most common mistake made by archery hunters

wapiti slayer

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With the archery season looming just a short month away I found myself thinking about the actions I've taken in the field that have led to a successful hunt. 30 seconds later, when I was finished, I decided to focus on something I have much more experience with. The things I've done wrong. Most of my biggest regrets are a result of not choosing my position well during a setup and missing out on shot opportunities. What do you think are some of the most common mistakes made by archery hunters in the field?
 

HellsCanyon

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Not anticipating the drawing position has been my biggest most common mistake while elk hunting...

Spot n stalk, trying to force the situation instead of waiting for a stalk opportunity that is possible.

Mike
 

Ryan Avery

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For me it's not watching the wind and drawing my bow at the wrong time.
 

Ross

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Not picking a specific spot on the elk to shoot at and selecting a poor location for my setup...when it goes right things can happen very fast and I have been guilty of these in the past.
 

ElkNut1

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Yes, we all have our weaknesses to work on!! But, with that said, I believe the biggest issue is not being aggressive enough with the elk!! Most hunters are too passive worrying about blowing elk out of the country so resort to no calling or cow calling! Yep, not aggressive enough!

ElkNut1
 

bowhnter7

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Yes, we all have our weaknesses to work on!! But, with that said, I believe the biggest issue is not being aggressive enough with the elk!! Most hunters are too passive worrying about blowing elk out of the country so resort to no calling or cow calling! Yep, not aggressive enough!

ElkNut1
I agree.
 

amy hanneman

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I feel one of most common mistake made by archery hunters is not taking the first good shooting opportunity you get. Most people are waiting for the perfect shot. The longer you wait the more likely something will go wrong.
I am not saying rush your shot or take a bad one. I am just saying take the first good shot you get.
 

HellsCanyon

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I feel one of most common mistake made by archery hunters is not taking the first good shooting opportunity you get. Most people are waiting for the perfect shot. The longer you wait the more likely something will go wrong.
I am not saying rush your shot or take a bad one. I am just saying take the first good shot you get.
Totally agree... I would have a very nice 5x7 on my wall if i would've taken a quartering to me shot at 27 yards that was very doable... was waiting for the perfect shot but the bull winded me 3 steps later!

Mike
 

RUTTIN

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Not playing the wind right, drawing at the wrong time, and not being aggressive enough have all ruined a hunt a time or two for me. Seems when it gets down to last few days of the hunt and I know I have to make something happen is when it pays off and I have harvested. I also agree with not putting enough boot miles on.
 

Jon Boy

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Is there any way to know when to draw back at the right time? I have the same problem. Do you guys like to draw early or draw late?
 

MT_Nate

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Yes, we all have our weaknesses to work on!! But, with that said, I believe the biggest issue is not being aggressive enough with the elk!! Most hunters are too passive worrying about blowing elk out of the country so resort to no calling or cow calling! Yep, not aggressive enough!

ElkNut1
Ditto that. And the agressiveness also applies to moving in on them, rather and sitting and waiting for them to come to you...at least in the thick stuff.

Also, in my case, drawing too early (not too late). I've had better success with late draws. Every early draw seems to make a small noise that puts 'em on alert and they never enter my shooting lane.
 

rhendrix

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When you guys say be aggressive, are you referring to finding elk then aggressively moving to a suitable shooting position (getting there fast with not as much emphasis on stealthiness) or are you simply referring to calling aggressively? I would think bugling and cow calling too much would be detrimental to being able to locate and set up on an elk that's heard many a fake bugle and cow call already.
 

Tdiesel

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I like to draw early I'm usually kneeling and will rest the bottom cam on my leg if needed just make sure to raise it up so you don't gash your leg open when you release. I'm not sure I mostly mess up not being patient( with mule deer). Elk i suppose I'm guilty of not taking the first opportunity too, probably cost me more elk than anything else.
 

HellsCanyon

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When you guys say be aggressive, are you referring to finding elk then aggressively moving to a suitable shooting position (getting there fast with not as much emphasis on stealthiness) or are you simply referring to calling aggressively? I would think bugling and cow calling too much would be detrimental to being able to locate and set up on an elk that's heard many a fake bugle and cow call already.
I think what Paul is referring to is BOTH. For example... my first ever time out calling elk AFTER watching the first version of Elknuts bugling bulls dvd, I locate-bugled a bull down on a flat about 1/2 mile away. I got the wind right, ripped out a bugle and literally started running towards that bull. Stopping ever 75 yards or so to bugle (this was early season before they got fired up too much) and letting that bull know that I was coming to him. Movement is key here and I went straight at him and slightly right keeping the wind in my favor. We were both moving towards each other until we were about 75 yards apart when I stopped and let out some chuckles. He came on a rope right to me and busted out of the trees 12 yards away. Was a decent 5x5 but I was totally blown away at how effective being aggressive and not trying to hide my presence had been. That was 3 years ago and I'm always learning more!

My aggresiveness paid off in this situation. Before I probably would have moved down the ridge and setup too far away trying to pull the bull a long ways to me. Go at 'em and recognize at what distance you need to be aggressive with your calling. Had it been later in the year and a herd bull I'd try to sneak into his comfort zone before calling...

Mike
 

MT_Nate

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When you guys say be aggressive, are you referring to finding elk then aggressively moving to a suitable shooting position (getting there fast with not as much emphasis on stealthiness) or are you simply referring to calling aggressively?
Both. I was seconding Elknut's statement about calling aggressively, primarily thinking aggressive bull sounds that raise elk interest enough that they have to come in to check it out.

But I also put in a note that being aggressive moving on elk and towards set ups has helped me greatly too. Go to the elk rather than wait for them to come to you.
 

jmez

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What elknut said, and also moving in on them as well as the calling.

I grew up hunting whitetails and have to constantly remind myself that elk aren't like a deer when hunting them. You need to move and move fast, you don't have to be quiet, and most times it is better if you make some noise.

My being careful and quiet last year cost me a mature bull. Instead of moving down the edge of the trees 50 yards and shooting him like I should have I got up in the timber and tried to very quietly and slowly sneak up on him. He was gone by the time I got there.
 

MT_Nate

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My being careful and quiet last year cost me a mature bull. Instead of moving down the edge of the trees 50 yards and shooting him like I should have I got up in the timber and tried to very quietly and slowly sneak up on him. He was gone by the time I got there.
Well said. I feel I'm a much happier hunter, successful or not, if I've made a strong efforts to get close encounters with bulls rather than sit and wait for the elk to make things happen for me. In the thick jungles we hunt in NW Montana, you may never even see an elk all season unless you use these tactics.
 

KMT

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Leaving my spot too soon after I call. I seem to get bored and leave 20-30 minutes after I call if I don't hear anything. I get up to move to my next spot and then get busted by a silent bull.
 
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