Who hunts in tennis shoes??

sneaky

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
4,498
Location
ID
I still love my Altra Lone Peaks and Altra Superiors. I have a variety of gaiters that I wear with them depending on conditions and waterproof socks inside of them if needed.
I've had both and one thing I've noticed on the Altra shoes, their soles suck when its wet outside. They need to do some serious R&D on their soles. That being said, they are coming out with a Lone Peak Mid this year to compete with the Hoka Tor Ultra Mid ( I think that's the one). If it doesn't have a vibram sole on it I'm not even going to consider it, that's how much I dislike their stock soles. Otherwise I like their stuff, but durability isn't quite up to par either.
 

twall13

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
1,591
Location
Utah
I've had both and one thing I've noticed on the Altra shoes, their soles suck when its wet outside. They need to do some serious R&D on their soles. That being said, they are coming out with a Lone Peak Mid this year to compete with the Hoka Tor Ultra Mid ( I think that's the one). If it doesn't have a vibram sole on it I'm not even going to consider it, that's how much I dislike their stock soles. Otherwise I like their stuff, but durability isn't quite up to par either.
Interesting, I love the soles on my Altra Lone Peak 2.5's. They do way better for me in wet conditions than my vibram soled Merrells. I don't think the soles will hold up quite as long but the traction is superior for me at least...
 

Hudge

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2019
Messages
20
I have hunted in tennis shoes several times, just not since moving to Alaska. My son loves his Solomon’s, but since they make them small, they won’t fit me. I wear a 14D in most shoes, and a 13D in Altras. The biggest Solomon makes is a 14 wide and they do not fit, they are tight as all get out on my feet.
 

GunsAreFun

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2019
Messages
235
I’ve done it. Once. In Missouri for deer season because my boots were left in the back of the truck and it rained overnight. It wasn’t my most pleasant experience.

I’m just not a tennis shoe guy for outdoors stuff. People backpack in them all the time. I can’t do it. Weak ankles I guess lol
 

Okhotnik

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2018
Messages
435
Location
N ID
I've been using the Altra Lone Peaks for running, backpacking and hunting. Always wear merino wool Darn Tough socks and/or neoprene socks. The Altra Brand have a nice wide forefoot and are extremely comfortable. The key is too do all your training in a less supportive shoe than what you are going to hit the trail in. I wear minimalist shoes like Merrell Vapor Gloves or Vivobarefoot shoes all the time to strengthen my feet, so when I really start beating up my feet with a heavy backpack in my Altras, my feet are ready.
Another big fan of Altra lone peaks

took a few miles for my feet to get used to them but now find much more comfortable than stiff boots. Use an OR gaiter
 

Newtosavage

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2018
Messages
1,980
Location
In someone's favorite spot
I hunted in a pair of Teva Riva eVent low hikers my first elk season (early Sept) and they were fine. My buddy was wearing a heavy pair of Danners, and he sounded like a bull in a china shop behind me. He had literally no way to feel the ground. I haven't hunted in them since because it's always been too cold, but I wouldn't hesitate to hunt in them again if it's warm and dry enough.
 

Hornseeker

Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Messages
50
Brooks Cascadia is my go to shoe... seriously guys... ultra runners are putting 30-100+ miles on, on rocky, root waddy, muddy, stream crossing, talus sloped, hellish trails with NO complaints. Way back in 15 or 16 someone mentioned how "strong" their feet and ankles are now. My story exactly. I used to wear Asolos, La Sportiva and Lowa mountain boots all the time... my feet felt so protected. Amazingly, I'd roll ankles even IN those boots. Been trial running and hunting and hiking and working in trail running shoes now since 2014 and can't recall a bad ankle roll. Have packed 85# loads of elk meat off trail for 1-2 miles then several miles on trail... all with the Cascadia... there are a hundred other similar shoes.

Now... when the snow flies... my game changes. Dont mind wet feet, but wet freezing feet I cant do.

Best of Luck!!
 

Hornseeker

Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Messages
50
And here's my post hunt report. Put a lot of miles on with the Cascadias last week... then Saturday morning in SW MT the weather was cold and wet and I decided to go with my Lowas… full height, big heavy mountaineering boots. They were really comfy and warm and dry!! Killed a bull 2400 vert above the road, got him all cut up and loaded (some stashed for later) and headed down the mountain and my feet were miserable by the time I got to the bottom. NO Trekking poles!

