Boot suggestion?

UglyJow

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So I've always been a trail runner guy, but I've started incorporating heavy weight pack training into my fitness regiment. A few days ago I did a 900+ ft per mile ascent in the rain on the AT for the first time carrying 50+lbs. Never had a problem on flatter tracks with that weight, but the ascent and mud made me very conscious of how little support trail runnners give, so I need a boot, I think.

I'm in VA, and the boot will be used most often training in warm weather, and my feet generally run hot, so I am definitely going with an uninsulated boot.

My thought run towards one of three options from Crispi: the Nevada, the Wyoming, or the Dakota. I think I want one with a PU midsole for longevity, which is why I'm not considering the Summit currently. Also want the ABSS. The boot needs to breathe as well as possible, but still remain warm for winter use here in VA. Finally, I'd like to hear opinions on the PU leather rand of the Dakota vs. the rubber rand of the other two boots. I had really started to lean towards the Dakota till I heard the CrispiUS guy on a GB podcast state that the Dakota really was a hiking boot as opposed to a hunting boot, which scared me off a little as I am unsure what he was implying by that statement.

I know no boot does everything, but I'm looking to get one that is good in most situations because I can only afford one nice boot, unfortunately. Any opinions on the three boots here, or any other boot by Crispi or another manufacturer that may fit the bill would be greatly appreciated!
 

280twoeighty

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I have a great boot for sale. It is a Scarpa size 10. (Eur43)

Not sure on the model. Fuego maybe. Tremendous boot. Just a tad small. You can buy three pair of quality used boots with tons of life left in them for the price of one new. Rokslide is a great source for quality used boots.

Sorry, not help on Crispi.

Good luck
 
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UglyJow

UglyJow

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Crispi suggested the Dakota. Anyone run these yet? I know they are new for 2017.
 

Jason Snyder

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I have not worn them yet, but am going to order a pair of them very soon. I have worn the Idahos, and was going to go with the Wyoming until I saw the Dakota.

I guess it depends on what you're looking for? I like an all leather boot. Fewer seams, little to no fabric. As far as the treated leather rand? I spend a LOT of time in the rocks. I spend about 30 days a year hunting chukars in the basalt cliffs. It's brutal on boots. Based on discussions with Kendall at Black Ovis, he feels the Dakotas will stand up to it.
 

twall13

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My initial take on the hiking boot vs. hunting boot comment is that most hikers stay on trails. Hunting, on the other hand, often has you off the trail systems so hunting boots need to be able to handle a little extra wear and tear that way. Either type of boot should be fine as far as support goes. If you are looking at breathability I'd comment that the full leather boots like the Nevada probably won't breath quite as well and on top of that I believe the Nevada has some insulation in it. I own some Crispi Hunter's and they breath remarkably well for what they are, but hiking in the heat I notice they are insulated. On the flip side, the full leather boots typically have fewer seams and are a bit more durable. It all depends on what your priorities are.
 

Ross

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The Nevada is a great boot but does have 200 gr of insulation. I found them to be ok heat wise until the mid 70s. See my review on wear and abuse they held up to. A boot that offers great ankle support, waterproof and comfort right out of the box.
 
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UglyJow

UglyJow

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They are actually offering the Nevada in a non-insulated version for 2017 which is the one I was looking at. Anyone have any comments on the rubber vs. PU leather rand? I know the rubber is traditional, and it appears to be found in the more expensive offerings from Crispi, but it seems to me the PU leather rand would be the better option from a durability standpoint?
 

Jason Snyder

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Rubber is probably less susceptible to cuts than that treated leather. Unless you're spending a large amount of your time in the shale, I doubt it would be an issue.

The non-insulated Nevada is very appealing, but the weight of the Dakota is very appealing also. About 40% lighter. That's a big deal.
 

Davebuech

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Just got my new Nevada's yesterday. The rand is rubber on the non insulated version not PU coated leather

They are actually offering the Nevada in a non-insulated version for 2017 which is the one I was looking at. Anyone have any comments on the rubber vs. PU leather rand? I know the rubber is traditional, and it appears to be found in the more expensive offerings from Crispi, but it seems to me the PU leather rand would be the better option from a durability standpoint?
 
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UglyJow

UglyJow

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Just got my new Nevada's yesterday. The rand is rubber on the non insulated version not PU coated leather

Yes, I was asking for comparison of the non-insulated Nevada (rubber rand) vs the Dakota (PU leather). How do you like the new Nevada? I've narrowed down to Nevada vs Dakota now, leaning towards Dakota.
 

DesertAssassin

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I picked up the dakota last week and finally got out in them this weekend. I live in AZ so it was mid 80's on my hike. Day one was 5.5 mies with 60lb pack 2k elevation. Day two was a quick 2.5 mile 1500 with no weight. They performed great, I was a little worried with how soft/sticky the sole is that it may not hold up to the rock in the south west but so far its good. The boots breath well but the ABSS will make them feel a little hot at times, that said when your side hilling with weight or a rock slips under your boot you'll be happy you've got it. I don't know anything about the PU vs rubber rand, this is my first expensive boot, I am not too worried about the PU leather because I've used boots without any rand before the dakotas. I am planning to get a thicker insole because my foot is short, I guess, the width is great but I have to tighten the laces more than I like to on a boot. Last thing on size I wear 44.5 in my running and biking shoes I sized up to a 45 like I have done with my previous boots but in the end I had to go with my true 44.5. Maybe that will save you shipping cost.
 

