Nunatak alpinist 18* vs FF Raven vs WM Badger

Millwood21

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Feb 14, 2020
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NE Georgia
I’m planning a diy September elk hunt in Colorado and I was looking into sleeping bags. Or sleep systems and can’t seem to find much comparison between WM to a Nunatak bag. I’m also considering a quilt. Torn between a bag and a quilt. I see lots of people are using quilts these days. Ive never had a nice bag. And I’ve never seen a quilt in action beside videos. My question running this in September and possibly later in the season in years to come which way would you consider going. The quilt will be a good amount less money but will it do the job the bags will do when temps drop to freezing or below. Is the Nunatak a good buy? Or spend the same amount on a badger. Or ditch the bag idea and run a 0-10* quilt. I do like to move around a little and the mummy style has me thinking I may not like it. I’m 6’0 175. If it matters. I will be using an xtherm Max pad. Not sure on shelter or anything else yet.
 

Eldoradotim

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Jul 27, 2020
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32
I’ve had (and still have 1) mummy bags, had a Nemo Disco (Roomy bag, not mummy) and returned it to REI as it was still too hot in mild weather and heavy/bulky.

I decided to try a quilt as I was just too curious and won’t really know until I try for myself. I think you‘re in the same boat, you can read on here all you want but won’t really know what works best for YOU until you try different options.

I went with an El Coyote quilt after finding them in this forum. It just came the other day so no experience yet but it seems very nice. 25 oz, and a long/wide 20 degree rating. I sleep warm and am hoping it works for me down well below freezing. Side sleeper/toss & turner and hoping for a lot more comfort than a mummy and more versatile in different temperatures (can open up into a blanket).

Hope it helps a little, but I think you just gotta try different options until you find what you prefer.
 
OP
Millwood21

Millwood21

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2020
Messages
26
Location
NE Georgia
I’ve had (and still have 1) mummy bags, had a Nemo Disco (Roomy bag, not mummy) and returned it to REI as it was still too hot in mild weather and heavy/bulky.

I decided to try a quilt as I was just too curious and won’t really know until I try for myself. I think you‘re in the same boat, you can read on here all you want but won’t really know what works best for YOU until you try different options.

I went with an El Coyote quilt after finding them in this forum. It just came the other day so no experience yet but it seems very nice. 25 oz, and a long/wide 20 degree rating. I sleep warm and am hoping it works for me down well below freezing. Side sleeper/toss & turner and hoping for a lot more comfort than a mummy and more versatile in different temperatures (can open up into a blanket).

Hope it helps a little, but I think you just gotta try different options until you find what you prefer.
I looked at quilts for about a week. Just not sure about it. I want to like the idea. I was almost going to order one with a zippered foot box but seen a lot of people say they are bad about drafts. Also saying get a sewn foot box. If I did that I feel like I may as well get a bag? I’m really torn at this point!!
 

twall13

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Jan 21, 2015
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Utah
I personally like quilts, but I say that coming from a hammock background where I think quilts really excel as an underquilt pretty much eliminates the draft issues and it's much easier to get into a quilt vs. a mummy bag in a hammock. I've still used quilts occasionally on the ground and like them but they aren't for everyone. I never use them with straps, I just tuck the quilt under my body so it's a more snug fit than if it's strapped to the pad. You still get more freedom of movement than a mummy bag, but yes, you can get drafts when you move around. After some time using them I almost unconsciously tuck edges in when I move around and don't really have an issue with that but a wide quilt really helps with this as well.

Quilts can save weight and provide a less claustrophobic feel but if you know you don't have a problem sleeping in a mummy bag it's a safe bet to go with one of the high end bags you've mentioned. I'm a fan of Nunatak but I'll admit I haven't tried any of these high end mummy bags as I stick to quilts. With the brands you are talking about I don't think you can make a bad purchase, they are all going to be top quality products.

If you are really itching to try the quilt out or want to save those extra few ounces it's really not going to be a bad purchase either. If it doesn't work for you it can be sold on here for a small loss. Consider that loss the cost to figure out what works best for you and move on. If you decide to go the route of a quilt purchase, I think it's pretty tough to beat Loco Libre for quality, though there are several other great brands as well.
 
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Millwood21

Millwood21

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2020
Messages
26
Location
NE Georgia
I personally like quilts, but I say that coming from a hammock background where I think quilts really excel as an underquilt pretty much eliminates the draft issues and it's much easier to get into a quilt vs. a mummy bag in a hammock. I've still used quilts occasionally on the ground and like them but they aren't for everyone. I never use them with straps, I just tuck the quilt under my body so it's a more snug fit than if it's strapped to the pad. You still get more freedom of movement than a mummy bag, but yes, you can get drafts when you move around. After some time using them I almost unconsciously tuck edges in when I move around and don't really have an issue with that but a wide quilt really helps with this as well.

