Arrows for Rocky Mtn. Big Horn Sheep

Above Timber

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Joined
Apr 16, 2012
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175
Location
Colorado Springs
I drew a sheep tag and need some recommendations on arrows. I currently shoot Gold Tip Velocity XT but feel they might be too light for sheep as they only weigh in at 350 grains. I really like Gold Tip arrows but am open to suggestions. What recommendations do people have as far over all weight of the arrow, broad head weight, 3 or 4 vane fletch (if this matters)…??? My hunt is not until the last two weeks of October but I want to make this decision so I can start shooting these arrows. I shoot a Heli-m 28” draw at 70# if this makes a difference. Thanks for the help.
 

cmeier117

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Feb 24, 2012
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1,552
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Salem, OR
Never hunted Big horn sheep, but with your bow, poundage, and DL You could easily get your arrow weight up around 420 grains shooting the 300 spine GT Velocity's. Obviously you could step up to the Kinetic xt's if you wanted. But I would get your arrow weight up around 400-430 grains. Just me though.
 

Darin Cooper

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Feb 25, 2012
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881
Location
Idaho
Sheep are fairly thin-skinned animals so you can typically get away with a deer type setup. I would recommend some of the smaller diameter shafts with smaller vanes and either a good mechanical broadhead (NAP Spitfire, Rage, G5 rear deploy, or the Ulmer head) or a smallish fixed blade head. Shots in sheep country tend to be longer, and it's a rare day when the wind isn't blowing at least a little bit. I'm an Easton fan and I like the Axis arrows and the new Injexion shafts are sweet. You really need to practice shooting on some steep terrain and be sure to have an angle compensating rangefinder that you have tested and can trust beacuse the yardage cuts in sheep country can be extreme.

Coop
 

fire arrow

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Joined
Apr 10, 2012
Messages
569
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Rancho Cordova, CA
This is just my 2.5 cents worth. I think a lot of people these days get way to wrapped up in what there arrow weigh, how fast there bow is, ect ect. If you choose a good quality arrow, Axis or FMJ, or what ever your budget will allow, all that is needed is to make sure the spine is correct for your bow, and that you put as much time into tunning, and being able to shooot your BH'ed arrow in all conditions, so that you know your effective range. The axis is a good arrow. It is a very tough arrow, and will be perfect to shoot, or it will be broken. No guess work. The FMJ's are a little bit straighter, and hit a lot harder, but they can be bent, and cost more. Both are great arrows.

More importantly, make sure your bow is timed correct, and BH tune your bow as best you can. Make sure you practice your hard uphill, and downhill shots. Shoot in to a croos wind. Try to get good at estimating yardage on flat grond, and at angles, (this is kind of a lost art) you may not have time to range your sheep if a quick shot presents it's self. Once you get your bow and BH set up shooting good, throw your pack on with weight in it, do a 50-100 yd run, 25 push ups, and try to get one good shot off with a BH. This will simulate the way you will probably feel when you get your shot, and we all hope that you do. Once you can do this, back that target up more. Chances are your first shot, might be your only shot. Your heart will be pumpin, legs and back will not be happy with you because of all the hiking you are going to be doing. Like I said this is JMO. Hope it helps, and good luck. If you get a chance to go scouting, post those bad boys. A lot of us will be living vicariously through you.
 

Mike P

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
62
I would say you are fine with what you are using now...sheep are not very wide in the chest and the biggest factor in sheep hunting as far as bows/arrows is shooting accurately IMHO

Lots of guys think you need to shoot a mile to kill a sheep (it doesn't hurt to be able to extend your range) but likely the biggest reason for missed shots is the angle of the shots...Lots of up/down and side hill shots. Have seen guys miss chip shots on sheep because of not understanding how to shoot the angle and also not levelling their bow...I missed an EASY shot at a goat years ago because I didn't know enough about shooting angles. If I could take that arrow back knowing what i know now i could hit that sucker in the eyeball if i had to...lol

Advise i would give you is this:

-Keep your shooting gear simple (tough, easy to fix, and shoot ALOT with it up/down/sidehill and in the wind)
-Get is shape
-Glass, Glass, Glass (park you butt down and glass...sheep will appear from know-where at all times of the day)

and the number 1 tip
-Go to the mountain with a never say die attitude and stick to it...99.999% of guys who don't get sheep do so because of not being mentally prepared IMHO. you can have all the Sitka/KUIU, Swarski/Leupold, Hoyt/Bowtech gear in the world but you mind is what will get a sheep on the ground!!!
 

Tdiesel

Senior Member
Joined
May 16, 2012
Messages
123
Location
Colorado
Although I've never killed a sheep with my bow I have killed two with a rifle and I deer hunt in the same area with my bow. Darin pretty well summed it up relatively easy to kill a sheep, but making sure you connect is the key. Personally I am starting to use a four fletch cause it seems to stabilize alot better in the wind. only thing I can think to add that hasn't been said.
you can have all the Sitka/KUIU, Swarski/Leupold, Hoyt/Bowtech gear in the world but your mind is what will get a sheep on the ground!!!
I like this quote. My first sheep was shot at a whopping 18 yrds with a .243 so not all shots have to be long range but be prepared for longer and winds.
 

Aerohead300

Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
72
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
I have had two sheep tags so far. My first tag I was running a PSE Carbon Force 300, weighing about 370 grains. The one thing you can count on, is that wind will blow in sheep country! My one shot opportunity with that first tag, I watched the wind blow my arrow a good two feet over that ram. My second tag was just last year, and I was using Easton Axis 340's weighing 420 grains with 2.1 fusion vanes tipped with a Rocket Sidedwinder 3. This was a much better set-up. If you like the Gold Tip's, I would say a Kinetic 400 would be a great arrow.
 
OP
Above Timber

Above Timber

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2012
Messages
175
Location
Colorado Springs
I went with the GT Kinetic 400's with 100 gr. slick trick magnums, and blazers. Each arrow comes in at 405 grs. I shot last weekend in the great weather (HA HA) we had here in the Front Range area and the wind did not do much to them. I had a harder time holding my bow steady in the wind. Thanks for all the advice on the topic.

Jeff
 

Maxhunter

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
302
Location
Wyoming
Sheep are fairly thin-skinned animals so you can typically get away with a deer type setup. I would recommend some of the smaller diameter shafts with smaller vanes and either a good mechanical broadhead (NAP Spitfire, Rage, G5 rear deploy, or the Ulmer head) or a smallish fixed blade head. Shots in sheep country tend to be longer, and it's a rare day when the wind isn't blowing at least a little bit. I'm an Easton fan and I like the Axis arrows and the new Injexion shafts are sweet. You really need to practice shooting on some steep terrain and be sure to have an angle compensating rangefinder that you have tested and can trust beacuse the yardage cuts in sheep country can be extreme.

Coop

Some very good advice!
 
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