Who’s running a quilt during late season?

Mudd Foot

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Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
338
Location
SW PA
I had a 0 degree quilt, it had enough loft/down to be suitable to 0; but I found that a draft at 0 degrees is not the same as a draft at 30 degrees.

I've kept the quilts that I have that are 20 degrees and plus, but went back to bags for under 20 degrees- a few extra ounces I've found are worth carrying when temps are cold, ymmv

Great info there as that’s my inclination.


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The Ri Guy

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Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
253
Location
WA

I run this 100% of the time regardless of what season it is or what the weather conditions are, I have the 20º long option. Footbox synchs closed, top can synch closed, can zip it up all the way to act like a traditional sleeping bag to negate all draft potential. With the long, I can fully enclose myself if needed.

Had it down into the teens this year and was still comfortable in just my undies, although it did get "sticky" -- note that I sleep very hot.

I have used this down to the single digits with a beanie and light merino long johns and was toasty.
 
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Ehiggins

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Joined
Dec 15, 2014
Messages
221
I have a UGQ 0 degree that is a long/wide 60”x84”. I’ve been comfy into the 20’s with just socks, boxers and a long sleeve t-shirt. It’s plenty long to wrap all the way around or pull up completely over my head it’s really cold. Weighs right at 2 lbs. I’ve been using an insulated Klymit pad but am going to upgrade this year to something with actual verified insulation values which should help too.


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Mudd Foot

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
338
Location
SW PA

I run this 100% of the time regardless of what season it is or what the weather conditions are, I have the 20º long option. Footbox synchs closed, top can synch closed, can zip it up all the way to act like a traditional sleeping bag to negate all draft potential. With the long, I can fully enclose myself if needed.

Had it down into the teens this year and was still comfortable in just my undies, although it did get "sticky" -- note that I sleep very hot.

I have used this down to the single digits with a beanie and light merino long johns and was toasty.

Just bought the Flicker20 Wide Long in YF and a GooseFeet Gear Down Balaclava for these exact reasons. Will report back.


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mtwarden

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Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
4,165
Location
Montana
I use a Flicker 20 as well (3 oz of overfill); when I expect colder temps (down to about 0) I add a MLD 50 degree Apex quilt over the top, adds warmth obviously but helps mitigate moisture getting into the down- win:win :)
 

Shraggs

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Joined
Jan 24, 2014
Messages
640
Location
Zeeland, MI
At 5’8” I use EE 20 degree revelation 950t, regular wide. No overstuffed. Mostly hammock, with matching under quilt. Covers archery easily with just base layers.

I like the zipper foot box better then sewn when it’s not in the 20’s for venting. The straps are great on a pad, still can get a draft but easily addressed.

was going to camp last November in single digits but plans changed. So, I added the apex revelation in 40 degree to layer on top. Several great threads in rokslide about the merits of mixing synthetic over down. But didn’t get to use it. In those temps in a tent so no under quilt as I’d be on a pad and in borah bivy.

I struggled with the down or puffy hoods. They compress and cold spot. I use a merino beanie. If it’s colder I’ll be in my fl kiln with hood over that. And can put a fleece hat with ear flaps and under chin string from kuhl. Those three pieces combined are very warm and weigh very little.
 

The Ri Guy

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
253
Location
WA
I use a Flicker 20 as well (3 oz of overfill); when I expect colder temps (down to about 0) I add a MLD 50 degree Apex quilt over the top, adds warmth obviously but helps mitigate moisture getting into the down- win:win :)
Such an awesome piece of gear, I love how versatile it is.

Works great for me even in the summer, works great in a hammock, just all around awesome.

I also like how the Orange color is BRIGHT, can use it as an emergency/marking flag if needed, which I have done.
 

Formidilosus

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2014
Messages
1,706
Anyone using a quilt instead of a bag during winter hunts? Is it worth saving the extra weight? How comfortable is not having a hood and sleeping with a beanie or something on?

Have several hundred nights with multiple types of quilts in 20° and colder temperatures. The coldest measured was significantly below zero. Have experience with quite a few people (more than 20) doing the same. Up until 2020 quilts have made up the vast majority of use since 2016. The other has been Kifaru Slick bags and SG bags, with a few random thrown in, and this year Zen Bivy.
I have greatly preferred quilts in all weather to any bag. It isn’t about weight to me, it’s about comfort. However, in that use and others use all the way to a measured -18°, some things have consistently shown up for winter use-

1). Everyone that has gotten anything other then the longest and widest available has regretted it. Most replaced them with extra long/extra wide immediately.

