Limb Driven Drop Aways vs. Cable Driven

Darkhorse

Junior Member
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Jan 2, 2013
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10
Hey all! Great forum!

What are the advantages of a limb driven drop away rest vs. a cable rest in dual cam bows?? Are they much more accurate or easy to tune??

Thanks for the input!
 

justin davis

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Feb 24, 2012
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Limbdriven rests in my experience fall faster so they are easier to tune. I prefer the Hamskea versa rest. Which actually can be used as Limbdriven or drops way
 

jmez

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Jun 12, 2012
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Advantages are they stay up longer and support the arrow through more of the launch giving better flight. They put no tension/pull on your cables which can affect your tune and arrow flight.

They require no setup other than bolting them on, leveling and attaching to the limb. They do not have to be timed and you dont' need to worry about vane contact. No need for serving and splitting cables, very handy if you have a failure on a hunt.
 

J-Daddy

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Feb 27, 2012
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Advantages are they stay up longer and support the arrow through more of the launch giving better flight. They put no tension/pull on your cables which can affect your tune and arrow flight.

They require no setup other than bolting them on, leveling and attaching to the limb. They do not have to be timed and you dont' need to worry about vane contact. No need for serving and splitting cables, very handy if you have a failure on a hunt.

Yep, what he said...
 

Whisky

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Dec 25, 2012
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Good topic, as I've been contemplating the same thing recently.

Tell me where I've flawed here, but one argument against a biscuit is it supports the arrow longer, therefore any torque or other flaws in form are magnified because of that. Could the same be said for a limb driven rest then?

Limb drivens definitely appear to be more simpler. And I like simple, especially if I'm giving up the biscuit.

Thanks
 

jmez

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I have not heard that about the biscuit, I don't think support of the shaft is bad. The main complaint of the biscuit, or what I would say, is that you are intentionally inducing a large amount of vane contact.

I also think, engineers correct me if I'm wrong, with a limb driven blade style rest you get consistent even support every time that basically doesn't change. With a biscuit being supported by the brushes this would be inconsistent and uneven support. Even if a blade style magnified torque, I'm not sure they do, as long as it did it the same every time that is easily correctable rather than it being different all the time.
 

jamaro

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Mar 13, 2012
Messages
92
As a general rule the more weight that you can get off the string the better....
J
 

J-Daddy

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Feb 27, 2012
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498
Location
South Dakota
Good topic, as I've been contemplating the same thing recently.

Tell me where I've flawed here, but one argument against a biscuit is it supports the arrow longer, therefore any torque or other flaws in form are magnified because of that. Could the same be said for a limb driven rest then?

Limb drivens definitely appear to be more simpler. And I like simple, especially if I'm giving up the biscuit.

Thanks

The issues with a biscuits is the extreme vane contact you get....as far as the torque part with the WB, it stays in contact with the arrow the whole time and if your jerking or torquing it really shows up when the vanes and pulling through the rest...A limb driven supports the arrow longer than a standard fall away but they are out of the way before the vanes get there.
 
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