Mike
 

Moose Drool

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Mike,

I just recently went down the same path trying to learn to do everything myself. The nuts and bolts tuning guide pdf on archerytalk is awesome and pretty much covers everything you could think of. I also built a press out of a pipe clamp an have used it to successfully yoke tune my bow and replace the strings and cables. Here is the link to the press I built. Hope this helps and good luck.

http://www.skinnymoose.com/mostlyarchery/2009/12/08/diy-25-bow-press/

Ryan
 

Jared Bloomgren

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Don't overlook that there are some very good videos on the internet to help teach you as well. I have been setting up my own bows for over 20 years and it is a learning process that is for sure. Constant changes to technology and equipment that forces you to never stop learning.

The number one tool to have in your back pocket........PATIENCE!
 
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HellsCanyon

HellsCanyon

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Great stuff guys thanks for the tips... I'm a bit short on time right now but will explore that Nuts n Bolts manual further for sure!

Ryan, I'm short on wood working tools, any chance you'd like to do some horse trading for a set of those wooden blocks? :)

Mike
 

Slim Jim

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Mike,

I just recently went down the same path trying to learn to do everything myself. The nuts and bolts tuning guide pdf on archerytalk is awesome and pretty much covers everything you could think of. I also built a press out of a pipe clamp an have used it to successfully yoke tune my bow and replace the strings and cables. Here is the link to the press I built. Hope this helps and good luck.

http://www.skinnymoose.com/mostlyarchery/2009/12/08/diy-25-bow-press/

Ryan

Pretty cool bow press Ryan. I have all stuff in my garage. Looks like I'm going to have to make one
 

PhillyB

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The number one tool to have in your back pocket........PATIENCE!

This is the best advice so far.

As I was learning, I would make a minor tweak, rush out and shoot the bow to find out it didnt work. I would then go back to the garage and make another tweak, then make another adjustment in a rush, putting it farther out of tune. I would get so worked up that the bow would be a disaster after two hours of working with it.

I like to make one adjustment at a time, record what was done, then shoot it for 2 different sessions before making any other adjustments. This has resulted in the best results for me.

On a side note, there are a number of guys that sell "fingers" for homemeade presses on Archerytalk. They are typically cut out of aluminum and covered in rubber. I picked up a set for my press at $30 shipped. Something to keep in mind.
 
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HellsCanyon

HellsCanyon

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Well I just roughed out some wood blocks... will probably pick up the pipe clamp next week! Got a little creative with just a skill saw but they turned out pretty good. I might re-do them next week and pick up some oak instead as all we have on hand for scraps right now are just 2x6" Pine leftover from a deck remodel. Plenty strong but peace of mind is worth the extra $ for a designated piece of hard wood.

Only thing I might not be able to get done is the 4-6* angle cut for the limb shelf. Is that really necessary?

Been reading through the Nuts & Bolts manual. Good stuff guys thank you very much!

Mike
 

Moose Drool

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Mike,

I think the angle cut will depend on your bow. If you have a close to parallel limb bow you may not need it. I cut mine with a hand saw then sanded it smooth. Didn't turn out too bad. Two things I found out when making mine was to measure the gap between you limbs and custom cut your forks to fit your bow perfectly and I also made some small notches for the part of the axle that holds the yoke cables, if that makes sense.

Ryan
 
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HellsCanyon

HellsCanyon

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Mike,

I think the angle cut will depend on your bow. If you have a close to parallel limb bow you may not need it. I cut mine with a hand saw then sanded it smooth. Didn't turn out too bad. Two things I found out when making mine was to measure the gap between you limbs and custom cut your forks to fit your bow perfectly and I also made some small notches for the part of the axle that holds the yoke cables, if that makes sense.

Ryan

Yep I did measure the gap at 3/4" so thats what I cut it at. I think I will redo them in oak and reevaluate if I need an angle or not. Should be pretty straightforward thanks for the idea!

Mike
 

Coyote Commander

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Two things EVERY archer should be able to do at absolute minimum.

Paper tune a bow.

Broadhead tune.

Paper tune gets you close (like bore sighting), broadhead tuning gets you on!


Im always amazed at how many long time archers know nothing of either of those.
 
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HellsCanyon

HellsCanyon

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I have always paper tuned, then bare shaft paper tuned and then tuned my bareshafts to hit the same as field points out to 20 yards. Has always yielded great arrow flight but I'm open to suggestions...

Mike
 

Solitude

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I am definitely a rookie when it comes to proper tuning, but I highly advise taking a video (phone is fine, talk out loud in the video what you see) or take plenty of digital pictures to refer back too prior to starting to put on new strings or make adjustments. I have also found it handy to lay a tape measure in the pics and write down key measurements before I start.
 

jmez

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A couple of tips. When you change string and cables. Don't just pull the old ones off as you may not remember the proper routing. What ever you start with, string or cable, put the new one on as you are taking the old one off. They will come with paper clips through the loops. When you take the paper clip off keep ahold of both loops, they will untwist if you don't. If you let them untwist you will have to do a lot of adjusting after you get them on.

