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  1. #41
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    Kindo-
    Youíve got to make the tent, mine was a great project and learning experience for me. It is all finished up, including seam sealing. I made a stuff sack for it and with some guy line in there, it all weighs 3 lbs. The only thing I wish Iíd done differently (so far) is to have made the vent hoods a little longer. Once I got it pitched, I could see that the hoods (particularly one) could be insufficient in a meaningful storm with heavy wind.

    As for the silicone idea, looks like youíve got some good answers already. For me, I think the time of applying it and waiting to dry would be the killer. Also, I agree that it could gunk up your needle which turns into a huge pain. As my build continued on, I used pins and clamps less and less. Iíd put a few here and there if I really needed ďhelpĒ keeping a starting point how/where I wanted, but I found out that I could manage the material well enough by hand without any real issue.

    I need to get more picture up and see if I can replace some of the others that photobuket hosed me on. Iím not sure Iíve got any specific to the peak reinforcement, but Iíll try and at least explain what I did. Warning, though-itís VERY possible that itís not the best way to go...

    When the peak gets all sewn together with the wall panels, you end up with a mini mess. To start with, I pushed the peak material down towards the inside a bit so that things were pretty even and then ran several lines of stitching straight across, back and forth. I then cut off the very end above that point. It left a fairly ďneatĒ appearance from the outside and I noticed it was very similar to what Iíd seen on my buddyís SL-5. I used a piece of heavier material I ordered from RSBTR (Iíll need to look up what it was) and cut a circle. Unfortunately, it had some costing that wasnít the same as silpoly/silnylon and thereís not a great way to seal the two together. Otherwise, Iíd planned on using seam sealer to ďglueĒ it to the inside of the peak and later stitch it in. Instead, I put it in and stitched up each of the wall seams from the edge of the circle up towards the peak. I later went back and stitched just a bit in from the edge of the circle all the way around. I didnít end up putting another piece on the outside-I wanted the seam sealer to be sure and take well. Guessing a best practice kind of thing would be to have planned better and used some material that would have been compatible with the silicone seam sealer and glue them on both inside and out, then stitch afterwards.

    Hope that helps you out. Iím currently building my cylinder stove and plan to get it burned in inside the tent this weekend. Guess weíll see how well it all goes.


    Jeremy
    Last edited by gudspelr; 10-05-2017 at 08:46 AM.

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  3. #42
    Member Kindo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gudspelr View Post
    Kindo-
    Youíve got to make the tent, mine was a great project and learning experience for me. It is all finished up, including seam sealing. I made a stuff sack for it and with some guy line in there, it all weighs 3 lbs. The only thing I wish Iíd done differently (so far) is to have made the vent hoods a little longer. Once I got it pitched, I could see that the hoods (particularly one) could be insufficient in a meaningful storm with heavy wind.

    As for the silicone idea, looks like youíve got some good answers already. For me, I think the time of applying it and waiting to dry would be the killer. Also, I agree that it could gunk up your needle which turns into a huge pain. As my build continued on, I used pins and clamps less and less. Iíd put a few here and there if I really needed ďhelpĒ keeping a starting point how/where I wanted, but I found out that I could manage the material well enough by hand without any real issue.

    I need to get more picture up and see if I can replace some of the others that photobuket hosed me on. Iím not sure Iíve got any specific to the peak reinforcement, but Iíll try and at least explain what I did. Warning, though-itís VERY possible that itís not the best way to go...

    When the peak gets all sewn together with the wall panels, you end up with a mini mess. To start with, I pushed the peak material down towards the inside a bit so that things were pretty even and then ran several lines of stitching straight across, back and forth. I then cut off the very end above that point. It left a fairly ďneatĒ appearance from the outside and I noticed it was very similar to what Iíd seen on my buddyís SL-5. I used a piece of heavier material I ordered from RSBTR (Iíll need to look up what it was) and cut a circle. Unfortunately, it had some costing that wasnít the same as silpoly/silnylon and thereís not a great way to seal the two together. Otherwise, Iíd planned on using seam sealer to ďglueĒ it to the inside of the peak and later stitch it in. Instead, I put it in and stitched up each of the wall seams from the edge of the circle up towards the peak. I later went back and stitched just a bit in from the edge of the circle all the way around. I didnít end up putting another piece on the outside-I wanted the seam sealer to be sure and take well. Guessing a best practice kind of thing would be to have planned better and used some material that would have been compatible with the silicone seam sealer and glue them on both inside and out, then stitch afterwards.

    Hope that helps you out. Iím currently building my cylinder stove and plan to get it burned in inside the tent this weekend. Guess weíll see how well it all goes.


    Jeremy
    Oh, I'll definitely be doing it. I'm up in WI and just got back from out west a week or so ago and our fall is just getting rolling here, so this project may sit on the back-burner or at least I might just pick at it a bit here and there. I have another question though. I'm currently on the fence between making the pyramid design or going the Teepee route. In hindsight, do you have any thoughts on that? I see Beendare pursued some ideas that I've also kicked around in regards to a design so I may pick his brain too. Thanks!

  4. #43
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    Itís a good question-mid be the more circular tipi. I havenít spent any nights in either, so take this all with a grain of salt...


    From what I understand, a tipi can shed the wind better because of its shape. The mid has the big triangular sides that can really catch the wind, from what I understand. Although, Iíve heard some say that the circular footprint of the tipi can leave you with some more unusable space. With the square mid footprint, I can put someone on each wall and gear can fit in the corners. I ended up putting some guy out points on the walls of my mid, but I feel like the corner ones I added later (thanks to a suggestion from someone here) are what I really think help. I had it up in the back yard with some decent winds going. Enough that it wanted to flatten/bow in the lower portion of the wall. Having it staked down and just the corners guyed out kept the whole thing pretty darned stable.

    I considered a sod skirt and briefly even thought about what it might look like to do something of a lower wall of about 18Ē. In the end, I wanted to go with something that was more simple. And I think that was one of the big reasons I didnít try the tipi. The mid was just so straight forward in regards to figuring out the pieces. Roll out the material and cut it to the length of the wall (from base to peak height + seam allowance). Then, mark it diagonally from corner to corner and cut. (If your material has a different finish on the two sides, alternate which side is up as you make the diagonal cuts, this will allow you to have all the same sides showing inside and out-I cut them all and stacked them so I knew everything was going to work.) You now place one piece down with another so both vertical edges of the two right triangles are touching. Sew it together and thatís one wall. Thereís no fabric waste and your square footprint is easy to figure out-itís basically twice the width of your fabric, minus seam allowances.

    I think tipis are pretty cool, but I just didnít want to figure out all the angles, measurements, and cuts to go into making one. Plus, I knew it would be more sewing because there are more panels. Basically, Iím a little lazy . Same thing behind not trying to add in a little vertical wall at the bottom. I tried to keep it all fairly simple and straightforward-what seemed to work for others. It also helped that a friend has an SL-5 that he let me take a look at for thoughts/ideas before I started my build.

    Not sure if that helps you at all or not. But I hope it at least gives a little insight. I burned my stove in today and I have to say-Iím finding myself a little bewildered that in a week, Iíll be on the mountain with my boy and weíll be sleeping in quilts I made, inside a tent I made, staying warm and a stove I made. Itís a little surreal. I canít wait to see what you come up with. Any reasonably decent idea I had was pretty well completely plagiarized.....


    Jeremy

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