Hammock vs tent

Gapmaster

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Dec 22, 2019
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238
Location
Arkansas
Quick question for you guys. I’ve always been a solo tent guy, and have an excellent setup that’s lightweight. But I purchased a couple hammocks a year or so ago and we use them on overnight kayak trips during the spring and summer. I’ve got the tarp, net and everything. How hard would it be to convert to a hammock setup for September & October elk hunts? Obviously I’d need a new sleeping bag as my current one is a BA without insulation in the bottom.

Should I stick to what I got or try and go even lighter?? How much does your sleep system and your shelter weight? Thanks
 

bwhntMT

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Feb 3, 2018
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235
Location
SLC Area Utah
If you are going to do a hammock setup for September or October, I would take a serious look at hammock quilts, rather than trying to make a sleeping bag work. You won't find a sleeping bag that will be able to keep you warm underneath in a hammock once temps get below 50 or 40. I have done the hammock and tarp thing down to single digits, and it works, but I find that once it gets into the 30's, I just prefer a tent. Gives me room to mess with my stuff inside vs under a tarp., can cook in there if I have to, etc. I sleep better in a hammock, but the convenience of the tent in the cooler months has me reaching for it come Sept and Oct.

A far as weight, my hammock, suspension, tarp, and quilts set-up runs around 5-6 lbs total weight. I don't have a true lightweight setup for my tent yet. Working on that.
 
OP
Gapmaster

Gapmaster

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Joined
Dec 22, 2019
Messages
238
Location
Arkansas
If you are going to do a hammock setup for September or October, I would take a serious look at hammock quilts, rather than trying to make a sleeping bag work. You won't find a sleeping bag that will be able to keep you warm underneath in a hammock once temps get below 50 or 40. I have done the hammock and tarp thing down to single digits, and it works, but I find that once it gets into the 30's, I just prefer a tent. Gives me room to mess with my stuff inside vs under a tarp., can cook in there if I have to, etc. I sleep better in a hammock, but the convenience of the tent in the cooler months has me reaching for it come Sept and Oct.

A far as weight, my hammock, suspension, tarp, and quilts set-up runs around 5-6 lbs total weight. I don't have a true lightweight setup for my tent yet. Working on that.
I was wondering if the 1-2 lbs I would save in weight was worth losing the convenience of the tent. I do enjoy the hammock during the spring and summer. I have just never tried it in the fall. Thanks for the input.
 

Apollo117

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Jan 22, 2018
Messages
454
If you try the hammock, you will want an underquilt when the temperature gets close to freezing.
 

Staghorn

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Feb 9, 2017
Messages
12
You can likely keep your bag if it’s warm enough, a regular bag will just compress. You need an under quilt below the hammock. Finding a way to block the wind below you also goes a long way.

I’m not super experienced with cold weather hammocks, because by the time I made it work, the weight was up there. Hammocks have other advantages though.
 

PlanoDano

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Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
60
A livable hammock setup for fall is going to be a little heavier than a ground setup. Some are going to find an advantage in comfort with a hammock. Where hammocks excel are in those places without level or uncluttered ground as long as there are proper trees. Where hammocks lack is in an environment without suitable trees. I have both and carry a ground system most of the time.
 

Hogyotedeer

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Joined
Mar 15, 2019
Messages
109
Each year of advancing age makes crawling in and out of a tent more difficult. Putting on boots or pants from a hammock beats laying on my back and trying. On the other hand my jacket and boots ( I ride a motorcycle and camp) are outside in a plastic contractor's garbage bag. I left a pair of pants in the chair overnight recently and when I put them on in the morning, they were full of ants. Also at certain times, the only camping available is an open field. Given a choice the good of hammock outweighs the bad, but there are times the only choice is go to the ground or don't go.
 

TXSTDU

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
19
I have camped in mine into the 30's. I have a good sleeping back and a small quilt I use when I camp. I also try and run a small fire next to my hammock and it really seems to help.

I wouldn't trade my hammock for any tent again; it's too comfortable, compactable, and light.
 
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