Oregon blacktail

djprice91

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Apr 6, 2019
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Tree stands with salt and cameras, or rattle from the ground? Hunting late season bow
 

TripleJ

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Tree stands with salt and cameras, or rattle from the ground? Hunting late season bow
Treestands can be a really productive tactic for late season blacktails. From what I've seen, salt will be ineffective that time of the year. If you want to use an attractant, it's hard to beat a pile of apples (yes it's legal). Otherwise, concentrate on active trails between feeding/bedding transition areas. Rattling/calling from the ground can also be effective, but it can be very hit and miss. If you want to see some good blacktail treestand action videos, check out "Against the Wind" on YouTube. I don't know the guys, but they have some really good blacktail videos.
 

Dustin the wind

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If you are set on a treestand for blacktail it can and most likely will be frustrating for quite a while. Not saying it can't be done, blacktails a lot of times just don't follow those kinds of patterns in my exp unless you have property with some good feed on it. Granted I hunted mostly the Alsea and Mckenzie units. Just my 2 cents, but still hunting really would be my choice for hunting blacktails during any bow season in Oregon. Much easier to catch them in cuts, but putting a bow range stock on a buck in an open cut would usually be very difficult. If I was going to try it though, like stated above, a big pile of apples would be a great idea. I'd put them out days in advance and keep it supplied if I could before I got in the stand. Be ready to very possibly find a bear gorging on them in the dark.
 

Nate_Beres

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Mar 27, 2016
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Treestands can be a really productive tactic for late season blacktails. From what I've seen, salt will be ineffective that time of the year. If you want to use an attractant, it's hard to beat a pile of apples (yes it's legal). Otherwise, concentrate on active trails between feeding/bedding transition areas. Rattling/calling from the ground can also be effective, but it can be very hit and miss. If you want to see some good blacktail treestand action videos, check out "Against the Wind" on YouTube. I don't know the guys, but they have some really good blacktail videos.
A little off topic but the consensus is apple's are the best bait. I've got a tree in my yard but most have fallen and are rotting. Seems like theres a better way than hauling piles of them into the woods.
It seems like someone could take the pulp from a cider maker and press them into pellets with molasses or some other binder.
They could last all year long (ideally), fit into a feeder, and are easier to transport.
Any thoughts?

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Dustin the wind

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Jul 22, 2019
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A little off topic but the consensus is apple's are the best bait. I've got a tree in my yard but most have fallen and are rotting. Seems like theres a better way than hauling piles of them into the woods.
It seems like someone could take the pulp from a cider maker and press them into pellets with molasses or some other binder.
They could last all year long (ideally), fit into a feeder, and are easier to transport.
Any thoughts?

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
Well that process sounds like a lot of work as well, just not as heavy but certainly longer and more tedious. I would take those apples and throw them in a fridge or freezer until season. Doesn't have to be 80lbs of apples on your back, just enough to create a feeding habit in that spot.
 
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djprice91

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Thanks for the tips gents. I,ll probably try a combination of tree stand with apples and still hunting/rattling. Like the apples in a bag project! Maybe stump licker and some wet cob too.
 

TripleJ

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If you can keep the does coming around, sooner or later the bucks will show up.
 

Oregonboy

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Sep 19, 2019
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Hunt the rain and hunt it hard. I see the more blacktail movement when it's raining than at any other time.
 

Utmostpoet

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I was very fortunate to find this guy on Monday morning at sunrise. As stated above, trying to find patterns on these guys is super difficult. I have found what works best for me is trying to find where they come in and out of the cuts. Ideally finding routes that bring them to/from water, or alternate feed. I found this guy in a truly ideal spot that I will definitely continue to hunt in the future. Him and all his does were hanging out in the very bottom of a cut that had a couple hundred yards of timber between the bottom of the cut and a farmers field.
 

Supertrucker

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May 4, 2018
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I hunt the Cascade foothills and the deer there could care less about apples. I think if they don't know what they are they won't eat them. I've dumped buckets and buckets and the only thing I get to come is bears. I place trace mineral blocks out in early spring and get does and bucks almost non stop. The does like it because they are mineral depleted from being pregnant and the bucks need it while growing antlers. Once the bucks rub the velvet I rarely see them on my cameras until around Thanksgiving when the second rut starts and I think it's only cause the does are there.
 

TripleJ

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I hunt the Cascade foothills and the deer there could care less about apples. I think if they don't know what they are they won't eat them. I've dumped buckets and buckets and the only thing I get to come is bears. I place trace mineral blocks out in early spring and get does and bucks almost non stop. The does like it because they are mineral depleted from being pregnant and the bucks need it while growing antlers. Once the bucks rub the velvet I rarely see them on my cameras until around Thanksgiving when the second rut starts and I think it's only cause the does are there.
This is what I've seen also in the places I hunt up river in the Cascades. They won't touch apples, grain, or cob feed. They sure are a deer magnet down in lower elevations closer to the valley though.
 
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