Quilts can save weight and provide a less claustrophobic feel but if you know you don't have a problem sleeping in a mummy bag it's a safe bet to go with one of the high end bags you've mentioned. I'm a fan of Nunatak but I'll admit I haven't tried any of these high end mummy bags as I stick to quilts. With the brands you are talking about I don't think you can make a bad purchase, they are all going to be top quality products.

If you are really itching to try the quilt out or want to save those extra few ounces it's really not going to be a bad purchase either. If it doesn't work for you it can be sold on here for a small loss. Consider that loss the cost to figure out what works best for you and move on. If you decide to go the route of a quilt purchase, I think it's pretty tough to beat Loco Libre for quality, though there are several other great brands as well.
What kind of foot box do you have on your quilt.
 

twall13

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Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
1,953
Location
Utah
What kind of foot box do you have on your quilt.
Well, I own 4 quilts of various temperature ratings and have a mixed bag regarding the footboxes. I have a 10* Loco Libre quilt (really good to at least 0) and a DIY 25ish degree quilt that both have sewn footboxes. I have a 30* Hammock Gear and a 45* Wilderness Logics quilt that both have snap/cinch cord footboxes. I prefer the sewn footboxes for cold weather quilts. The snap/cinch closure is really nice on the lighter quilts to open and use as a blanket or vent, etc. when it's not so cold out. I just find in cold weather I have to stuff a sweatshirt in the bottom and/or zip my puffy around the footbox if it isn't a sewn footbox and I don't want to mess with that in cold weather. Some people don't mind dealing with that and like the versatility of being able to open them up but for me, when it's cold I don't want to mess with it. For me, any quilt below 30* rating will always have a sewn footbox.

The "hot box" footbox on the Loco Libre quilt is the best I've ever used for keeping my feet warm in cold weather. It adds insulation and opens it up so my large feet don't compress the down. Last week I spent a night in my hammock where it was 4* when I went to bed and got to a low of 2* overnight. No extra insulation for my feet other than a light pair of wool socks and my feet never got cold that night.

Most of the legit quilt makers are going to have accurate comfort ratings for their quilts, same for the high end mummy bags you mentioned. I've pushed the limits on all of my quilts and know where I can take them to, and it's typically a bit beyond their ratings. That said, if you are in the cold with a quilt you have to have other things dialed in (warm pad, a way to keep your head and neck warm without a hooded bag, etc.). It's not that difficult to do, it's just a bit different from a bag.
 
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Millwood21

Millwood21

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2020
Messages
26
Location
NE Georgia
Well, I own 4 quilts of various temperature ratings and have a mixed bag regarding the footboxes. I have a 10* Loco Libre quilt (really good to at least 0) and a DIY 25ish degree quilt that both have sewn footboxes. I have a 30* Hammock Gear and a 45* Wilderness Logics quilt that both have snap/cinch cord footboxes. I prefer the sewn footboxes for cold weather quilts. The snap/cinch closure is really nice on the lighter quilts to open and use as a blanket or vent, etc. when it's not so cold out. I just find in cold weather I have to stuff a sweatshirt in the bottom and/or zip my puffy around the footbox if it isn't a sewn footbox and I don't want to mess with that in cold weather. Some people don't mind dealing with that and like the versatility of being able to open them up but for me, when it's cold I don't want to mess with it. For me, any quilt below 30* rating will always have a sewn footbox.

The "hot box" footbox on the Loco Libre quilt is the best I've ever used for keeping my feet warm in cold weather. It adds insulation and opens it up so my large feet don't compress the down. Last week I spent a night in my hammock where it was 4* when I went to bed and got to a low of 2* overnight. No extra insulation for my feet other than a light pair of wool socks and my feet never got cold that night.

Most of the legit quilt makers are going to have accurate comfort ratings for their quilts, same for the high end mummy bags you mentioned. I've pushed the limits on all of my quilts and know where I can take them to, and it's typically a bit beyond their ratings. That said, if you are in the cold with a quilt you have to have other things dialed in (warm pad, a way to keep your head and neck warm without a hooded bag, etc.). It's not that difficult to do, it's just a bit different from a bag.

I may just have to get one and try it out. Ended up going with a SO Cimmaron for a shelter. So I’ll deff be sleeping on the ground.
 
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