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Recommended Boots for Colorado Elk Hunt at 11,000 Ft.

#1
I'm planning a 2019 Elk hunt for the last week of September in SW part of Colorado in the Weminuche Wilderness and am looking for input on footwear.

I have pretty limited knowledge of quality hiking boots other than purchasing a pair of 9" Timberland Pro Ripsaws to hike in SE Oklahoma. These boots have been night and day different than the standard cowboy work boot I was wearing. LOL Fit and feel is great and the ankle support has kept me from turning an ankle multiple times. The drawbacks are they they are not holding up to the beating since it's extremely rocky in the areas I use them. Plus, they feel extremely heavy. Also, it may be because I'm somewhat new to mountain hiking but on pretty steep decents downhill my feet are on fire. That may be just the nature of hiking steep angles but I wasn't sure if that was a sign of the boots being to lose?

I'm looking for something more lightweight, waterproof, 8-9"+ for ankle support, and hopefully lighter. Being late September in Colorado I don't believe I will need any insulation. My plans are to find something the next month and use them while I'm getting in shape and I'll take my Timberland's as my backup boots.

Any suggestions as I read through other threads would be helpful!
 

fightthenoie

Well-known member
#2
Ultimately your feet should choose for you, so take a few suggestions from this thread (eventually) and order your size. Obviously you can’t totally evaluate them without hitting the mountain, but do what you can in the house. Everyone’s feet are different so it’s a matter of finding your own glass slipper.

My contribution to the pool are Crispi Lapponias and a pair of green super feet insoles. That’s been my go to boot for summer scouting up through September elk here in CO. Since you mentioned lightweight twice, I think they fit the bill ;)
 
#3
My contribution to the pool are Crispi Lapponias and a pair of green super feet insoles. That’s been my go to boot for summer scouting up through September elk here in CO. Since you mentioned lightweight twice, I think they fit the bill ;)
Thanks, I'll add that to the list to research. I'm fortunate to have access to properties in OK that have some mountain terrain so I'm planning on putting them through some paces to break them in. It's not Colorado but a couple 18-20 degree inclines with 400-600 ft of elevation change should be a good test.
 

Elkfitness

Well-known member
#4
You will get a lot of good suggestions. Key is to try on a bunch of boots as each brand fits different. Figure out if you need a narrow/ wide toe box or wide/narrow heal. In addition, make sure you eventually try the boots with weight on your back and on a hill. Being in the Midwest, find something steep and see how the boots feel going down hill and also side hill. That is where you will feel the slipping. If you have an REI near you, go try all of their high end backpacking boots. You can return them within a year if they are slipping or don’t fit right. That will save you a slot of money down the road. I’ve always ran superfeet insoles too, no matter what the boot.


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#5
If you have an REI near you, go try all of their high end backpacking boots. You can return them within a year if they are slipping or don’t fit right. That will save you a slot of money down the road. I’ve always ran superfeet insoles too, no matter what the boot.
That's good to know on REI...unfortunately I'm finding most of these quality boots are hard to find to try on. Closest REI is in Overland Park Kansas and I'll be up there in 3 weeks so I may just dedicate some extra time to spend there. Glad you mentioned it!
 

5MilesBack

Well-known member
#6
If I was going to buy a pair of archery elk hunting boots today, I would look at the Crispi Idaho's and the Zamberlan Lynx's. I love my Zamberlan Dakota's, but they stopped making them a few years ago. Thankfully I have two pair of them.

I like a lightweight boot at least 7" high that doesn't restrict my mobility at all. I find myself running up, down, and across slopes quite a bit during archery elk season. So while lightweight, I also like a little ankle support as well.
 
#7
Salomon Quest 4D. Super comfortable. Lightweight enough. Not going to have the ankle support of some of the others, but still sufficient IMO. For the price they're a heck of a boot. Worth trying if you can.
 
#8
All the Crispi boots have a flex rating? This is something I'll have to research more, but is there a common knowledge to stick to more or less flex for the type of hunting and terrain I'll be in?
 
#9
Leaning towards not worry about the weight and focusing more on ankle support since I've had a lot of past issues with rolling ankles. A lot of reading on this site and online and I'm leaning towards pulling the trigger on the Crispi Idaho GTX.
 

Laelkhunter

Well-known member
#11
Also look at Crispi Guide, or Crispi Hunter. The Guide is the same boot, but about 2 inches shorter. SUPER comfortable, waterproof, and plenty of ankle support.
 
#12
Crispi Idaho GTX boots came in a week ago.

I think I made the right choice and had never even heard of them until this forum so I appreciate everyones input! Wore them around the house a couple days and decided to take the tags off. Great fit and they are very true to size. Great Ankle support and just all around comfortable! Only thing I can see doing is swapping out the insoles.
 

Laelkhunter

Well-known member
#13
Crispi Idaho GTX boots came in a week ago.

I think I made the right choice and had never even heard of them until this forum so I appreciate everyones input! Wore them around the house a couple days and decided to take the tags off. Great fit and they are very true to size. Great Ankle support and just all around comfortable! Only thing I can see doing is swapping out the insoles.
Get some Crispi waterproofing Cream to put on them before you expose them to the weather. I put two coats on mine and they stayed waterproof even after hunting all day in knee deep snow.
 

LongWayAround

Well-known member
#14
I'm on my second pair of Garmont Civettas and will keep using them until they fall apart. Stiff soles, wide enough for my Hobbit feet, fairly low arch, and about 8" tall.
 
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thinhorn_AK

Well-known member
#15
I’ve been on a pair of crispi birksdall SFs for a while now, great boot. They are stuff but not so stiff you can’t walk. If found them to be nearly perfect for me.
 

OFFHNTN

Well-known member
#16
Crispi Idaho GTX boots came in a week ago.

I think I made the right choice and had never even heard of them until this forum so I appreciate everyones input! Wore them around the house a couple days and decided to take the tags off. Great fit and they are very true to size. Great Ankle support and just all around comfortable! Only thing I can see doing is swapping out the insoles.
Great choice! Best of luck on your hunt!
I ended up putting some Lathrop and Sons insoles in my Crispi's.
 
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sodaksooner

Well-known member
#17
Rich, I'm in Tulsa. My brother and I both use the Salomon quest 4d as well. I have two seasons on mine and holding up well I saw you picked up the Crispi's. Let us know how you like them.
 
#18
I would try on as many boots as you can, and let your feet decide. Lots of quality boots on the market, fit is much more personal.

My preference is for a light hiker like the La sportiva Trango TRK or Mammut Trovat (the Mammut being a bit stiffer). I prefer to hike and backpack in trail runners in the summer to get my ankles strong.

I have worn out lots of pairs of stiffer boots (Lowa Tibets, Scarpa, etc) and find that I actually roll ankles less and have happier feet with a lighter, more flexible boot.

Your mileage may vary, but this is what works for me.
 

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