I'm Done with backtension

vcb

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Dont get me wrong there are some great actions to be taken from the backtension method: Pulling into the wall to stabilize bow, "hooking" finger over trigger, pre-loading the trigger before engaging back. I understand the "dymamic" concept but I think it's just not right for me..Why? IM NOT OK WITH THE DRIFT OF MY PIN. Backtension works great for me when its dead calm, shooting indoor targets etc... and my pin drift is very minimal. Then when the bow goes off it should be a good shot. However bowhunting out here in CO wind is a big factor more so with mule deer and goats. I just feel like I can be a more accurate shot using a controlled squeeze when the sight picture looks good. I still use all of the actions mentioned in the beginning but I conciously let the arrow go. Anybody else feel the same way?
 

Curtis C

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Anybody else feel the same way?

Yes Sir! If I were a target shooter I'd be more likely to focus on backtension. All of my shooting is done with my hunting rig and with hunting situation in mind. I find it hard to focus on backtension when I am leaning, hunched, stretched or other odd positions needed to get an arrow past an obstacle and into the chest cavity.

C
 

pronghorn

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Since I beat target panic in 2006 I have not punched my release once. Like it or not back tension is the key to accurate and more importantly consistent shooting. While not every shot will be executed with perfect back tension, it is the foundation of a consistent shot. It aids in steadying the pin and helps to relax the muscles that should not be involved in the shot. Some level of tension is required just to keep the bow at full draw. You might as well use your back muscles to do that work, they are stronger, more stable and closer to your spine/core.
 

Josh Wright

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Maybe, I am missing something here, but I have bow hunted for 12 years and I have no idea what the backtension method is.
 

trevore

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I don't hunt with a back tension style release. But I will shoot dots with it. It really helps me with the control. If I stick with it all spring/summer, I don't have much pin drift unless there is some wind. I can put the the pin there and hold it.
 
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vcb

vcb

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Josh, Backtension is a style of triggering your release via large muscles in your back rather than conciously using your index finger, thumb etc.. to release the arrow on your command. The whole idea of BT is a suprise release.

Trevore, see my pin drift sucks. I am talking 40 yds plus. With a little wind my pin at 50 is all over the face. I like using the ideas of BT to get my release pre loaded and then when the picture looks good...I let it go.
 

Aerohead300

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@ trevore, you don't need a "back tension" release to shoot back tension. You can activate a trigger style release by using back tension. I shoot a TON of tournaments through-out the year. Indoor spots, outdoor spots, field, and 3D. I use a hinge style release for most of my tournaments, but when I go to my trigger, I shoot it in a similar way. Now I realize that in a hunting situation you can't always get the perfect back tension shot off, but if you practice with good back tension, your hunting shots will be better. Be sure to look up Evan's blog on trigger control on the home page.
 

bowhnter7

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Dont get me wrong there are some great actions to be taken from the backtension method: Pulling into the wall to stabilize bow, "hooking" finger over trigger, pre-loading the trigger before engaging back. I understand the "dymamic" concept but I think it's just not right for me..Why? IM NOT OK WITH THE DRIFT OF MY PIN. Backtension works great for me when its dead calm, shooting indoor targets etc... and my pin drift is very minimal. Then when the bow goes off it should be a good shot. However bowhunting out here in CO wind is a big factor more so with mule deer and goats. I just feel like I can be a more accurate shot using a controlled squeeze when the sight picture looks good. I still use all of the actions mentioned in the beginning but I conciously let the arrow go. Anybody else feel the same way?
Sorry but NO.

I'd NEVER go back to "commanding" the release. NEVER. Or even a controlled squeeze, cause it will rarely stay that way.
Now for bowhunting if I need to speed up a shot to accomidate the situation I can and will but it's not a part of my daily shooting process at all.

You do what you feel is more accurate for you vcb.....that's what's important to you and the animals your trying to harvest.
 
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Sorry but NO.

I'd NEVER go back to "commanding" the release. NEVER. Or even a controlled squeeze, cause it will rarely stay that way.
Now for bowhunting if I need to speed up a shot to accomidate the situation I can and will but it's not a part of my daily shooting process at all.

You do what you feel is more accurate for you vcb.....that's what's important to you and the animals your trying to harvest.
Couldn't have said it better myself. I love shooting with backtension and the accuracy I gain from it.
 

