Draw weight increase

Rheron

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Mar 27, 2017
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Hey friends looking to step up in draw weight for my ilf recurve. Had 30# limbs. Looking to go heavier after having shot them for a few months. My draw length is roughly 31.5". What size weight increase is recommended? Get the 40# limbs or is a 35# limb a better idea? I'm able to shoot accurately and hold with good form at full draw for 15sec plus. if anyone is interested I have the wood/glass TT blackmax 2.0 long 30# listed in the classified section.
Ryan
 

dlee56

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With the ease of ILF I would just get the weight you are wanting to shoot in the end. I stepped up from 35s to 50s this summer simply by slowly rotating in my 50lb limbs. Each session I would first shoot my 35s for a few rounds get warm and establish a good shot, then shoot my 50s for only 4-5 shots maintaining good form then switch back to my 35s for the rest of the day.

Shooting almost daily I slowly shot my 50s more and more (5 shots 1 week, 10 shots the next week, etc) until after a month or so I don't have to start or finish with my 35s anymore. I could just shoot the 50s without compromising form. Hope that makes sense.
 
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Rheron

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Mar 27, 2017
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Appreciate that. Ended up buying the 40# limbs. I figure with my draw length and bow setup I'll land in that 47# range. Looking to stay ethical for muley/elk but also stay as light as I can to keep my form dialed.
 

Where's Bruce?

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I started at 35, went to 45 pretty quickly and stayed there over a year...and am now at 57. Hit a real sweet spot there.
 

MCR

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With your long draw you will be able to shoot anything in North America with that 47# bow and the right arrow.
 
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Rheron

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Mar 27, 2017
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I had purchased a 45# recurve years ago that was way too heavy and too short for me. The classic compound to trad mistake many of us have made. I sold that bow soon after. When deciding to attempt a trad bow build again I was adamant about low draw weight and lessons. Lessons have provided fruitful. Was worried about draw weight increase hence the post. Thank you all for replying.
 

sneaky

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Those light limbs are like little kids and the elderly. They'll tell the truth every time when it comes to form.

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Sapcut

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Wow. Just because a certain bow weight is too heavy for you and you feel you can't draw it now, doesn't mean don't draw the bow. The ONLY way to increase your draw weight and shoot the heavier weight just like you did the lighter weight....is to draw the bow. The draw or shot doesn't have to be perfect, so what. Just draw it over and over and over again. How else are you going to strengthen bow pulling muscles without pulling the bow? Do you or anyone you know go in a weight room and lift the lightest weights available so as to avoid any muscle resistance....but still expect any results?

You are not supposed to have perfect form when pulling a heavier bow than you are used to. But you can... if you just draw the bow over and over. You will be amazed at how quick you can efficiently and accurately shoot the heavier bow that everyone else will tell you not to use.

Keep those lighter limbs for form work while you get accustomed to the new weight increase.
If you need lighter limbs for form then what good does that do for form with the heavier limbs? Why not just draw the heavier bow and develop good form with them? What is the point of having heavier limbs if you are only worried about form with the lighter limbs? The only way to get good form with the heavier limbs is to draw and shoot the bow, over an over and over.
 

sneaky

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Wow. Just because a certain bow weight is too heavy for you and you feel you can't draw it now, doesn't mean don't draw the bow. The ONLY way to increase your draw weight and shoot the heavier weight just like you did the lighter weight....is to draw the bow. The draw or shot doesn't have to be perfect, so what. Just draw it over and over and over again. How else are you going to strengthen bow pulling muscles without pulling the bow? Do you or anyone you know go in a weight room and lift the lightest weights available so as to avoid any muscle resistance....but still expect any results?

You are not supposed to have perfect form when pulling a heavier bow than you are used to. But you can... if you just draw the bow over and over. You will be amazed at how quick you can efficiently and accurately shoot the heavier bow that everyone else will tell you not to use.


If you need lighter limbs for form then what good does that do for form with the heavier limbs? Why not just draw the heavier bow and develop good form with them? What is the point of having heavier limbs if you are only worried about form with the lighter limbs? The only way to get good form with the heavier limbs is to draw and shoot the bow, over an over and over.
This is the exact type of advice that leads to people being overbowed. Just stop. No one's telling him not to shoot a heavier set of limbs. But, this will most likely shock YOU, heavier weight limbs HIDE a lot of form flaws. String leaves your fingers quicker so it hides release issues. A lighter set of limbs will expose poor form and any weakness in your shot execution. Go be as big of a he-man as you want to be, no one will stop you. We are giving him the formula for building a solid foundation for success. I had a Silvertip that was over 70# at my draw length. Incredibly accurate with that bow for about a dozen shots, then it just wasn't fun to shoot anymore. I shoot to enjoy it, not to impress anyone. I shoot anywhere from 48-55# now at 31" and have a great time and feel better. Could I shoot heavier? Sure. Have zero desire or NEED to. I can kill anything on this continent with my current setups.

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sneaky

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Also, just pulling a heavier bow over and over doesn't build form, it builds strength. Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect. Just pulling heavy weight to get stronger means just that, you got stronger.

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Sapcut

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This is the exact type of advice that leads to people being overbowed.
Notice I didn't suggest buying a heavier bow than he can shoot and immediately enter a 3D tournament or try to kill and animal with it. I suggest draw the bow over and over to gain strength first, then it can be handled proficiently. If that is not how its done, tell us all how a grown man can proficiently gain the ability to proficiently shoot a 70# bow? Is every man stuck with a 33.5# bow because it is super easy to draw the first time its picked up? Is that the advice you are suggesting?

Go be as big of a he-man as you want to be, no one will stop you
Rather childish and sounds rather defensive.

String leaves your fingers quicker so it hides release issues.
This may shock you but a string leaving your fingers quicker can certainly eliminate release issues.

We are giving him the formula for building a solid foundation for success.
I agree and your help is appreciated. I am also suggesting assistance if he or any other bow holder wants to ever be able to draw and proficiently shoot a trad bow heavier than a zero resistance weight. Or be stuck with a light bow their entire adulthood.....which is certainly a preference.

I had a Silvertip that was over 70# at my draw length. Incredibly accurate with that bow for about a dozen shots, then it just wasn't fun to shoot anymore.
Perhaps due to the string leaving your fingers quicker. Wasn't fun to shoot is personal issue because it was probably physically too heavy for you to shoot all day. No problem there but are you pushing your personal preferences and abilities on the guy your trying to help and suggesting to me to "Just stop". ?


I shoot to enjoy it, not to impress anyone. I shoot anywhere from 48-55# now at 31" and have a great time and feel better. Could I shoot heavier?
Awesome

Sure. Have zero desire or NEED to. I can kill anything on this continent with my current setups.
Probably so if you make a perfect shot without hitting big bones. No need to shoot over 48-55#s ? Did you ever shoot a compound bow? What poundage was it?

Also, just pulling a heavier bow over and over doesn't build form, it builds strength. Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect. Just pulling heavy weight to get stronger means just that, you got stronger.
To build form with a "heavier" bow, strength has to be increased beforehand, obviously. Then proper form can be gained, obviously. It is very simple IF a grown man doesn't mind muscle reistance and gaining muscle strength....IF he chooses to shoot a heavier bow.

Again, if the above is not correct, you tell us in an unbiased, non preferenced manner how a grown man can ever attain the ability to proficiently shoot a heavier bow. Just curious.
 
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