Kifaru Sleeping Bags

big10hunter

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Aug 21, 2012
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I do not see a lot of posts about anyone using a Kifaru bag. I am thinking about getting one over a down bag. Is this a mistake?
 

armyjoe

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I don't think its a mistake. I'm actually going to be picking one of these up some time this season too. Super light and the rhino skin is tough as nails. Great synthetic bag!
 

Darren Best

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It's a mixed bag, yes they are great and work as advertised, but lose loft and thus warmth so you either have to overshoot your temp ratings or replace it more often.

We have 4 of the 0 degree bags in this family and all are still holding up really well, they are three years old, two of those being used by teenage boys. You can crawl into them wet and you will get warm and dry out at the same time. The bag can also get wet and dries easily. They have been used nearly every month year round, but I have to supplement mine in the winter months with a Woobie to stay warm.

Having to overshoot your temp ratings of course makes the bag heavier and bulkier, ours weigh right at 3 pounds. Considering I can get a water resistant down bag rated at 10 degrees and weighs 1-1/2 pounds and doesn't have to be replaced so often, I think I won't be buying synthetic again.
 

littlebuf

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if I was buying a synthetic bag it would be the slick bag. I almost did,im glad I didn't...
 

luke moffat

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Feb 24, 2012
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I have a couple quilts, couple down bags, and a couple synthetic bags. That said if I were forced to consolidate down to just one sleeping bag or quilt for all my hunting/backpacking it'd be a 0 degree Kifaru slick bag for sure!!!
 

dotman

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It's a mixed bag, yes they are great and work as advertised, but lose loft and thus warmth so you either have to overshoot your temp ratings or replace it more often.

We have 4 of the 0 degree bags in this family and all are still holding up really well, they are three years old, two of those being used by teenage boys. You can crawl into them wet and you will get warm and dry out at the same time. The bag can also get wet and dries easily. They have been used nearly every month year round, but I have to supplement mine in the winter months with a Woobie to stay warm.

Having to overshoot your temp ratings of course makes the bag heavier and bulkier, ours weigh right at 3 pounds. Considering I can get a water resistant down bag rated at 10 degrees and weighs 1-1/2 pounds and doesn't have to be replaced so often, I think I won't be buying synthetic again.

I would think it would be hard to find any bag that is as good as new after 4 years of constant use. I think that just shows how good it is, most may only use their bag 3 or 4 months a year which means it would be at the point your bags are in 16 years.
 

littlebuf

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Have you used the quilt long term yet?



I use multiple sleeping bags and quilts...only reason I'm asking.

Well since I got the thing last week ill say no,no long term use.youll notice I didnt make any recommendation of another bag I said im glad I didnt go this route, synthetic that is.i feel you get more from down.I know ya got product to sell big guy,dont worry I wont badmouth kifaru,I love there stuff,just not synthetic bags.
 

Darren Best

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Dec 30, 2012
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The bags are only three years old and I noticed over a year ago that I was getting cold in mine. I did drop my coldest expected temp when I ordered them by 15 degrees, to date I don't think we have slept out in anything colder than 15. So that is a 15 degree margin and yet the loss of loft ate that up and more in one to two years.

Structurally they still look good, no rips, tears or stitching falling apart. I just don't want to be replacing a $350 bag every other year, nor do I want to get a -20 4lb bag that eats up half my pack space just to make it last a little longer.

Now had you asked me last year about my stance on synthetic vs. down I would of and did say quite often that in the wetter areas of the country, go synthetic always, but that was before water resistant down hit the market and without the realization that with constant use, you wear out a synthetic bag much faster than a down one.

Now all that being said I would not give my sons a down bag, no way no how, they just simply do not protect their gear like I do. We had four North Face down bags given to use by my father in law and I have used them on occasion, very very warm, too warm for anything other than cold weather. I have let my wife use one now and then if I was sure she could keep it dry, otherwise I tell her to take her Kifaru bag, but I have never let the boys use them.

So ask yourself these questions.

Do you live in the Cascades or Alaska or anyplace it rains a lot for days on end.

Are you kind of sloppy about keeping your gear dry.

Can you keep from stuffing it down as small as it will go, offhand guess for our bags I would say no smaller than 20 or 25 liters, 25 - 30 would be better. The less you stuff it small the longer it will last.

