Dingo

Jager

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Have a few TC pics of Australian Dingoes I thought a few might enjoy, start of with this one.
 

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Shrek

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As I understand it they are the Australian equivalent of coyotes or wolves. Are they shoot on site like coyotes are here or are they managed ?
 

belly-deep

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May 23, 2012
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They look very "domestic"

What is the story with dingos? Are they a native species or did they develop out of a population of feral dogs?
 

Becca

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They look very "domestic"

What is the story with dingos? Are they a native species or did they develop out of a population of feral dogs?

My thoughts and questions exactly! They sure look more "domestic" than I expected!


Thanks for sharing Jäger!
 
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Jager

Jager

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Yes Daveinjax, they are our equivalent, however they supposedly have only been here a few thousand years, so one side of the coin says there not native, (ones that want them shot) and the other side say they are native. (Tree huggers)

To me and most Australians they are a native predator and possibly one of the most difficult animals to hunt.

There are many areas know where they have cross bred with domestic dogs, basically giving you a pop of feral dogs, although the dogs in the pic are what you would call a genuine dingo. The tree huggers argue that there are not any left and we shouldn't be shooting any, bet you people have heard that before.

Most States of Australia they are shot on sight, where I live there is a $100 bounty paid out for each scalp presented.
 

Shrek

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I'm sure my feelings would run "if there is one left there are too many". Good luck hunting them , most canines are smart and hard to hunt once they are aware they are hunted.
 

sab

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Jun 5, 2012
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Believe it or not, but we have a similar dog in the USA. It was discovered in South Carolina and Georgia near the Savannah River in the 1970s by a biologist working at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. It is believed to be related to your dingos. They are called American Dingos or Carolina Dogs, and they are now being bred as pets.

How do I know this? Through a chance encounter, I ended up with a 6 month old female as a pet. She showed up at a remote job site about three years ago. She hung around for about four days, and seemed to be an abandoned or lost pet, so I took her home. I listed her as found on Craigslist, but no one ever claimed her.

At the time, I thought she was a cross-breed mutt, but when my wife took her to our vet for an exam, there was an Aussie fellow sitting with her in the waiting room, and he asked her where she found a dingo. When she got home, she scoured the Internet and discovered the story of the Carolina Dog.

Our dingo is actually a very nice pet. Although she is not affectionate like most dogs, she is incredibly loyal, and a great companion. She's also very tough. About 6 months after we got her, she was shot in the head with a 22LR and survived with no ill effects after surgery. Then, a few months later, she was bitten by a diamondback and survived again! We wouldn't trade her for another dog, that's for sure!

Regards,
Scott
 
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Jager

Jager

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Very interesting Sab, hadn't heard of them. The unaffectionate thing is very similar to the Dingo. Many people have them as pets, but they MUST be taken from the den at a very early age, and they never really lose their wildness.
 
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