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MK280AI

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2018
Messages
147
Location
AZ
I would keep hunting it, and dont tell ANYONE. In time you will know every inch of it. I used to hunt an area like that where I grew up and killed several nice bucks there. The older bucks are there just for the reasons you stated.
 

Rich M

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2017
Messages
1,823
Location
Orlando
Sounds like you found a honey hole. Shouldn't be too much competition and you know several big bucks are in there.

Figure out their patterns, feed areas, bedding areas, etc. You can probably bust em out of the beds 2x during the summer - GPS the bed locations.

This is typical eastern hunting - we hunt what we can't see most of the time.
 

elkguide

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2016
Messages
3,726
Location
Vermont
A couple 170" class 4 points and you want to move?????????????

Well if it's to hard of an area to hunt, please share. I like a good hunt/challenge!




I would return again this year and take what you learned last year and add on to that knowledge and kill one of those 170", I mean 180" with an extra years growth!
 

elkguide

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2016
Messages
3,726
Location
Vermont
Haha I know it sounds crazy! I have never hunted an area where it’s basically hunting thick timber and very little ability to glass. I guess it was just shell shock since I’m used to hunting high open country with broken timber. I appreciate the reply’s though!

Sort of like visiting a new theme park or national park...… you get to see new things and learn something new a long the way. Yes hunting in dark timber and blow downs does put you in a different hunting mode and you have to learn new skills to succeed but oh when you do...…. what a sense of accomplishment. No different than hunting elk with a bow vs: a rifle.

I joked about leaving an area that you found a couple of 170" class deer last fall but man if you saw them, caught a glimpse of them...… think about how big they will be this fall and think about just how better prepared you are going to be this fall!
 

Stick'nString

Newbie
Joined
May 20, 2019
Messages
6
Personally, I think part of the hunting experience is challenging yourself and stepping out of your comfort zone. Makes the success that much sweeter. I get where you're coming from though. I moved out west from Michigan in 2014. The hunting is entirely different, but the challenge is exhilarating.
 

Muley Buck

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2016
Messages
1,375
Location
California
I've got a place similar to what you describe. I've been on it for 5 years, 3 of which I hunted it very hard and 2 not so much due to other hunts getting in the way. This year I am dedicating a decent amount of time there and hopefully going to drop the hammer on a nice one. I thought they were unkillable by year 2 and part of 3. It wasn't until I spent enough time there, s-l-o-w-l-y putting the pieces together. I "think" I can get it done this year, at least I've got to believe that I can. I will never give up on that spot, it WILL come together and happen.
 
Joined
May 20, 2019
Messages
51
Location
Ellensburg, Washington
Sounds like a good problem to have. An area like this is I bet what most adventure based hunters (myself included) want to find. The suffering is part of the process.
But, speaking to your original question, what discourages me the most in an area is human presence. Hikers, hunters, bikers, whatever..
 

Muley Buck

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2016
Messages
1,375
Location
California
Sounds like a good problem to have. An area like this is I bet what most adventure based hunters (myself included) want to find. The suffering is part of the process.
But, speaking to your original question, what discourages me the most in an area is human presence. Hikers, hunters, bikers, whatever..
Yes. It is a good problem to have. Although that doesn't make it any less frustrating.
 

a_noob_hunter

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
181
I would encourage you to stay and hunt and adapt to it. If you can figure out how to hunt it this year or even in the next two years you could have some huge deer back there. I would feel comfortable leaving it for another area if you are out-of-state and dont/can't scout it or take time to learn how to hunt it. Sounds like you have a honey-hole with alot of potential

Sent from my PH-1 using Tapatalk
 

ntrlbrnhunter

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2019
Messages
393
That’s how I found it Was glassing from 3 miles away. It’s a long haul to try and drop down and climb back up to where the deer were though. It would take 6-7 hours of hiking

I know exactly what your talking about and I hunt a few places like this, it’s tough and a great question.... the best thing I have found is sit back and glass (from bottom where you can see most of the hill) and use trail cams to learn travel routes/feeding/bedding areas the best you can, then attempt to still hunt it (rain/snow might help if it’s like my spot) or try to ambush them bucks. I have a spot exactly like you have described that I have taken 5 mature bucks off of, all close range in thick nasty stuff.

There is a reason them bucks are there, don’t go chasing hopes of finding others when you’ve done the hardest part IMO.
 

street

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2018
Messages
413
Location
CO
Sounds like you found a honey hole. Shouldn't be too much competition and you know several big bucks are in there.

Figure out their patterns, feed areas, bedding areas, etc. You can probably bust em out of the beds 2x during the summer - GPS the bed locations.

This is typical eastern hunting - we hunt what we can't see most of the time.

This would be my advice as well. I've had good success (not always killing) with scouting these kinds of areas, finding the bedding areas, trails, etc. and letting it settle and then going back and hunting it. If you aren't experienced "tree stand" type hunting, or similar, it can be difficult mentally. But you have a huge advantage KNOWING they live there. I'm not sure if this is the case in the west, but whitetails tend to be in the same areas around the same time each year. This is an advantage midwest hunters take advantage of all the time.
 

idelkslayer

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2013
Messages
272
Location
Idaho
The answer is it depends...PM the location to me and I'll let you know what I think. [Insert sarcasm here]
 

Nickofthewoods

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2018
Messages
631
Location
Colorado
I have a few spots like this. I can glass it from the opposite ridge and spotting them isn't the problem. The scrub brush is so thick that there really isn't a feasible way to get in close so I just watch them and see where they are coming in from and try to intercept early or late in the day.
 
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