Lawnboi

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its all in your head!!!! backtension is mostly mental, and i would never want to go back to punching the trigger. my pin floats regardless, and when shooting backtension my pins acutally seem to slow down
 

evan williams

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Back Tension, like said above, is going to give you a much better foundation ESPECIALLY when it comes to shooting in the wind!!! The equalization of forces in opposite directions combined with the proper stabilizer set-up with your bow will hold better than a weak backed shot, or in other words a PUNCHED shot. If you are noticing your pin "floating" then, IN MY OPINION, or focus is in the wrong place. Most guys who physically take and COMMAND a shot are focusing on the pin and therefore see more movement. When you focus on the specific desired impact of your arrow and execute a good shot you don't see your pin "floating" because that isn't your focus. You are then simply executing a shot and your sub-conscience takes over aiming. The human brain can only focus on one task at a time so if you are focused on your pin you aren't focused on aiming or your trigger or your shot execution. Back Tension takes a LOT of practice and BLIND BALE SHOOTING with your eyes closed up close to "FEEL" the shot and teach your muscles ( building muscle memory, ie. allowing your sub-conscience to shoot the arrow ) so that you can focus on the target and let your body do the rest. One of the biggest keys to back tension...NEVER STOP PULLING!!!

Aerohead300 and bowhntr7 are great guys to go to for advice on the subject as well as pronghorn. I know all 3 of these guys and I HATE shooting against them but they are making me a better shooter :) !!!!
 

bowhnter7

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I'll add a few comments:

Like Evan stated Blind Bail is great for getting the feel for everything but it's not the total solution. BB is great for learning a "skill" and transferring that particular "skill" to your sub-concious mind but.....

The next step and the actual problem most people have is when they aim.

They see their pin or dot float too much and it hi jacks their execution and they go right back to commanding the release.

So how do you aim trust the float and execute your shot with the "skill" you learned on the BB?

You aim at short yardage. Put a target up at 10 yards and practice your "skill" while aiming. Your float will be really small, you will be able to execute a great shot and you will be feeding both "float" and great execution to your brain.

Now I'm not just talking about doing this a few times. It takes lots of time if your serious about making a big positive change to your shot. At first you have to commit to making good shots and not worry so much about where the arrow hits. Reward yourself for making that good shot and do it again. If your drawlength and many other factors are correct your float will minimize over time.

Most change the way they shoot under pressure. One of the best things I ever did was get involved in competitive archery many years ago. Most guys hate competitive indoor archery and really moan about it but to be honest its all mental and actually really good for you. The amount of pressure that comes from standing on the line with some of the states best archers and going toe to toe knowing you can't miss many X's or 10's can get very nerve racking. Or competing outdoors on the 3D or field range making "that" shot when it counts in the elements at distance, up hill, down hill etc. It's a perfect setting to get actual practice shooting "when it counts".

That way when that bull, buck or what ever it is gives you the shot you will have just a bit more confidence in making that shot.
 
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vcb

vcb

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All good advice. I like your way of thinking about just the target Evan and not even thinking about the pin...(I will try it!) ..My groups on a 3d buck at 70yds is decent. As long as I can keep them all on the lungs...that's good for me. I dont think I will ever consistantly group a 4" group past 70. That 3d buck makes a elk look like the side of a barn. HOWEVER, I did recently shoot with a guy that had TARGET PANIC!!!! I have been shooting bows for 30yrs. and have heard about target panic but never really saw it. All I have to say is WOW. It was like he totally lost control of his coordination and half the time he would release his fingers instead of triggering the release! Man....I can see how that is a long term problem that takes LOTS of coaching and practice to work through.....scary!!
 

Darin Cooper

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Rock solid advice guys - I just wrote a similarly themed article for Eastmans' Bowhunting. You guys nailed it! Back Tension requires serious dedication, but it's worth it X 10.

Coop
 
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vcb

vcb

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Question for you backtension guys. I can shoot both ways right now...command or back tension. When you guys are shooting BT and the sight picture is off due to (wind or just a wide drift) do you hold your pull...then continue your pull once you come back on target? Or do you guys just pull all the way through from the first moment and accept when the arrow releases? I think Ulmer talked about this a little and he said he definitely increases tension when the sight picture looks good....
 

evan williams

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NEVER STOP PULLING!!! I think with a lot of practice you can tell when the wind will pick up and all but I never stop pulling. Its too hard to start and stop and start and stop. I focus on the spot I want to hit and burn a hole in it with my eyes.
 

pronghorn

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I read a discussion that a few guys had with Jesse Broadwater on AT this week. He said that he puts additional tension on the wall when shooting in the wind.
 
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