2). Everyone that plans to use it in winter, has regretted not going with the 0° quilt. Usually with overstuff.

3). Pads matter a lot. Wide pads are greatly preferred, as well as longer pads. Interestingly, enough people have commented about the feel of the different pad material and how it relates to feeling of warmth that it warrants looking into.

4). Beanies, down hats, etc. work for most. I don’t like wearing them while I sleep. A light weight merino base layer with loose hood is what I prefer if my head stays out.

5). Ground sheets- whether emergency blanket or my preference now- the Seek Matty Mcmatt Face.

Let’s say legitimate use in unheated shelters down to zero degrees. Matty Mcmatt Face ground sheet. I want the longest and widest 0° or -10° quilt I can get. I want a pad with an R value of 6 plus, long and wide. I close the foot box and put my puff jacket/pants at the bottom. Wear LW base layer with loose hood. Generally use a Nalgene of boiling water wrapped in the puff clothes. Then I wrap the quilt all the way around me so that there are no gaps. Doing this I am comfortable to well below zero.


Could those that have run quilts can you elaborate a further on the following topics:

1. Quilt dimensions and body dimensions.
2. Sewn or zipper foot box and efficacy.
3. Pad straps or zipper. Pad strap type.
4. Quilt temp rating and temp ranges experienced.

Am considering the Enlightened Equipment Conundrum versus the Convert if it helps.

Thanks in advance,


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I am 5’9”, 195lbs, wide shouldered, relatively low body fat.

1). Have used everything from a reg/reg (50’ish inch wide, 70’ish inch long) all the way to extra long/extra wide (64+ inches, 90” long). Have no interest in using anything but the longest and widest available in cold weather.

2). Both. I prefer zipped or strapped, because it makes it better to use when it isn’t cold. I put my clothes in the bottom of any bag I use regardless.

3). Have used pad strap, but do not prefer them any more. I wrap the quilt around myself.

4). Quilts that I can remember of 30°, 20°, 10°, 0°, 0° with over stuff. Used from negative 18° up. Most use is between 10° and 20°. Have been fine in any of the good ones that are 10° rated and less, but greatly prefer a 0° with overstuff.

The most used quilts have been EE Revelation long/wide, 20° and 0°

Having said all that, and while I would choose a solid quilt over any bag in western mountain conditions, I used a Zen Bivy 10° system for the last year, with 60’ish nights in it down to -18°. I will not be going back to any standard quilt in cold weather. It has every advantage of a quilt, with none of the disadvantages.
 

Jxferg7

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2019
Messages
170
1. I have a Hammock Gear long. Im 6'1. quilt measurement is 75in long 48in wide. Its plenty long for me but i really wish it was a little wider. (new HG ones are 55In in the wide)
2. mine is the older styler snap up foot box with draw string (for hammocks).I would rather have it sewn in .
3. mine does not have built in pad straps.
4. I should have mentioned this. Mine is a 10 degree bag coldest I've been in it was 18F. ( wearing my layers and puffy with beanie)
Any chance I could ask what you run for your reflective ground blanket under your pad? I just order a HammockGear Econ 10 degree....I sleep cold as shit so hoping that fits the bill down to 20-ish. I’m running a Stone Glacier SkyAir Tarp and debating between the mesh insert or running a DIY or cheaper ground clothe.
 

grahambiel

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Joined
Jun 26, 2018
Messages
274
Location
Charlotte, NC
Any chance I could ask what you run for your reflective ground blanket under your pad? I just order a HammockGear Econ 10 degree....I sleep cold as shit so hoping that fits the bill down to 20-ish. I’m running a Stone Glacier SkyAir Tarp and debating between the mesh insert or running a DIY or cheaper ground clothe.
I use a SOL emergency blanket as my ground sheet and its worked great. Weighs next to nothing, its a little crinkly but nothing that has bothered me sleeping. If you're going to use the skyair in warmer conditions, might want to spring for the mesh insert for buggy conditions but i wouldnt bring it during the winter and just run a cheap ground sheet.

I'm a quilt user as well and also sleep cold. I ran a 20 degree quilt with a hpg mountain serape used as an overbag this year in temps below zero. I slept in my puffy jacket and threw a nalgene of hot water in the bottom of the quilt at night and I was extremely comfortable....not just tolerable but toasty. The puffy and serape are part of my hunting insulation so running the 20 degree quilt helps me save on weight
 

Mudd Foot

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
338
Location
SW PA
Have several hundred nights with multiple types of quilts in 20° and colder temperatures. The coldest measured was significantly below zero. Have experience with quite a few people (more than 20) doing the same. Up until 2020 quilts have made up the vast majority of use since 2016. The other has been Kifaru Slick bags and SG bags, with a few random thrown in, and this year Zen Bivy.
I have greatly preferred quilts in all weather to any bag. It isn’t about weight to me, it’s about comfort. However, in that use and others use all the way to a measured -18°, some things have consistently shown up for winter use-

1). Everyone that has gotten anything other then the longest and widest available has regretted it. Most replaced them with extra long/extra wide immediately.

