Sleeping Pad R-Value

Yukondog

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2012
Messages
320
Location
Parker, CO
At what temperature does the R-Value of a sleeping pad come into play?

I have a BA Insulated Air Core that is advertised at 4. The same size Exped SynMat UL 7 sleeping pad has a advertised R-Value of 3.1.

I was not really looking for a pad until I saw that the Exped has a advertised weight that is 15oz lighter (21.1oz vs 36oz) than my BA. Now that has captured my interest.

I currently have the BA Mystic Bag, but thinking of taking the leap and picking up the WM Badger. So, that is what will be riding the pad at night.

Thanks,

Matt
 

dotman

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Feb 24, 2012
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Not sure, currently i just use the z-lite but am thinking of adding one.
 

stephen b

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Feb 25, 2012
Messages
489
Location
Mckenzie Valley, Oregon
For even more of a weight savings- take a look at the POE (Pacific Outdoor Equipment) Peak Elite AC pad. It is advertised at 14 oz. but mine a 20x72 came in at about 12 oz.

I also have a BA ins AC and it is much heavier; and I was just as warm with the POE one. It uses zone areas that have higher R values where you need them most. I also some times carry a 3/4 Ridgerest cc pad with it and then at 22 oz. together I still come in less than my BAIAC pad. Then I have a cc pad for sitting/ glassing and a back up if I get a leak in the air pad. The 2 together really ^ the R value.

So far I am impressed with the POE pad and to top it off they are reasonably priced- which is nice.
 

Lawnboi

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Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
3,073
Location
North Central Wi
When the temps drop and I need more insulation under me I combine a Zlite and a prolite shorty. Comes in at 24 oz. Then like said before I can use the zlite as a seat. I have no idea on what the combination comes in at r value wise but it keeps me warm to the single digits, which is the coldest iv slept in.

Warm weather I just take the Zlite for its versatility
 

Curtis C

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
789
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
For me the Colorado ground is always cold enough to justify a pad for insulation purposes. I use a BA IAC during warmer months and then add a close cell pad during the colder months.

I think the synmat ul 7 will work fine for most nights during hunting season in Colorado. If you think you use it regularly in winter or colder environments I'd consider something with a higher r value like the downmats or just plan to add a closed cell pad to the ul7.

The weight savings from the BA to the synmat 7 is something I'll have to consider when the BA starts leaking.

Curtis
 

slim9300

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
1,350
Location
Olympia, WA
At what temperature does the R-Value of a sleeping pad come into play?

I have a BA Insulated Air Core that is advertised at 4. The same size Exped SynMat UL 7 sleeping pad has a advertised R-Value of 3.1.

I was not really looking for a pad until I saw that the Exped has a advertised weight that is 15oz lighter (21.1oz vs 36oz) than my BA. Now that has captured my interest.

I currently have the BA Mystic Bag, but thinking of taking the leap and picking up the WM Badger. So, that is what will be riding the pad at night.

Thanks,

Matt
The Exped SynMat UL7 is a great pad. I have slept in the low 20s in my 20 degree Marmot Helium bag and been toasty warm with a layer of clothing on. You will love this pad for hunting during the month of September. And the good news is that the medium (the largest size) actually weighs in at 16 ounces with the stuff sack and 17 ounces if you add the patch kit (which I would highly suggest just in case). It also packs down to smaller than a nalgene bottle.
 

luke moffat

Administrator
Joined
Feb 24, 2012
Messages
2,493
I have been in the low 20s with my 25 degree western mountaineering bag an 9 oz Neo air short in only my skivvies and was more than comfortable.
 
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