Wyoming corner crossing lawsuit

camelcluch

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2014
Messages
1,265
Something to think about. I know how I feel.

 

Donny Land

Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2015
Messages
78
Location
Conroe, TX.
Rinella posted it on his IG yesterday, there's a gofundme for these guys! I think the whole deal is BS and I hope they win!
 

wind gypsy

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2014
Messages
4,983
Lots of thoughts on this thread.


A kudos is due to Rokslide on this one for reposting Rinella's 'gram post on the issue. A lot of folks haven't picked a side on this one and I appreciate whoever runs Rokslide's instagram account for having the guts to share it.
 

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
12,102
Location
SE Idaho
A kudos is due to Rokslide on this one for reposting Rinella's 'gram post on the issue. A lot of folks haven't picked a side on this one and I appreciate whoever runs Rokslide's instagram account for having the guts to share it.
that would be me. I chatted with Ryan about it, and while some hunters have completely abused landowners who've actually provided access across corners, we feel the bigger issue is access to our public lands.

And before someone starts ripping on us sharing Rinella's post (or chapter BHAs gofundme), remember that "love and war make for strange bedfellows" as it's been said.
 

Rjsand70

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2021
Messages
22
You guys have to understand how public Hunter’s treat and view private fences. I see both sides of it for sure. I sure wouldn’t want them crossing my corners and being on my fence and if they’re going to the state needs to provide a proper crossing, because if not city hunters have a tendency to break clips and pull steeples climbing on wire.
 

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
12,102
Location
SE Idaho
You guys have to understand how public Hunter’s treat and view private fences. I see both sides of it for sure. I sure wouldn’t want them crossing my corners and being on my fence and if they’re going to the state needs to provide a proper crossing, because if not city hunters have a tendency to break clips and pull steeples climbing on wire.
I totally see that angle too. That's why this needs to be hammered out for good.
 

wind gypsy

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2014
Messages
4,983
You guys have to understand how public Hunter’s treat and view private fences. I see both sides of it for sure. I sure wouldn’t want them crossing my corners and being on my fence and if they’re going to the state needs to provide a proper crossing, because if not city hunters have a tendency to break clips and pull steeples climbing on wire.

So in the case this is all about, the hunters crossed without touching anything. Is this still a problem? If there are no fences involved?
 

wind gypsy

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2014
Messages
4,983
And before someone starts ripping on us sharing Rinella's post (or chapter BHAs gofundme), remember that "love and war make for strange bedfellows" as it's been said.

The "strange bedfellows" angle is why i wanted to make sure you guys know it's appreciated. You and Ryan aren't exactly BHA poster boys and I think we'd all be in a better place if people looked at each issue on it's own merits rather than attaching it to a tribe (political party, non-profit org, etc).
 

landman650

Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
91
I recall this being discussed on one of meat eaters old podcasts about landlocked lands and adjoining corners. They basically said they’d love to see someone do this and then go fund me it to the point that it sets a precedent.
 

Rjsand70

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2021
Messages
22
So in the case this is all about, the hunters crossed without touching anything. Is this still a problem? If there are no fences involved?
You can’t cross a corner post without touching anything.
If the state put in a proper walk way it would be a little different.
 

wind gypsy

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2014
Messages
4,983
You can’t cross a corner post without touching anything.

The hunters involved in this case didn't touch anything because they used a ladder. The t posts in this case were close enough to fence corner posts.
 

realunlucky

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 20, 2013
Messages
10,768
Location
Eastern Utah
You can’t cross a corner post without touching anything.
If the state put in a proper walk way it would be a little different.
Do you feel you have more rights at the corner the other neighbors that also touch the corner or is everyone an equal share holder at that point?



Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

wapitibob

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2012
Messages
3,890
Location
Bend Oregon
The hunters involved in this case didn't touch anything because they used a ladder. The t posts in this case were close enough to fence corner posts.
They used a ladder this time because the landowner put a chain between the two posts. Prior years the hunters walked between the posts; there is no fence at this corner.
This case is nothing but a landowner wanting to keep the public off public land, evident by their harassing of the hunters on state and BLM land behind the signs.

Elk MT corner (Small).jpg

Elk MT chains.jpg
 

Zappaman

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Messages
298
I "cut" locks off gates for the BLM in the 80s as a part-time wilderness technician. There were always a few BLM ranchers who would lock public access gates every year and our district manager (big boss) decided to have me go cut them off DURING the season Vs. sending letters (that came too late AFTER hunting season was over). Most BLM ranchers were great people BTW... it was just the 80/20 rule at play.

I had two 5 ft long bolt cutters, thick gloves and face protection I used... and a map with the "usual offfenders" gates marked. I cut about 10 locks (or chains) off each year for a few years back then. The ranchers also got to see a posting I left explaining the fine they would receive if they locked it again without a reason (and with needed prior permission to do so).

