critique my gear

mattstanton

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
398
Location
bend, oregon
Alright guys, I am new to backpack hunting and have made some tweeks to my gear. Here is my bivy list for september elk and deer minus food and the clothes I wear in. let me know what you would change if anything.


-rei xt 85
-1 4L h2o bladder
-nalgene bottle
-katadyn hiker pro
-kelty cosmic down +30
-Big Agnes Air Core Mummy Pad
-z lite pad
-fly creek ul 2
-snow peak giga
-fuel canister
-rei titanium mug
-rei spork
-first aide and hygene bag including lighter, super glue, athletic tape, and misc other items
-2 headlamps
-matches and cotton balls w/petrol jelly
-gpsmap60csx
-maps and compass
-1 roll flagging
-extra batteries
-havalon piranta (6 blades)
-swing blade
-3 light weight game bags
-1 kifaru meat bag
-zip ties
-vortex 10x43 binos
-vortex 20-60 spotter
-slik tripod
-2 50'sections para cord
-duct tape (2' wrapped around pen)
-kuiu guide jacket
-crocs
-1 pair socks
-one pair merino boxers

-rangefinder
-extra release
-knee caps
-z poles
 

twp1224

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Feb 27, 2012
Messages
13
Just wonder why two sleeping pads and two headlamps? If your taking extra batteries, do you need two headlamps?
 

JNDEER

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May 2, 2012
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In my personal set up I only carry one section of rope, one air pad and one release. Instead of two headlamps I have one headlamp and one pen light. It runs on two AAA batteries and produces as much or more light than a 4D cell mag.

I leave a release in the car for an emergency.

If you have access to water freely I would go with a 3L or 2L bladder instead of the 4L. I also bring a colapsable 2L water jug that I fill and leave at camp if I am stationary.
 

TJ

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Feb 25, 2012
Messages
637
Location
N.E Oregon
Matt, if you are hunting in Oregon and a good distance from the trail head I would have rain gear with me.
I know two years ago during bowhunting season I was snowed on the first three weekends. I hunt the east side.
Without the rain gear I'd of had to bail out. The rain gear goes everywhere with me.

I agree with the extra release though. I know if I hadn't brought one last year I'd have been looking at a eleven mile hike back out.
Extra release weighs 2 oz
 
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sreekers

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Mar 8, 2012
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Wyoming
If I have my GPS and some spare batteries I wouldn't worry about the marking tape. Besides, marking tape makes it easy for other guys to find your honey holes......
 

dreamingbig

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Feb 29, 2012
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Location
Washington
It gets really dark in the backcountry when your headlamp stops working. Lights are one of the few things that I always take two of!
 
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mattstanton

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
398
Location
bend, oregon
I take one petzle tactikka which gets the most use but on arons recommendation i picked up a 160 lumen headlamp that I use when I am in need of some more light. I use it at camp while cooking and setting up shelters and may use it for night time tracking. I have a lightweight poncho that I use to sit out storms. The extra batteries are one set for my gps, one for my rangefinder. The extra sleeping pad is just a comfort thing. I am a big dude (280lbs) and the extra padding makes for a better night sleep. on 1 or 2 night trips I tend to leave one home but on longer trips, consecutive bad nights of sleeping add up. I may leave the ribbon at home to save some weight and one of my sections of para cord. should save some weight. I will keep the extra release. loosing a day hiking to the truck and back in just not an option.
 

Becca

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Feb 26, 2012
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Wasilla, Alaska
I would probably ditch the nalgene, as the 4L bladder should be more than enough assuming you have a source to filter from. If you want to drink out of a container around camp and such, you can use your titanium mug.
 

Rizzy

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Apr 27, 2012
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Location
Idaho
thats a pretty solid list.

I would also recommend rain gear, I used to use a walmart backpacking poncho because it was compact and light. Then I had to use it one time, now I carry rain gear and would like to get a poncho tarp.

You can't have too much fire starting gadgets, I would recomend a sparking device, trioxane, and a cigarette lighter
 

dotman

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Feb 24, 2012
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thats a pretty solid list.

I would also recommend rain gear, I used to use a walmart backpacking poncho because it was compact and light. Then I had to use it one time, now I carry rain gear and would like to get a poncho tarp.

You can't have too much fire starting gadgets, I would recomend a sparking device, trioxane, and a cigarette lighter
No need for added fire stuff the vas/cotton ballss will light in any weather, just add a bic lighter or two.
 

bowinhand

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Feb 26, 2012
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Location
Colorado
Even in September, you still want to consider taking an insulating layer like the KUIU Spindrift or something similar, also warm-warmer hat and gloves or at least both in a wind proof version. One more thing that you probably just didn't list but would be at the top of my list is Baby Wipes and T.P and maybe a trowel. Maybe also list items in your first aid/survival kit too? As for rain gear you can go two routes, light and cheap but not so durable or durable and not cheap...
 

Mike7

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Feb 28, 2012
Messages
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Location
Northern Idaho
Matt,
My 2 cents. Agree with 2 lights (with one light being a bright one for tracking, etc.). A 1/2 fist full of wadded up ribbon weighs nothing and is great for marking a blood trail or marking a kill site in thick timber on a steep north facing canyon where GPS is less than reliable (it's easy to pull off the ribbon on your way out). Having grown up in Southern Oregon I think you're probably okay on the east side of the Cascades with the guide jacket and an emergency poncho, but where I hunt I always prefer having a tougher breathable rain jacket with a puffy layer also (especially for late September). I don't think you need rain bottoms though, assuming you have gaiters and quick drying pants.

Agree with the Bic lighter with vaseline-cotton. I really like to have an extra pair of merino wool socks and gloves, especially if it rains. The BA IAC mattress is plenty warm, but a short chunk of closed cell foam pad is nice for sitting on while glassing. Also, although it is bulky, the foam pad is a great backup in the middle of the night if your inflatable mattress springs a leak (from personal experience, that really sucks when you don't have a backup foam pad for your torso while your inflatable repair dries). Consider a small light cheap gatorade type bottle as a backup to your bladder instead of the nalgalene. Also, this will allow you to keep your bladder clean if you want to mix up a drink in it like Wilderness Athlete, etc. Also, recommend a contractor/trashbag for a pack cover as needed, pack liner when carrying meat, or to put meat in to cool in the creek if need be. Consider a small spool of thread and 2 needles, benadryl in your medical kit, and it can be helpful to have chapstick in you toiletries in addition to the wet wipes (chapstick can be used as a lubricant and squeak silencer also).
 

Lawnboi

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Mar 2, 2012
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North Central Wi
Looks good. Me personally I dont take flagging tape. GPS and tp will do that. Plus with tp i dont have to worry about going back and picking up every little chunk.

Id make sure that bag is gona keep you warm

I also always leave my extra release at the truck along with my bow fixing stuff. I use a t handle so it may not get as messed up as a wrist strap(dragging through the dirt and what not), and i dont loose my stuff either. I also figure if im going to have to fix something, i need to shoot to make sure everything is still good. If i lose a half day over making sure my bow is hitting where it should, that in my opinion is a day well spent!

One way to lighten the load, which i may do this year. Is get a petzl emergency headlamp, its tiny and will get you by if your primary goes down. This year i will run the petzl myo for my primary lamp. Then keep the e-lamp as a backup. It weighs nothing and the batteries are those tiny little round ones. Good thing to look into. That extra headlamp AND extra batteries for it get pretty heavy

Id also dump one of the knives...

Carry drops or tablets for purifying water in your emergency kit. Those filters can and do fail!
 
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