Rain shells for moose/Alaska

tam9492

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Mar 21, 2016
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498
Have an upcoming DIY moose hunt, and I need to grab a new rain jacket. I need it anyway for my local hunting, but I want something up to the task of Alaska moose hunting. Prefer non-camo for everyday wear, and just as happy to look at non-hunting brands. A lot of lightweight options claim to be durable, but I have trouble trusting that. Thoughts/suggestions?
 

thinhorn_AK

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Jul 2, 2016
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You can get a grundens commercial fishing jacket for fairly cheap. I’ve used those with good success. I still take a breathable shell though, I know some guys are starting to be against the breathable stuff but if you’re being active at all it’s much better than a non breathable shell.
 

Alaskan89

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Oct 15, 2013
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Another huge fan of Impertech from Helly Hanson, it goes every where I go hunting or fishing, the only downfall to Impertech is if you do a lot of hiking you will sweat in them. That said, I still choose it over any other rain gear unless I'm doing a lightweight backpack hunt. I highly recommend the Guide jacket and bibs.
 
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tam9492

tam9492

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How heavy is the HH Impertech? I’m not too worried about sweat up there, but I would like something a little more technical/breathable for hunting in the lower 48. I don’t spend a lot of time in full-day rain or downpours.
 

Alaskan89

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Oct 15, 2013
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115
How heavy is the HH Impertech? I’m not too worried about sweat up there, but I would like something a little more technical/breathable for hunting in the lower 48. I don’t spend a lot of time in full-day rain or downpours.
It's not really that heavy but it is not breathable, most breathable rain gear doesn't work all that well when walking through thigh high brush when it's wet, btdt.
 

william schmaltz

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AK
The HH is surprisingly light weight. I only take the HH when moose hunting or fishing. Moose hunting I'm just sitting there or walking very little so it's nice that there are no weak spots for the wind or rain. I still take a Kuiu Chugach set backpack hunting and I think that's a perfect balance of weight and protection while living from a bag. Something similar to a Kuiu Yukon would probably work just fine, especially if you're in a heated tent. I just feel like the HH is so inexpensive and it's basically fool proof so why switch it up or beat up my expensive stuff.

You could probably buy a lighter set similar to Kuiu Chugach for hunting L48 and buy a set of HH for moose hunting and still be in it less $$$ than buying a set of something like the Yukon to do it all. Just food for thought since I don't know anything about what it's like where you're typically hunting.
 
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tam9492

tam9492

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Mar 21, 2016
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The HH is surprisingly light weight. I only take the HH when moose hunting or fishing. Moose hunting I'm just sitting there or walking very little so it's nice that there are no weak spots for the wind or rain. I still take a Kuiu Chugach set backpack hunting and I think that's a perfect balance of weight and protection while living from a bag. Something similar to a Kuiu Yukon would probably work just fine, especially if you're in a heated tent. I just feel like the HH is so inexpensive and it's basically fool proof so why switch it up or beat up my expensive stuff.

You could probably buy a lighter set similar to Kuiu Chugach for hunting L48 and buy a set of HH for moose hunting and still be in it less $$$ than buying a set of something like the Yukon to do it all. Just food for thought since I don't know anything about what it's like where you're typically hunting.
Great info!
 

Luke S

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Jul 7, 2019
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9
I come from an ultralight hiking background prior to hunting. The search for good rain gear is never ending.

If you go breathable look at the technical specs of the fabric. Some guys on a backpacking forum started looking at waterproof breathable fabric under a microscope. Basically they learned a couple things. First lighter fabrics get micro holes with use (abrasion, stretching etc). This probably contributes to some of the leaking reported. Second the Durable Water Repellent layer (DWR) runs off quite fast. A few days of bushwacking may be enough. Without the DWR breathability is compromised and you sweet more.

With all that going on its easy to get damp under a raincoat without really knowing why.

My solution for years was to get a $80 raincoat and just replace it as soon as it seemed to leak. Eventually I bought a $150 Goretex rain coat. BUT I made sure it was a more durable version of Goretex. Many of the newer versions sacrifice durability in favor of lighter weight or a higher breathability rating. Anyway that $150 coat has held up reasonably well. I've used it off and on since 2016 but not on every trip. I use a cheaper jacket on day trips. If you get Goretex look for 3 layer not 2.5.

My other strategy is to wear a tight fitting base layer that dries quickly. If it's cold I wear fleece over that. I get soggy eventually no matter what rain gear so that helps. I also wear a Goretex OR Sombrero waterproof hat. The hat goes on over the hood in heavy rain. It keeps water from coming in my face.

Well sorry for the novel. I still think WPB rain gear is better for active hiking in most cases. But I have considered the non breathable stuff myself for some situations. If its 45 degrees and you're bashing through soaking willows I don't know if WPB is doing much. Might be better just to go completely waterproof.
 
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tam9492

tam9492

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Mar 21, 2016
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I feel that non-rubber would suit my needs better for 90% of my hunting, but the HH is cheap enough that it’s a no-brainer to grab it too for my moose hunt.

Everything I read about breathable suggests 3 layers are need to really offer protection from the elements.
 
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