Teach me to be a more patient Glasser...

2rocky

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
1,050
Location
Nor Cal
If I draw my High country Wyoming Deer tag this Fall, I am going to really have my work cut out for me in 10,000-12000 ft ridges Where the general advice has been "sit down and glass". I tend to be a lil on the impatient side and want to se what is on the other side of the hill.

How do I cultivate the ability to glass effectively with my good optics? Do I practice glassing for X number of minutes in the off season?

How do I know when that buck is in a stalkable position 3/4 of a mile away? When do I give up on a buck in an unapproachable position?

How long do I give a mountainside before I look for new country to glass?

I did invest in a Thermarest "chair" in the hopes it will keep me comfortable.
 

Travis Bertrand

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 9, 2012
Messages
3,471
Location
Reno,NV
Self-discipline is up to you. It's up to you to see that through. The longer you stay in your gassing spot( choose a good one whee you can see a lot) the better chances of finding him.

Being comfortable helps a lot.
 

HellsCanyon

Senior Member
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
May 29, 2012
Messages
3,474
Location
Lewiston ID
All mental man... The thing that would keep me sitting there, is if I KNOW there is a big buck around. Scouting and recognizing that country is key. That's why it is tough to hunt areas for the first time without scouting. While scouting you can afford to head over the ridge and keep moving fast. The more I've hunted the better my patience has gotten. Also make yourself as comfortable as possible. Best of luck...

Mike
 

Becca

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
2,043
Location
Wasilla, Alaska
I did invest in a Thermarest "chair" in the hopes it will keep me comfortable.

If its like the ones we picked up last season, I don't think you will be disappointed. Having a comfortable seat with back support has made a huge difference for me in being able to glass longer. Have never used a tripod when glassing with binos, but sittiing in a way that I can steady my glassing arm against my knee keeps the shaking down.

I guess it goes without saying, but the best binos you can afford will help too...I used to feel like I "timed out" due to eye fatigue before we upgraded my glass. You don't need to break the bank, but finding something that works (for your eyes) will make it easier to want to glass longer, at least IMO.

I still can't glass as long as Luke can, especially if things aren't moving. I do find sometimes I stop looking through my binos and just take in the whole scene before me with my eyes. I often find something that makes me curious for a better look, and before I know it I am motivated to pull out the binos again.
 

frans

Senior Member
Joined
May 4, 2012
Messages
108
I'm not good at it, but getting better. I tend to take something to read, so I can take small breaks and give my eyes something different to do. But generally someone should chain me to some rocks to prevent me from wandering all over the place.

I made a rule for myself that I will match glassing time with hiking time. So if the hike up is two hours, and back is an hour and a half, I must glass at least 3.5 h.
Hike another two hours to another basin, stay there at least 2-4h. And so on.

I'm still more of a mountaineer than a hunter but I'm learning. Good luck!

Frans
 
Last edited:

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
11,729
Location
SE Idaho
How do I know when that buck is in a stalkable position 3/4 of a mile away? When do I give up on a buck in an unapproachable position?

Let the wind direction, the time of day (as in light remaining) and the deer behavior (are they jittery and moving a lot or calmy bedding) determine your answer. If you're on the opener, you'll likely have company, so must consider that, too.

Best of luck!
 

Califhuntn

Senior Member
Joined
May 22, 2012
Messages
190
Location
Lathrop, Ca
Get as comfortable as you can. I have been packing an REI trail chair. I am working on a lighter weight design to cut the weight in half (another thread). I have used a tripod in the past but a have found that I like using a trekking pole. I can can get very stable and remain hands free. The more stable the less tired I get.
 

bern0134

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2012
Messages
16
Location
Northern New Mexico
Just going to reiterate what everyone else has said. The best glass you can afford will help with eye relief and allow you to glass longer. Patience and persistence. Don't be afraid to double check areas that look like they hold deer. Last year a glasses an area didn't see anything, put my head down to rest my eyes for a few seconds and the 2nd time there was a Buck standing there looking in my direction in the same area I just glassed. As for comfort, I never thought about those chairs you mentioned. I usually just find a large rock or edge I can lay over and glass a canyon or lean against the slope of the ridge and place my arms on my chest. If you see something and you can't hold steady after seeing it, then you'll know it's worth going after even if its over a mile away. The. Let your hunting senses take over. Check wind, look at the surrounding terrain that you can use to your advantage and the animal's behavior. Best of luck to you
 

mtnkid85

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2012
Messages
798
Location
Beartooth Mtns, MT
Ive realized using a tripod/pole/stick what ever to glass off of with binos helps immensely! Ill sit down in my crazy creek chair, setup my tripod/spotting scope infront of me then pop off the spotter with the quick disco plate and just set my bins on the tripod. The steadier image really makes glassing more enjoyable and Im more likely to set the spotter back on the tripod for a quick closer look because its all setup already.

The biggest thing that stops me from glassing is getting cold. So I really try to bundle up with everything I can as soon as I sit down, trying not to wait tell Im already cold. Ill even pull out my empty bivy sack and slide my legs down into it on occasion.
 

Shane

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2012
Messages
172
Location
Abilene, Texas
Fight the urge to scan randomly. You'll fool yourself into believing that you've looked at everything, but you didn't. Scan systematically. One hillside at a time, and scan in a grid pattern that will force you to cover every inch of ground on the hill. It takes a while to do that, and you'll see everything. When you finish, then you can scan randomly to check out areas a 2nd time if you want to.
 

evan williams

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2012
Messages
1,628
Location
Colorado Springs
I think a pad or something would help as far as the comfort side of things. "patience" with glassing for me just comes from a thought in the back of my head that I am missing something. I'll go over things a dozen times until I am satisfied. Its also a lot easier for me to sit and glass when I am seeing a lot of animals. I sat for over 8 hours one day in 2011 in Colorado because I saw 26 different bucks and 5 different bulls from one vantage point. And that made it easy to sit there where I could watch one animal for a long time judge him watch him bed and make decisions from there.
 
Top