541hunter

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I put 15 miles with about a 35lb pack on a new pair of crispi nevadas (insulated version) this weekend. Loved them. It was in the mid 70's all weekend. My feet definitely sweated but not near as much as I expected. When I setup camp, I just took off my boots and let everything air out a bit; which is normal operating procedure for me anyways. I chose this boot because I could only afford one boot for September through December hunting in Oregon.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Davebuech

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UglyJow. Sorry I missed your question.
The boot is a very high quality boot and built well. I worked in the leather industry for 26 years, spent many days touring shoe factories. I know good leather and shoe construction. Fit is the most important thing for any boot...if it don't fit, no matter the quality, they won't work! My feet tend to run on the narrow side. I have found Lowa's to fit my feet the best and this is my first pair of Crispi's. The un insulated Nevada runs true to size but is a smidgin wider than my Lowa last. Right outta the box my heel slipped a bit in the back. Not a lot but it was noticeable. I switched out the insole for the Synergy's and played with the lacing to get them dialed. My right foot is a half size smaller than my left so I have always had to deal with that but the combination of the new insole and the lacing has gotten out most all of the heel slip on the right, the left is a perfect fit. The Crispi's have a little more room in the toe box than my Tech Lite's and they are not as stiff. Exactly what I was looking for. I haven't a lot of miles on em yet and time will tell, but overall I am very pleased with this boot. It was exactly what I was looking for.

Yes, I was asking for comparison of the non-insulated Nevada (rubber rand) vs the Dakota (PU leather). How do you like the new Nevada? I've narrowed down to Nevada vs Dakota now, leaning towards Dakota.
 
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UglyJow

UglyJow

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So I just couldn't make up my mind and ordered both. Here they are out of the box:

image by twillightkids, on Flickr

image by twillightkids, on Flickr

I am still in a quandary though. I'm strongly leaning towards the Nevada for several reasons:

1. I find them more aesthetically pleasing; the Dakota's remind me of a skiing boot and I prefer the traditional look of the Nevada.

2. I prefer the full leather nature of the Nevada and that the leather is a bit thicker which would extend the use of the boot into later season here in VA.

3. In a phone call with Gary's Shoes in Utah, the owner recommended the Nevada over the Dakota for durability and longevity; he stated that he felt the Nevada was a better value shoe.

4. Again, Gary (sorry, unsure of his last name) suggested that my worry over the durability of the rubber rand on the Nevada was a non issue. Any damage (which he felt would be minimal given the terrain I will use the boots in) would be cosmetic and easily repairable.

My issue with the Nevada now is an issue of fit. This is actually true of both pairs of boots; my left foot is close to a size larger than my right foot, and although the left foot feels great in both boots, the right boot seems to be slipping a bit in the heel and I am afraid would lead to major heel issues in the field. With the Dakota I can really crank down on the lacing and minimize the slipping while maintaining comfort. Unfortunately with the Nevada, if I lace the boot tightly I can get the slipping down to a reasonable level, but the cost is a significant amount of pressure just above the inside ankle. This pressure point is uncomfortable from the get go and I think would be nearly unbearable after miles in the field under load. I do have green Superfeet in the boots now.

Davebuech, do you mind sharing the lacing technique you used to alleviate your similar issue? The kind of "pully" lacing system that I tried did help with the heel slippage, but the tension point for tightening down on the boot with that system sits right over (and probably is the cause) for the pressure point described earlier. I'd love to see other possible options that I could try.

If I can solve the heel slipping and the pressure point with insoles/lacing I'm keeping the Nevada; otherwise I will reluctantly return the Nevada and keep the Dakota. I actually think the Dakota is a fine boot and would work well for me, but it is definitely not as appealing to me as the Nevada, unfortunately.

Also, one of the Nevada boots has a few cosmetic issues. A loose stitch:

image by twillightkids, on Flickr

And what looks like an overrunning of glue from the rand?

image by twillightkids, on Flickr

I expect some imperfections in a hand made product, and these don't really bother me, but would others here consider these minor defects or something that would be returnable?
 

DesertAssassin

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REI_Expert_Advice-Boot_Lacing_Tips.jpg
My right foot is also smaller than my left. I did have to tighten them a bunch which is why I'm going to try new insoles in my Dakotas.
 

Benjblt

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I bought the Dakota and I like it a lot. I think it is going to be a perfect balance of durability, weight, and support. I had some heal rubbing right off the bat but i learned to lock in my heel with the laces and I think I solved my problem.
 

Davebuech

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"Davebuech, do you mind sharing the lacing technique you used to alleviate your similar issue? The kind of "pully" lacing system that I tried did help with the heel slippage, but the tension point for tightening down on the boot with that system sits right over (and probably is the cause) for the pressure point described earlier. I'd love to see other possible options that I could try."

I will try my best. Don't think I've ever tried to explain it, especially in writing....here goes

The way I lace mine is not to go real tight on the toe box, all the way up to the last set of loops, just snug em up to that point. Then I pull pretty firm to set the first of the hook eyes into place, pulling the heel down and back. I bend my ankle forward as I do this and as I hit the next hook, set it firmly as I push my toes up in the boot. This causes the heel to rest as far back as possible. Be careful as you lace to adjust the gusseting around the tongue of the shoe so that you don't get any pressure point across the lace across the top of the foot as you tighten em and the gusset is even on both sides. Also I don't go so tight as to put pressure on the ankle bone. I go across the hook that keeps the tongue in place and into the last set of hook eyes and tie em up.

Don't know if this makes sense or not? Maybe I should try video!?
 
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UglyJow

UglyJow

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Video might help. It sounds like you are standard lacing but using your ankle angle to get the right tension at different points of the lacing?
 
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