WY Elk, what does the future tell us?

Overdrive

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 10, 2018
Messages
235
Location
Earth
I don’t doubt that is in the bill. However if they were really serious about public awareness you would have to opt in, not out. Will be interesting to see, but I don’t put much faith in public awareness.
Read the Bill it covers the opt in and opt out criteria, the division has always been good about putting the fees out there for the public, I have full confidence they'll do it here too.

But since this is a Wyoming hunting thread I'll say with confidence Wyoming hunting will still be going strong, available licenses might get tougher for NR but it won't keep people from applying every year.
 

5MilesBack

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
13,678
Location
Colorado Springs
I wish we could opt out of Ritter's Road & Bridge fund with every registration, that we've been paying into now for well over a decade.
 

klj100

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2022
Messages
10
As someone stated above because of forums there are more applicants each year. Wyoming also for a while non residents had priority over non residents for tags...which was great for money....but I think residents are years of complain got some more tags in certain areas sent their way.
 

tdhanses

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 26, 2018
Messages
5,085
Eventually if you want to hunt the west you’ll need to be a resident, truthfully CO could use a million new conservatives in the front range.
 

trekinit

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2022
Messages
16
I see mentions to recessions and/or high gas prices = less out of state hunters. I don't think this will have a notable impact. Non res hunters are typically not your low or even middle income folks. If you can afford to fly halfway across the country, rent a car, buy thousands of dollars of gear and hunt, you are likely in a position where you don't necessarily care about $1000-$2000 added to your overall expenses. Recessions don't impact middle-upper / upper income households NEARLY as much as lower-middle income households.

Regarding social media's impact, I see the pros and the cons.
Yes, it has definitely glamorized hunting and added a bunch of new people to the sport. The influx of folks sucks to those of us that experienced hunting before it was the "cool" thing to do.
However, in turn this is MILLIONS of dollars being added to annual budgets for habitat improvement, surveys/studies, wildlife management, and so-on. It's also a fact that hunter numbers have been declining across the country. If we don't promote hunting, we don't get hunters. If we don't get hunters, we don't get funding. Tough problem to solve and change is hard. Interested to see how this pans out over the next few years to see if the trend continues.
 
Top