New Boot Heel Pain

Benjblt

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So I just ordered a bunch of boots from a specific brand in different sizes and styles. After anguishing over which one to select i picked one (they were all in the $300 range). Thois specific pair felt pretty comfortable around the house, albeit a little snug. Ive had the experience of boots getting much looser after some use. The first day I wore them i hikes up a steep hill for about .6 miles. It immediatly began to wear my heal raw.

What do you all think? Could this be because I picked too small a size? Do i need to break them in more? The boot is almost completely all leather semi-mountaineering boot. Usually I hear that this due to too large a size.

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idig4au

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You might have a problem with heel volume in your boot. Do the boots feel like they are cupping your heel and achillies tendon area of your foot or do they not feel as tight in this area? I've found this is a critical area for my feet when selecting stiffer mountaineering type boots. If my heel doesn't feel like its in a pocket, I will not even consider the boot as I will have heel problems otherwise. When the fit of the boot is dialed in, you should have minimal issues right out of the box. Also want the boots to be about 1/2 size larger then your regular shoes. If you tap the toe of your boot on the floor behind you, your toes shouldn't be touching the top of the boot.

In your case, might want to change your insoles and see if you can get one with will help take up volume in your heel. You can also try different lacing techniques that help lock the heel in place. There are some videos on youtube that demonstrate this. If those tricks don't help, then probably need to consider another boot that is more narrow in the heel.

You also might want to consider using some leukotape on your heel as a preventative measure before each hike.
 
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Benjblt

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You might have a problem with heel volume in your boot. Do the boots feel like they are cupping your heel and achillies tendon area of your foot or do they not feel as tight in this area? I've found this is a critical area for my feet when selecting stiffer mountaineering type boots. If my heel doesn't feel like its in a pocket, I will not even consider the boot as I will have heel problems otherwise. When the fit of the boot is dialed in, you should have minimal issues right out of the box. Also want the boots to be about 1/2 size larger then your regular shoes. If you tap the toe of your boot on the floor behind you, your toes shouldn't be touching the top of the boot.

In your case, might want to change your insoles and see if you can get one with will help take up volume in your heel. You can also try different lacing techniques that help lock the heel in place. There are some videos on youtube that demonstrate this. If those tricks don't help, then probably need to consider another boot that is more narrow in the heel.

You also might want to consider using some leukotape on your heel as a preventative measure before each hike.

I'm usually an 8.5 in normal shoes but boots are often larger on me. I went with an 8 on this one. The problem is my heal feels good in the boot until I go up a steep heel and its hard to recreate that at home or in a store. You need several yards of steep terrain. My heel does fit in the heel pocket and when I lock it in with the laces it feels pretty well locked in. My toes do come close to the end but aren't touching if I lock it in with laces. The boot may be a little too small but the larger size seems like I will have a bit of heel slippage.
 

idig4au

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If you are confident in the size, then perhaps try some different insoles and a modified lacing technique to see if you can salvage the boots and make them work for you. Super feet orange or green might be a good place to start depending on your foot volume. Others have had luck with Lathrop on Sons Synergy insoles. There are many options out there. REI usually has a good selection of insoles and might have a test rock feature that allows you to test your boots in store.

Could also look at your changing up your socks. Some guys swear using sock liners, but I never had much lock with those. Everyone's feet are different.
 
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Benjblt

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If you are confident in the size, then perhaps try some different insoles and a modified lacing technique to see if you can salvage the boots and make them work for you. Super feet orange or green might be a good place to start depending on your foot volume. Others have had luck with Lathrop on Sons Synergy insoles. There are many options out there. REI usually has a good selection of insoles and might have a test rock feature that allows you to test your boots in store.

Could also look at your changing up your socks. Some guys swear using sock liners, but I never had much lock with those. Everyone's feet are different.

Thanks for the help. I actually have the Superfeet Orange that I'm using in some Lowa fast hikers. I might just switch them out. I just got back from testing the boots on another steep hill. The boots are Crispi Dakota's that I got from Black Ovis. I called them and, I believe it was John, helped me out a little. I tried lacing them differently and some different socks. It seem to help lock my hill in a little better and honestly it felt much better. I think It was a combination of breaking them in, socks,and lacing. My toes do touch a little on the down hill but I don't think it is enough to cause problems.

I didn't mention the boot make and style because I didn't want it to sound like I was bagging on Crispi. So much of boots fitting and being comfortable relies on all of these different factors. I think the boot will work great for me now that i'v figured out how to lace them a little better but time will tell with a little more use. If I have any more problems I guess I can always try to sell them.
 

wind gypsy

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I used to think I wanted a boot to feel like it "locked" my heel in the heel pocket. What I found is that boots that felt like they would keep my heel locked down were the ones that tore it up the worse via more intense pressure in it. Most notably I saw this in scarpa charmoz which have significant structure around the heel to keep in in place.
 

idig4au

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Funny, I tried on several scarpa boot models and my feet felt like they were in muck boots. Way too wide for me. Getting a boot to fit correctly is a personal thing as all feet are not treated equal.
 

couesbitten

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My toes do touch a little on the down hill but I don't think it is enough to cause problems.

My opinion based on personal experience, is that this will be an issue, especially with a pack of any significant weight (40+ lbs). I'd rather have a boot that was 1/2 size to big, than 1/2 size to small.
 

sneaky

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My opinion based on personal experience, is that this will be an issue, especially with a pack of any significant weight (40+ lbs). I'd rather have a boot that was 1/2 size to big, than 1/2 size to small.

I learned this the hard way. OP, I would seriously consider getting an 8.5 in that boot if I were you. Lots of heel problems come from too small of a boot, pressing your heel too hard into the heel cup and causing friction. My problems went away once I went up a size in my boots.
 

fleanoodle

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Feb 17, 2016
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I had the exact same problem with a pair of Kenetreks. Felt great in the store and breaking in on flat land. Started up a steep hill and my heels were shredded in half a mile. Tried countless sock, insole, and lacing techniques. Nothing would work. Had to go back to my Salomon Quests for the rest of the year. Still looking for a more durable boot to replace the Salomons. Crispis Idahos were better but still had the same issue. Thinking about trying some Zamberlans or Kuiu's R-Evolution.

Side note: Cheap pair of UI Kenetrek Mountain Extremes are up for grabs.
 
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Benjblt

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I had the exact same problem with a pair of Kenetreks. Felt great in the store and breaking in on flat land. Started up a steep hill and my heels were shredded in half a mile. Tried countless sock, insole, and lacing techniques. Nothing would work. Had to go back to my Salomon Quests for the rest of the year. Still looking for a more durable boot to replace the Salomons. Crispis Idahos were better but still had the same issue. Thinking about trying some Zamberlans or Kuiu's R-Evolution.

Side note: Cheap pair of UI Kenetrek Mountain Extremes are up for grabs.

What size?
 

Jason Snyder

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My opinion based on personal experience, is that this will be an issue, especially with a pack of any significant weight (40+ lbs). I'd rather have a boot that was 1/2 size to big, than 1/2 size to small.

I agree, this has black toenails and sore feet written all over it.

If they touch now, there is no way they are big enough. Wait until your feet are swollen and hot from a long day at altitude, and you have to drop 2000 feet, then that toe touching will be a BIG issue.
 
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