Are you okay with the extra weight and bulkiness of a synthetic bag.

Are you okay with replacing it more often.

If you answer yes to all or most of those questions, then get a synthetic and I believe and have for a long time that the Kifaru bags are the best synthetics on the market.

But my next bag will be water resistant down.
 

Aron Snyder

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Well since I got the thing last week ill say no,no long term use.youll notice I didnt make any recommendation of another bag I said im glad I didnt go this route, synthetic that is.i feel you get more from down.I know ya got product to sell big guy,dont worry I wont badmouth kifaru,I love there stuff,just not synthetic bags.

Oh believe me, I use EVERYONE'S bags, so this has nothing to do with Kifaru (ask anyone that's hiked/hunted with me).

I have however come close to freezing to death in a quilt and down bag, but I still use them. It will be cool to hear what you think of it in the long run.

I'm getting the feeling that people think I only use Kifaru gear, but again, anyone that goes with me will tell you that I use everything, I just prefer Kifaru for most things.
 

Darren Best

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Dec 30, 2012
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I think for anything below 40 you should be able to zip your bag shut to conserve heat.

A hybrid like what Zpacks offers is a great way to roll, unzip it for a quilt when it's warm, then when the temps drop, zip it shut like a regular bag to keep you warm.

The Jardines started the whole quilt revolution, but they state over and over that they sleep fully clothed when the mercury dips. Also their quilts are thicker and heavier than what anyone else makes and by quite a ways. His warmest quilt is only rated to 20 degrees and my 0 degree Kifaru slick bag doesn't loft anywhere close to his, even when it was new. So not only does he add more loft, he is very conservative with his temp ratings. I have no idea what insulation he uses, he hates the whole brand name marketing thing with a passion.
 

cmeier117

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Feb 24, 2012
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Salem, OR
I think for anything below 40 you should be able to zip your bag shut to conserve heat.

A hybrid like what Zpacks offers is a great way to roll, unzip it for a quilt when it's warm, then when the temps drop, zip it shut like a regular bag to keep you warm.

The Jardines started the whole quilt revolution, but they state over and over that they sleep fully clothed when the mercury dips. Also their quilts are thicker and heavier than what anyone else makes and by quite a ways. His warmest quilt is only rated to 20 degrees and my 0 degree Kifaru slick bag doesn't loft anywhere close to his, even when it was new. So not only does he add more loft, he is very conservative with his temp ratings. I have no idea what insulation he uses, he hates the whole brand name marketing thing with a passion.

I agree about zippin shut to conserve heat, but I like the quilt idea. Last year I used a Z packs 20 degree quilt I got a wide extra long and it weighs 21oz. It is nice because it has a low profile zipper that goes on the bottom and since I got the extra long version I can wrap around my head if need be. It also has no draft collar since the zipper is on the bottom. I never got below 30 degrees so I can't comment on rating but I fell in love with it last year. Only complaint is the foot box is not big enough.
 

coOverwatch

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Jun 30, 2012
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Elizabeth, CO
For the guys that say they need to replace there synthetic bags more often I ask how do you store them when not in use. Do you hang them loose or keep them in a stuff sack?
I ask as I have yet to pull the trigger on a new bag. Going back and forth on sewing my own or getting a 0* slick bag. I need two so I have yet to pull the trigger on spending $700 plus on these bags + waiting 6 – 8 weeks on delivery.
 

dotman

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Feb 24, 2012
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I keep mine in a dry cooler that is 120 qt, never leave any bag in a stuff sack long term.

My old Kifaru Base Bag(no longer made) is good as new and the 20* rating keeps me warm into the teens but we all are different.
 

akrdkill

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Feb 25, 2012
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Leave mine laid out flat on the floor in spare bedroom. Flip over fluff around once a month. Have a couple bags & tent that I keep on the floor
 

Backpack Hunter

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Feb 26, 2012
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Some wilderness area, somewhere
I like the Kifaru bags, have the 0 and 20degr bags. Both are true to temp for me, and can't say I have noticed any loss in temp rating. I prefer them to my Western Mountaineering, Mountain Hardwear, and Montbell bags.
 
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