Kimber durability

Sled

Senior Member
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Jun 11, 2018
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281
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Utah
Why is it that every used Kimber I've seen looks like it's been a boat paddle on class 4 rapids? I get that they are light and meant to be used but other manufacturers that see similar conditions seem to fair better. If they didn't dip the stock it might change the overall appearance more than most things. If they cerakoted instead of trying their hand at a poor excuse for stainless it might help as well. It's a shame because for the price it has a lot going for it. Good trigger, threaded, reasonable accuracy and as light as some titanium customs. So what gives? Why do they cheap out on the exterior?
 

BeaverHunter

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Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Messages
520
Not really sure what you’re seeing that I’m not. I owned a Kimber Montana for a number of years and it’s looked like new except for one small scratch on the stock which would have scratched just about any gun. The stainless on it was like new when I sold it.
 

thinhorn_AK

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Jul 2, 2016
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Alaska
I think that rough texture of the stock sort of collects stuff it scratches on. Mine looks pretty scratched up but it’s not damaged or anything.
 

N2TRKYS

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Apr 17, 2016
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1,974
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Alabama
I've noticed that with a lot of used rifles being sold. The term "handling marks" means vastly different things to me than everyone else, apparently. I use my weapons, but don't scratch them up.
 

Ghostman

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Jun 12, 2018
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Glendive,MT
I had one for awhile and remember the stock picking up a lot of dirt in texture, so maybe the stocks just are not cleaned properly.
 

Buzby

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Jul 3, 2019
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Kankakee, IL
“Poor excuse for stainless”? I’m not sure how their stainless is any worse than any other manufactures. Sounds like you may have some bias against them. Considering the cost of a carbon fiber stocks, kimbers are pretty low cost. I don’t expect to find a polished finish on one. I’d also wager anyone willing to pay for the extra cost of a lightweight/carbon fiber stocked rifle, plans on carrying that rifle a lot in the field. That would explain a lot of handling marks.
 

Bull_n_heat

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Jun 15, 2017
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36
Location
Wyoming
Not really sure what you’re seeing that I’m not. I owned a Kimber Montana for a number of years and it’s looked like new except for one small scratch on the stock which would have scratched just about any gun. The stainless on it was like new when I sold it.
What he said.... I've had mine for several years (and got it used), without anything amiss about it on the exterior. That includes several substantial falls and dings that have yet to show.
 
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Sled

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2018
Messages
281
Location
Utah
well, that's encouraging to hear. i've only seen rough shape kimbers in my area with rust spots and missing camo print. i should be looking for an eastern rifle that only sees the deer stand. since i plan on hunting with mine it'll get either cerakoted or duracoat when it starts to show any wear. i do plan to give it a chance first though.
 

Kimber7man

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Joined
Jun 18, 2019
Messages
179
Location
Indiana
If I recall correctly, there were reports that Kimber would bead blast the barreled actions and traces of oxide or some other metal would end up causing rust spots on the barrels. Think that was over on the Campfire? I’ll see if I can dig it up...
 
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