Before you twist, change, switch or do anything measure the Axle to axle length of the bow on both sides and the brace height, write them down. Check the exact poundage and write it down. When you change the strings/cables your draw weight is likely going to be a little low and ATA and brace a little long. You will need to twist/untwist cables to get it in spec.

When you start adjusting things write down everything that you do. Trust me you won't remember if it was 3 twists or 3.5. If you have it written down you can always put the bow back to where you started if things are not going well. Generally, adjustments are best made by twisting and untwisting cables, leave the string alone unless you are adjusting your peep sight. A full twist goes a long ways and also try to do things equal. For example, if you need to add pounds put a twist or two in top cable and the same number in the bottom cable, don't just twist one or the other. Twisting/untwisitng one is used for synchronizing the cams and timing adjustments. Everything else should be done equal.
 

Coyote Commander

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I have always paper tuned, then bare shaft paper tuned and then tuned my bareshafts to hit the same as field points out to 20 yards. Has always yielded great arrow flight but I'm open to suggestions...

Mike

Paper tune, bareshaft, and walkback tuning are just different ways to get to "point B", which is broadheads impacting with field points.

Ive never gotten into bareshaft and walkback tuning much, I just jump right ahead to broadhead tuning. I can get pretty close with paper tuning, and with most of my single cam bows ive owned over the years, paper tune had me on with broadheads as well.

Walkback and bareshaft tuning are definitely better ways to "fine tune" after your paper tuned (think of paper tune as a coarse adjustment), but I find broadhead tuning is the all end be all when it comes to tuning how the arrow leaves the bow.

I do bareshaft tune my stickbows, but thats mostly just to find the ideal dynamic spine.
 

Coyote Commander

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Thought of a third one.......in the era of the d-loop, EVERY archer should be able to tie one. Its the NUMBER 1 failure/wear part of your system.


Again, im amazed at how many have no idea how to tie one on, its easy peasy.
 

Moose Drool

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A couple of tips. When you change string and cables. Don't just pull the old ones off as you may not remember the proper routing. What ever you start with, string or cable, put the new one on as you are taking the old one off. They will come with paper clips through the loops. When you take the paper clip off keep ahold of both loops, they will untwist if you don't. If you let them untwist you will have to do a lot of adjusting after you get them on.

Before you twist, change, switch or do anything measure the Axle to axle length of the bow on both sides and the brace height, write them down. Check the exact poundage and write it down. When you change the strings/cables your draw weight is likely going to be a little low and ATA and brace a little long. You will need to twist/untwist cables to get it in spec.

When you start adjusting things write down everything that you do. Trust me you won't remember if it was 3 twists or 3.5. If you have it written down you can always put the bow back to where you started if things are not going well. Generally, adjustments are best made by twisting and untwisting cables, leave the string alone unless you are adjusting your peep sight. A full twist goes a long ways and also try to do things equal. For example, if you need to add pounds put a twist or two in top cable and the same number in the bottom cable, don't just twist one or the other. Twisting/untwisitng one is used for synchronizing the cams and timing adjustments. Everything else should be done equal.

Awesome tips man, just copied that down for later use. Thanks
 

ohhiitznik

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Feb 24, 2012
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Rochester Hills, MI
So I've been archery hunting for the last 5 years and have had some success. I originally got into archery to allow me to hunt better seasons, but I've never taken the time to really learn the science behind setting up+tuning your bow. The extent of my "tuning" experience has been setting up the rest for center shot then paper+bareshaft tuning adjusting either the rest or knock point. I watched the guy I bought my bow from install the cams and he was taking all sorts of measurements and I had ZERO idea what he was doing.

I'm really wanting to pick up a cheap bow press or make my own, and start learning how to properly setup and tune my bow. I'm short on terminology, equipment, and knowledge and know we got some solid people here to help me with atleast two of those issues! :)

So what resources are out there for me to start reading up on and learning? I'd like to make my own bow-press as I live on a pretty meager budget and have found some decent sources for this through google. I shoot a 2011 Strother infinity and have a set of new Bluff Country Bowstrings arriving next week so I would like to swap them out myself, be able to serve in my own peep and set everything up right. Thanks guys.

Mike

Hey brother, you and I shoot the EXACT same bow, with the EXACT same strings. Lol. They are a diamond in the rough. You can find them so cheap yet they will outperform most companies flagship bows and they are a 3 years old!
 

justin davis

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Feb 24, 2012
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I do all my own work. Got a bow press and draw board. Set up and tune my own bows. Build my own arrows etc. anything I don't know what to do I look up on the Internet. Archery talk etc has some very smart and skilled guys on not.
Love doing my own work. Hated having to deal with archery shops. Plus living up in the mtns with no shops near makes it nice.
 
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