Wrap and fletching color?

cali_hornhunter

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Anyone think that bright colored Fletcher's and wrap catch the animals eyes and makes you stick out like a sore thumb just curious I've seen guys with like a camo cover for the arrows to hide the color of fletching but from my experience it hasn't affected me getting up close with the game. Your thoughts?

This is my color yellow tiger stripped
 

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cali_hornhunter

cali_hornhunter

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Hiding them is so the humans don't find us. Game animals don't care.

Haha great point I wanted to see everyone's thoughts on this as I don't think it matters but I've seen hunters with something covering their fletching to hide the color which to me would get in the way and be a pain in the a$$
 

jmez

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I have been running all white or two white and a red for years. I don't think it has ever caused and issue with game, or gotten me busted. I don't even worry about it.
 

CaseyU

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I run flo pink ones and a white wrap. After watching my fiancees arrows at a couple 3d shoots. They are easy for my eyes to follow.
 

Lawnboi

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neon yellow wraps with neon yellow fletchings. Might start using 1 pink in there to mix it up, not to mention you can easily pick pink out in just about any setting.

I don't hide mine at all. I guess a guy could use dark colors but then again id much rather find my arrow after a shot.
 

OR Archer

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I usually use a 4" white wrap. Always changing up my vane colors. Currently 2 flo red and a white.

As far as animals picking up on your fletching I just don't buy into that. I've used a fletching cover and it made no difference on the animals picking up my movements.
 

BSeals71

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I think a deer, sheep or elk is more likely to catch your body movement than the colors of fletching vanes in the quiver. I use bright yellow 2" blazers also. Read a lot up on deer vision a firmly believe they see in yellows & blues

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1362056107.517447.jpg
 

Bigfeet

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Alberta
I would agree, to a point, that bright fletches are usually no problem while hunting. However, I would point out that most game animals do have a flight response to a light color. The tail end of sheep, mulies, elk, antelope and (of course) whitetails are a light color. There are probably two reasons for this - one is the herding response of many of these animals. A light colored behind makes it easier for the members of the group to follow each other - particularly in lower light conditions - which helps a group of animals to keep in touch visually with each other.
A light colored behind flashing also quickly catches the attention of other animals in the area, which can trigger a flight response. With whitetails the flash of the tail can be an altruistic response to danger, which alerts any other deer in the area. The same applies, although to a lesser degree, to antelope (probably mulie, sheep and elk too), in terms of the flaring of the white rump hair to signify danger. A flashing light colored rump, or even a light colored rump moving quickly, is quite visible to other animals and can be a warning of possible danger.
I have hunted with partners that have used all white fletch, and the movement of that white fletch (when we are separated) is the way I can most often pick them up in the woods. Makes me think animals can see that too and, since white can be the color of danger in the woods for many ungulates, it might be best to stay away from all white fletch. This is by no means definitive, but thought I would bring this up as something to consider.
 

Justin Crossley

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I don't think the bright fletching is a problem but I have seen the shafts of arrows reflecting like a mirror.
Last year my brother was stalking a group of bucks and I was guiding him with the spotting scope. I kept seeing a flash from his back (his bow was still strapped on)
and I finally realized that is was his arrow shafts in his quiver.
He uses a dull carbon arrow so I found this pretty suprizing.
 

ohhiitznik

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I have 2 whites and a Flo Yellow with no wrap. Only 3 of those arrows left though so when I get some new ones I'm not sure what I'll do. Probably Flo green or Flo pink
 
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cali_hornhunter

cali_hornhunter

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Thanks for the input guys I'm gonna be going with a pink and white combo on my next set of arrows which will be my first ones being built by me
 

evan williams

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The brighter the better! I want to find my arrow after the shot! Pinks, Yellows, Greens, White are what i stick with depending on what im hunting and where.
 

Jared Bloomgren

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Whites and reds have been a favorite of mine. Flo orange, green, and yellow too!
 

Soutie

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hey Evan - how do you pick colors for what and where?

I just pick colors for fun looks and easy to find although I have wondered what the animal sees before they get nailed. I think sometimes the sound is more of an issue. Not sure though.
 

sk1

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hey Evan - how do you pick colors for what and where?

I just pick colors for fun looks and easy to find although I have wondered what the animal sees before they get nailed. I think sometimes the sound is more of an issue. Not sure though.

im not evan but here are my common sense thoughts on that

maybe avoid your greens if much of your hunting is early season when trees, grass, and leaves are green....possibly avoid your oranges and reds during the fall with the leaves turning and on the ground, also if you use red it makes it more difficult to examine the blood on your arrow. i was going to go with white to really see blood on the arrow after a shot, but i do lots of late season hunting in the snow.....good luck finding it in the snow with a 6 inch white wrap and fletchings, especially if there isn't blood all over it.

i decided to go with flo yellow wraps and fletchings, although i can see why many people choose pink.....would work well for all seasons also.
 
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