CORE Training - new twist to old exercise

G Posik

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Mar 1, 2012
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Some of you might already know and do this, but here goes. I have been changing up some of my workouts overall. I started looking for something different on the core side. So what I have done is just taking some of my normal exercises and slowing the rate down. As an example just take a regular sit up, instead of doing it at normal speed, take 3-4 times longer to do a rep. If you were doing 100 sit ups, that number will drop. I have been doing this the last week and a half and can tell a difference. I am doing this on all of my core exercises. Give it a try you might like it.

Glenn
 

jmez

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Do it with weightlifting as well. If you go slow, use proper form, and take momentum out of the equation you aren't nearly as strong as you may think.

Try slow pullups with full extension on each one.
 

MLHSN

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May 15, 2013
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Ya, that's because your muscle is in a constant state of flex. Generally, you will have a slight rest at the start and finish of a rep so the slow motion keeps your muscle working longer and faster to fatigue.

Another good twist is to work one part of your body while holding a static position with other. For example, if you are doing curls or even military press, squat and hold that position while you do your reps. Then you are working your quads and biceps/shoulders at the same time. It also get's your heart rate up faster because your working two different muscle groups at the same time.
 

unm1136

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I am finally re-starting Convict Conditioning and it emphasizes 2 seconds to get into position, a second there, and a second to move back to the starting position. I will let you know....
I recall in the Academy that when we were dropped for pushups being forced to stop our rep in the down position and hold it until the instrctors got tired weally smoked us.

pat
 

Eagle

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It depends on what you're training for. If you want to have slower reaction times, that's fine, but for fast twitch, explosive fiber recruitment, training slow isn't the best bet. To each their own, there is a place for isometric holds and such, but I don't feel its more beneficial over all than thinking about moving with speed and a purpose, while maintaining form.
 

unm1136

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It depends on what you're training for. If you want to have slower reaction times, that's fine, but for fast twitch, explosive fiber recruitment, training slow isn't the best bet. To each their own, there is a place for isometric holds and such, but I don't feel its more beneficial over all than thinking about moving with speed and a purpose, while maintaining form.

When I start to get tired I tend to rely on momentum. Right now slowing down is just what the doctor ordered.

pat
 

Eagle

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When I start to get tired I tend to rely on momentum. Right now slowing down is just what the doctor ordered.

pat

A good way to determine when to stop your sets is bar speed. Once the bar slows down, and you can't move it with decent speed, then the set should be finished. This applies to anything, but especially the big three; bench, deads, squats and even shoulder press. Once that bar slows down greatly, your likely to do more damage than good.
 

Eagle

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Just to add some clarification to the above, static holds in the top or bottom position of a lift can be very beneficial, but once you start moving the bar again, it should be with good speed. For example, holding in the bottom of a squat or bench (pause squat or pause bench) can help and really change the bodies response to the lift. When I'm talking about moving with speed, I'm talking about during the concentric portion of the lift, just to be clear, being controlled in the eccentric phase of the lift is very important to keep you from relying on momentum to move the weight.
 

unm1136

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This year I am bodyweight only. I notice that I fatigue faster with fewer reps when I go slowly. Working towards multiple one armed pushups, press flags, and pistols. Doc wants me heavy cardio and trainer suggested the slow bodyweight stuff to maintain muscle mass. I have noted some strength gains and better flexability with what I am currently doing. When the doc gives me the Ok I will start lifting again.

pat
 

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