Another "trick" a few ranchers would use was a chain with about 6-8 locks on it showing to the front of the gate- but that easily "unhooked" from the back side. That was cleaver and worked.

Now... although I worked for the BLM in college, I came from ranch owners who paid 10 times as much to operate as a BLM "allotee". I believed 100% in our right to private land ownership and locking our gates. Some hunters ALSO cut our locks off of to get into our ranches to hunt illegally back then too- I caught a few over the years. I made one group "rewire" my fence they just cut and drove through when I found them in the back of our 34,000 acre ranch back then. They didn't expect to see anyone back there (much less a 16 year old kid on a motorcycle drive up beside them and "pull them over"). It always ended well enough though thankfully.

The BEST story I have is when hunting Barbary sheep in 1980 on the back of this same ranch and catching my HIGH SCHOOL principle trespassing on our land-- same guy who pulled the bible out on me in his office (*a few times)-- BEFORE then. He never looked at me after that (I let him go that day because he was hunting with one of the coolest coaches we had back then too-- otherwise I would have thrown the "good" book BACK at him ;)
 

Rjsand70

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2021
Messages
22
Farm landowner here with plenty of public land love. All for it. Especially with the brilliance of the ladder.
I’m a rancher and farmer too and I’m not against public land hunters if it’s there get it, but, they need not be on a private fence crossing a private fence or any of the like. The crossing is up to the state in my mind and until then if your shoulders enter another man’s airspace I guess it’s trespassing. Gotta be some kind of walkway or something. I’ve dealt with entitled morons and private fence and I know why ranchers get mad enough to go to court.

All that being said the government shouldn’t be allowed to own land and eminent domain is tyranny while we’re on the subject.
 

Rjsand70

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2021
Messages
22
Do you feel you have more rights at the corner the other neighbors that also touch the corner or is everyone an equal share holder at that point?



Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
If youre at a corner post where 4 quarters meet in a section and you own one quarter and you’re standing on top of the corner post you’re probably trespassing. I know this is an extreme example but it’s true nobody is as narrow as a survey stake so they’re trespassing at a corner crossing. If the state or fed want to buy land for public use it’s up to them to pay for a crossing and possibly trespassing fees.

I would’ve done the same thing that the Hunter’s did but airspace is included in the bundle of ownership. The ranchers seem a little extreme in their pursuit of these dudes but we don’t know what all has happened to them or on them at this corner. In my mind ranchers and generational ownership of land comes far before public hunting ground. Crucify me.
 

Zappaman

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Messages
298
If youre at a corner post where 4 quarters meet in a section and you own one quarter and you’re standing on top of the corner post you’re probably trespassing. I know this is an extreme example but it’s true nobody is as narrow as a survey stake so they’re trespassing at a corner crossing. If the state or fed want to buy land for public use it’s up to them to pay for a crossing and possibly trespassing fees.

I would’ve done the same thing that the Hunter’s did but airspace is included in the bundle of ownership. The ranchers seem a little extreme in their pursuit of these dudes but we don’t know what all has happened to them or on them at this corner. In my mind ranchers and generational ownership of land comes far before public hunting ground. Crucify me.
It's about negotiating access... and with most BLM land allotments, there is VERY LITTLE private land typically "owned"- often less than 1% of the total allotment. But is is often at key access points (like this spot where ALL the public land is a few inches away). I agree, don't cross my fence (or damage it please!!

But... the managing agency CAN work with the rancher (and their hunting guides that buy their tags from them) to "trade" access for tags (they do this in some western states and have for at least a decade or more). I know a lot here already know this, but it's an example of how to keep landowners happy (with money from the sale of tags), while opening up access for other hunters who have the right to enjoy public lands (until some politician sells it off one day after I'm hopefully gone).

My family owned several ranches, and leased a few for over 40 years-- all PRIVATE land. I have personally built 60 miles of fence in my lifetime- good red-top wire fence too (we had goats and sheep to keep in and coyote to keep out!). But I ALSO have killed about 15 elk- ALL on public land in the western US (only one guided hunt BTW). I strongly feel young hunters without the priveledge of land ownership (like I had growing up) should have a place to go hunt. And there we no elk on our ranches.

Cities have public easements along side the streets in front of private homes where people can walk the dog or park the car and get around to the neighbor's house, etc. You cut the grass, but people are allowed on it for the "public good"-- which I believe makes the USA a cool place to live compared to other places without "access" to the world we have to share-- at least out at the edge of our property- sometimes. And I have to say, if it weren't for the $25k guided hunts out there these days- this wouldn't be an issue IF the fence wasn't touched-- because it WASN'T an issue until now. Ranchers never gave a damn--just want the fence to stay up so livestock doesn't get out... and please dont' shoot the windmill tails... or our water tanks! ;)
 
Top