2). Everyone that plans to use it in winter, has regretted not going with the 0° quilt. Usually with overstuff.

3). Pads matter a lot. Wide pads are greatly preferred, as well as longer pads. Interestingly, enough people have commented about the feel of the different pad material and how it relates to feeling of warmth that it warrants looking into.

4). Beanies, down hats, etc. work for most. I don’t like wearing them while I sleep. A light weight merino base layer with loose hood is what I prefer if my head stays out.

5). Ground sheets- whether emergency blanket or my preference now- the Seek Matty Mcmatt Face.

Let’s say legitimate use in unheated shelters down to zero degrees. Matty Mcmatt Face ground sheet. I want the longest and widest 0° or -10° quilt I can get. I want a pad with an R value of 6 plus, long and wide. I close the foot box and put my puff jacket/pants at the bottom. Wear LW base layer with loose hood. Generally use a Nalgene of boiling water wrapped in the puff clothes. Then I wrap the quilt all the way around me so that there are no gaps. Doing this I am comfortable to well below zero.





I am 5’9”, 195lbs, wide shouldered, relatively low body fat.

1). Have used everything from a reg/reg (50’ish inch wide, 70’ish inch long) all the way to extra long/extra wide (64+ inches, 90” long). Have no interest in using anything but the longest and widest available in cold weather.

2). Both. I prefer zipped or strapped, because it makes it better to use when it isn’t cold. I put my clothes in the bottom of any bag I use regardless.

3). Have used pad strap, but do not prefer them any more. I wrap the quilt around myself.

4). Quilts that I can remember of 30°, 20°, 10°, 0°, 0° with over stuff. Used from negative 18° up. Most use is between 10° and 20°. Have been fine in any of the good ones that are 10° rated and less, but greatly prefer a 0° with overstuff.

The most used quilts have been EE Revelation long/wide, 20° and 0°

Having said all that, and while I would choose a solid quilt over any bag in western mountain conditions, I used a Zen Bivy 10° system for the last year, with 60’ish nights in it down to -18°. I will not be going back to any standard quilt in cold weather. It has every advantage of a quilt, with none of the disadvantages.

Wonderful detailed analysis and insight!


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Wapack

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2021
Messages
45
Any chance I could ask what you run for your reflective ground blanket under your pad? I just order a HammockGear Econ 10 degree....I sleep cold as shit so hoping that fits the bill down to 20-ish. I’m running a Stone Glacier SkyAir Tarp and debating between the mesh insert or running a DIY or cheaper ground clothe.
I wish I could remember the brand I’m sorry. Its just a thermal blanket, like a tarp and a space blanket had a baby.
 

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Jxferg7

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2019
Messages
170
I wish I could remember the brand I’m sorry. Its just a thermal blanket, like a tarp and a space blanket had a baby.
Could I get your opinion on a bivy? Debating on running a Borah Bivy instead of a mesh insert and ground blanket. Thoughts?
 

Wapack

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2021
Messages
45
Could I get your opinion on a bivy? Debating on running a Borah Bivy instead of a mesh insert and ground blanket. Thoughts?
For late season/winter I wouldn't worry about anything with mesh as bugs won't be a problem. A bivy in your tarp will definitely reduce drafts and bump your bag rating a bit, as the sky air pretty much pitches with an open front?? I don't have any experience with Borah. But in my experience you don't want to cheap out on your bivy if you decide to go that route. They can be a condensation nightmare. MSR, OR, and Rab all make some good ones that I have used and like. They won't compensate for a poorly insulated pad. Maybe some one else can chime in on there favorite bivy?
 

mtwarden

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
4,165
Location
Montana
Two main types of bivies

one is waterproof- this are used mostly as an emergency shelter (or for me it's what I use in snow shelters)- the eVent one from MLD is a dandy- I use sometimes if the weather looks decent as my only shelter when hunting

the other type will have a waterproof bottom and a water resistant (not waterproof) top- these tend to be more breathable than the above and more suitable for use in a tarp imo. MLD and Borah both make these types- they can get really light by using dcf bottoms, but at additional cost
 
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