Help! Arrow Spine/Weight

griffinit

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Feb 11, 2013
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107
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On a Windy Ridge
If you're hunting elk/Mule Deer.

I have an Elite Archery Energy 32 it's 28.5 inch draw and I'm pulling 65lbs. What arrow weight and spine would you use? Would you use a 125 grain broadhead or a 100. grain? I know theres a million different ways to do it right now I'm shooting Gold tip XT hunters 400 spine, 100gr. broadhead. But am looking for something a bit heavier? Suggestions.

Thanks
 

SquidHC

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Mar 10, 2017
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Portland, Oregon
I ended up purchasing archers advantage software (which is cheap and I recommend), and building about a dozen different arrows before I decided what I liked. Adding FOC (weight up front) is like adding fletching to the back; it helps your arrow fly true but weakens the spine. Adding weight to the back of an arrow, like lighted knocks or wraps, results in a stiffer spine rating. Everything is a compromise. Faster speed vs more momentum. It's hard to find the balance but take the time and do your homework and you should have great success.

At the end of the day, if it doesn't shoot well out of your bow, try something else.
 

InIt2Live

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Oct 18, 2015
Messages
123
Location
Michigan
First off, I think you are underspined already, and should be shooting a 340 spine with 100 or 125gr BH's. Beyond that, I prefer a higher FOC on a heavy arrow. I shoot XT's as well, and I shoot a 100gr BH with a 20gr fact weight. I get great flight, a decently heavy arrow and I get a broader range of broadhead use from what I already owned and what I can get new/used on the forums. I think the spine issue is the most important though, gold tip arrow charts put you in the 340 area for sure.
 

Beendare

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May 6, 2014
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5,323
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In Traffic
Griff,
FWIW, Everyone I know is at 450-550 total weight for an elk arrow....outside of that range works....but this seems to be a happy medium for most folks.

The only way you can screw up spine wise...is to be underspined [BAD]......overspined shoots well, tunes well and makes for a more durable arrow in a modern compound. So many guys cut spine too close by misreading charts/software and have tuning problems by being underspind....just go up a spine size and save yourself some grief.

Perfect arrow flight is key...... meticulous arrow assembly, tuning and good form trumps all other factors.
 

Muley15

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2017
Messages
192
Location
Minnesota
I would shoot for around 430 grains for your setup and that should get you around the magic 280fps. 400 spine is weak especially with the 125 heads. Depending on the arrow you want and how much weight you put up front, 300-340 spine is where you need to be.
 
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