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Thread: carrying arrows

  1. #1
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    carrying arrows

    How do you guys carry your arrows when doing spot stalk/ground hunting. Im going to be on a run and gun elk hunt and trying to decide between backpack quiver and bow quiver. Possibly just broadhead sheaths and strapped to pack ? What have you found works and doesn't?

  2. #2
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    I use a bow quiver. Stays on my bow all the time for practice, hunting, everything. Just never take it off. If you go that route just practice with it on there and get used to it before your hunt.


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    Senior Member ScottinPA's Avatar
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    Ditto Squirrel Master.

    Like he said, shoot with the bow quiver on all the time since it changes the weight/dynamics.

  5. #4
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    I too use a bow quiver but have wondered about another method. The thing I like about the bow quiver is the accessibility of the arrows for a second shot if you need it. I'd like to hear any suggestions for an alternative... Pros and cons?

  6. #5
    Senior Member Kevin Dill's Avatar
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    I've used a hip quiver (Thunderhorn or Selway types) and can attest to them being very nice. They take some getting used to with their position, but follow-up arrows are very available.

  7. #6
    Senior Member oldgoat's Avatar
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    I drug my feet getting a bow quiver, always used a hip quiver even when I shot a compound. Finally got one after not being able too quickly get a second arrow because I took my hip quiver off while calling elk and also while treestand hunting because the deer was on the side of the tree that the quiver was hanging on! Now I don't like to shoot without one! They also help quieten the bow if you get the right one! I'm using nothing but Selway's these days!

  8. #7
    Senior Member Kevin Dill's Avatar
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    I automatically default to a bow quiver for 95% of my hunts. The hip quiver is my go-to for certain unique situations. I've strapped a loaded hip quiver to my pack when needed, but obviously not while actively hunting. I've used a hip quiver on a horseback hunt and it worked great. I would never use one for treestand hunting, nor would I likely want it if hiking/hunting longer distances.

    Pro for the bow quiver is the obvious immediate access to your arrows. Secondary pro might be the additional mass weight which can be a bit of a stabilizer if you will.

    Con for the bow quiver (for me) is the fact that wherever the bow goes...meaning carrying through the brush, swinging into position at the moment of truth, etc....the arrows go with it. That can mean additional noise or arrow wear. My fletch take a bit of abuse on a longer backcountry hunt. Also, many times a bowhunter on the ground is shooting from behind or near some form of cover, be it a rock outcrop, tree, clump of brush or a blind of some sort. Arrows in a bow quiver can easily make unwanted contact with whatever is hiding the hunter, especially when the bow arm is extended to make the shot. In very tight settings, a bow quiver can be an outright liability.

  9. #8
    Senior Member GLB's Avatar
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    For most of my longbows I use the Raptor side quiver. I can carry six broadhead arrows and a couple of blunt type in it. It works well with a day pack and easy to weave through brush as it's tucked under my arm. I have one longbow that I use a Great Northern bow quiver and like that as well. On a extended hunt I carry extra arrows in a tube stuffed in my pack.
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  10. #9
    Senior Member TradLife406's Avatar
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    I run a Hill style bow and can't make myself put a bow quiver on it. So I run a mini cat Quiver on the side of my Kifaru. It works pretty good. Not as fast as a traditional back quiver but it let's me have my pack on. Then if I need to I can drop my pack and take the quiver off and I leave the quiver strap on so I can just put it on and go.

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  11. #10
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    Bow quiver all the way! I tried a back quiver and a side quiver, I couldnít seem to get them to stop rattling around. Broadheads sheaths are dangerous. If heard a lot of stories about folks getting impaled after falling.
    With a bow quiver there is minimal movement to get the arrow out. If you stumble or fall (who hasnít when elk hunting) you arenít going to impale yourself because the arrows arenít attached to you, they are attached to the bow. which you can keep away from you on the way down.


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  12. #11
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    I have two bow mounted selway custom quivers and love them! I can't stand a hip quiver, but I do live in Arkansas and it hangs on brush like every other step lol.

  13. #12
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    strap on bow quiver is my first choice
    hip quiver second and
    lastly is back quiver

  14. #13
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    I had a side stalker years ago, cool looking but hangs up on things or you are constantly pushing it, tucking it or pulling it around. Had a CAT quiver, that was nice but it was part of a pack system that sucked. Put a Selway on my long bow and have a Great Northern on my Titan III now, won't change again from a bow quiver. I can take a judo arrow off and slide on a broadhead arrow without too much movement, have done it several times hunting deer and not gotten busted. And if I have my bow I have my arrows can't take one without the other.
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  15. #14
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    For hunting, I use a bow quiver. Specifically a Three Rivers mini boa bow quiver. I have no complaints about it. I don't really notice the extra volume or weight on my bow, and it holds four arrows with either judo points or broadheads. I can take it on and off the bow in under a minute and it has fit every recurve I've ever tried it on.

    I'm pretty tall and lanky and pretty certain that no one has ever described me as graceful. I personally find a bow quiver to be the best solution in brush. I'm already threading my bow through obstacles when stalking through dense cover, and with a small bow quiver I can pass my arrows through at the same time, with my eyes on the fletchings to make sure they're protected..

    I used to hunt with a back quiver and found it to be a constant hassle My arrows were always getting stuck on branches above my head or spilling out when I bent over. The back quiver interfered with me carrying a pack. It is also a lot slower to draw and knock an arrow located on my back than it is to draw and knock an arrow located on my bow.

    I still like a back quiver for 3d shoots where I all I need is to carry an abundance of field points down a path.

  16. #15
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    Light weight EFA three or four arrow on the bow. For extras I carry a Palmer Bowmaster Elite mostly because I can pack arrows in it when flying. A Safari Tuff is lighter but not as protective.

  17. #16
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    A Safari Tuff quiver is great hunting quiver especially if you run into bad weather. Protects fletching and you can quickly get another arrow out of for a follow up shot.

    I primarily use a Thunderhorn Small Fry now. Ease of use, quiets bow, and lessens hand shock.



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  18. #17
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    I like bow quivers. I was installing inserts in bows I built. Or if it was a nice custom I would use Selway. I always used side or back quivers, but one time in SD I stalked a mule deer and left everything behind but my bow and 1 arrow for stealth. Of course I whiffed the shot, but the buck just stood there, and I was the dummy with a bow and no arrows. I switched to bow quivers after that haha.

  19. #18
    Senior Member CX5Ranch's Avatar
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    Check out a catquiver.

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