Sunday morn, put the Cascadias on and headed up. Feet were wet within minutes. 2 hours later, at the elk meat. Load up 65# total pack weight, get the trekking poles extended... and head down the hill with absolutely comfortatble feet the whole time!

Im sure the poles would have made things better with the Lowas, but unless is prohibitively cold, I will continue to wear the Cascadias.
 

Apollo117

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2018
Messages
209
+1 for trail runners. I just helped my brother hunt in SW Colorado for 10 days in Brooks Cascadia 14's. My pack weighed between 15 and 30 pounds and we walked at least 6 miles a day.

My brother and friend both got blisters from their boots. I didn't even get a hot spot. I don't miss my boots at all.
 

darcytribe

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
776
This is my second archery season in Montana with lone peak mods. They have zero side hill support and if I’m doing much of that with them on I need to reposition the insoles after a while because they get pushed out of place from ankle roll. That said, they are so comfortable and light. My ankles are stronger now because I use them a lot. The waterproofing on them is a waste. I am surprised they are going to make it through 2 seasons as I didn’t think they would. Altra will be realeasing a genuine hiker in January called Tusher I believe. I’m praying they will keep the same wide toe box and zero drop sole. Those have been a game changer.
 

InfantryDL

Junior Member
Joined
May 4, 2018
Messages
11
Maybe already mentioned here, I've been using a pair from Altama a whole lot, light weight, drains and dries easily

Altama Maritime Assault Mid
 
Last edited:

Clovis

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2012
Messages
28
I have put thousands of miles on and off trail in multiple pairs of INOV-8 Roclite 315s (the non-GTX model). It has been a great hunting shoe for me in wet or dry conditions and with a heavy pack. INOV-8 seem to be phasing them out and I have stockpiled a couple of extra pairs I bought on sale. Until it gets really cold, wet feet just aren't that big a deal to me and they dry reasonably quickly. Better tread and a bit more stiffness than some of the Altra shoes. There are a lot of individual factors of physiology and preference in footwear but they are worth a look.
 

rm06

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Messages
240
Location
CO
Boots have been my number 1 struggle backcountry hunting, I've spent a small fortune on boots and socks. I've been tossing around this very idea for a couple of years but I think I will pull the trigger and try out a pair next season, I really don't have much to lose.

Sidehilling with a pack is my biggest concern but with most things, there is more than one way to skin a cat.

I've seen a lot of good shoe recommendations here, does anyone have any thoughts on the La Sportiva Uragano?
 

Plantedtao

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
11
Love my Asolo 520 GTX boots for the support and protection they offer... but I gotta find something better for my aging knees. Plus by the end of the day I feel like I'm banging around like an elephant.

Going to look into some of the brands mentioned. Right now trying some Salomon XA pros. I bought them for hiking, but I guess they will work for hunting. Advertisers and friends had me thinking I needed something specifically made for hunting... judging by this thread, that is just wrong.
 

Michael54

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2019
Messages
303
I'm in my merril moab 2 ventilators for almost all of archery season. Once it gets cold and wet i switch to boots though.
 

bkspyder

Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2018
Messages
71
Location
Brooklyn, NY
I have naturally very flexible ankles and have had one break. I prefer hikers like Altra over heavy boots though will admit I am not doing serious backcountry stuff.
There are plenty of easy ankle strengthening exercises out there people could be doing that would go a long way to keeping them safe while enjoying the advantages of lighter weight footwear. Just a simple band will do a lot. Eversion exercises will do a lot to prevent to common inward roll and to mitigate the injury should a roll occur.
1571925647283.png
128841
 

Formidilosus

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2014
Messages
1,101
Boots have been my number 1 struggle backcountry hunting, I've spent a small fortune on boots and socks. I've been tossing around this very idea for a couple of years but I think I will pull the trigger and try out a pair next season, I really don't have much to lose.

Start a progressive foot, ankle, lower leg workout/training program now. bkspyder’s post is a good start, but you MUST start extremely slowly and build up very gradually.


If you’ve been wearing shoes and boots your whole life, your feet are like a 400lb bedridden person. That person can not just get up and go run a marathon. Your feet are exactly the same. Going from 400 pound in invalid to a 180 pound backpack hunter is a multi years process. So is going from normal footwear to trail shoes/minimalist shoes off trail.
 
Top