How long can a recurve be strung?

AKMAN

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I came across one of my wishlist bows for sale this weekend, an early 55# Hatfield Take Down with the grey riser, and didn't think much of it at the time, but in hindsight, remembered that it was strung and hanging up.
The guy has had the bow for nearly a year, and I'm doubtful it's been un-strung at any point he's had it.

The price seems right but not if there will have been any long term damage to the bow. Truth be told I'd rather have a 45 or 50# but the 55# WOULD be pretty close at 27-27.5 inches.

Can being strung for extended periods cause damage to the bow??
Anything I can look for that could indicate a problem or should I just steer clear and keep hunting for one?
 

Felix40

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Being strung is not a problem at all. Probably preferable actually because the current owner hasnt used improper stringing technique which could potentialy but rarely cause limb twist. The thing to look out for is guys who leave them strung and standing up in the corner or in a hot or humid garage.

Things to look for: Tiller can be checked using an arrow. Measure the distance from the limb to the string at the top and bottom of the riser. These should be equal or within 1/8". Also look for cracks or milky looking glass in the limbs. And finally look down the string from limb tip to limb tip and try to tell if there is any limb twist.

All in all these bows are waaay more durable than we give them credit for.
 

Texasraised

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Dec 23, 2012
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Glass bows have a much higher tolerance to being left strung.
I would be willing to bet that it hasn't lost ANY weight, let alone 5 pounds.
My father has a recurve that has been strung for several years and it still weighs the same as the day he bought it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

PJG

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Feb 14, 2014
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This is a very subjective topic, I've had bowyers tell me to leave the bow strung, never unstring them. A lot of twisted limbs have been the result of improper stringing.

I've had others tell me to unstring each day, all of these have had bamboo cores.

Personally I don't ever unstring the bow I am shooting, my current one only gets unstrung to swap strings or change the brace height. It's stayed strung for a couple years now.

Really what you need to look for is that the string tracks in the center of the limb/riser while being drawn back. Also, check the poundage to make sure it's within a couple pounds of the marked weight. Also, make sure their are no "bubbles" or checking in the glass on both sides of the limbs.
 

Steve O

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Agree totally with PJG. 100x more chance of damage string and unstringing than leaving strung.
 

Beendare

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I've got ILF bows that have been strung for years and tho i've never measured performance differences....they don't seem to have lost a step.

The string follow bows....all wood with no carbon or glass are notorious for losing performance if you keep them strung.
 
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AKMAN

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Thanks all. I've basically made up my mind that I'll own the Hatfield T/D when I get back to town from work. :cool:

Also, thanks for the inspection tips. They seem obvious but never would have thought to do a few.
 

Ray

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I really like my early 90's Hatfield T/D. Well made and affordable bow.
 
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