Sous vide

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I ended up ordering this one, trying to keep it simple was part of my decision making, I read some shitty reviews re: Connectability with Wi-Fi or Bluetooth on the other ones discussed here. 2 year warranty



On guys doing a roast or anything really, how do you know how long to run it?
There are a ton of recipes online. I look there. They give guidelines for temp and time for anything you could think to cook.


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PantherCity

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On guys doing a roast or anything really, how do you know how long to run it?
For a 1" thick steak or a something that size, that doesn't have connective tissue you are trying to break down, an hour should do it, but 2 wouldn't hurt it. For an average top round off a whitetail, maybe as little as 3 hrs, but if you went 5 or 6hr it would still be fine. That is the glory of the thing.

If you are trying to break down connective tissue or make a tender rack of ribs, you could be going as long as 8-24-48hrs. It just depends on what what cut, what you are trying to achieve and the temp.

There are lots of online resources that you can find through google, one you experiment and do a few different things you will get the hang of it.

PRO TIP: Before searing the meat, DRY IT, I like to use a hot cast iron, but the surface needs to be dry to get a good sear. If you take a drippy peice of meat and throw it on a hot pan you are basically going to steam it unitl the moisture is gone and then it will start to sear. After the sous vide, our meat is already perfectly cooked so we are just trying to add a sear as quickly as possible, without cooking it anymore.

PRO TIP 2: I also always season and add butter/fat to the bag before the cook. Save the juice/drippings from the bag and you got the start of a great pan sauce after you sear the meat.
 
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Travis Bertrand

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Panther has some good tips.

I have to add you NEED to do research. Download an anova app as they have guidelines. There is a minimum and maximum. Bacteria lives and dies at certain temperatures for certain amount of time. That’s why you can cook chicken at 148 in a sous vide. That’s also why you can’t cook a steak longer than 3? Hours or so at 129.


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Matt Cashell

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PRO TIP 2: I also always season and add butter/fat to the bag before the cook. Save the juice/drippings from the bag and you got the start of a great pan sauce after you sear the meat.
Try cooking without the butter. Butter is over 50% water and can dilute the seasonings. You may end up with more to start your sauce with, but you will also be giving up some flavor.

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PantherCity

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Try cooking without the butter. Butter is over 50% water and can dilute the seasonings. You may end up with more to start your sauce with, but you will also be giving up some flavor.

.

This is not correct, real butter is ~15% water. You may be thinking about some spreadable abomination that is made of soybean oils and water.

Edit: I had to look it up, USDA regulates a minimum butterfat content of 80% the remainder is made up of moisture (water) milk-fat solids and maybe salt.
 
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Matt Cashell

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This is not correct, real butter is ~15% water. You may be thinking about some spreadable abomination that is made of soybean oils and water.
Of course. My mistake.

Still, the liquidization of the butter will dilute the seasoning and pull flavor from the meat. I read it has something to do with fat-soluable compounds.

I used to add butter (real butter btw) and now don’t. I tried it both ways during the same cook with elk steaks a while back and found the difference to be pretty stark.

I still do use butter during the sear though!

Anyway, just something to try. YMMV.
 

PantherCity

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Of course. My mistake.

Still, the liquidization of the butter will dilute the seasoning and pull flavor from the meat. I read it has something to do with fat-soluable compounds.

I used to add butter (real butter btw) and now don’t. I tried it both ways during the same cook with elk steaks a while back and found the difference to be pretty stark.

I still do use butter during the sear though!

Anyway, just something to try. YMMV.

Fair enough, I can't argue with experience. I always used it just because I've seen great chefs cook a steak in a pan and they use a shit ton of butter though out the cook.

I'll try it with out any fat next time and see how I like it.
 
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I sear with a propane torch. It’s fast. It’s clean. It doesn’t screw up my cast iron. And who doesn’t like playing with a torch?
 

woodbird

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I’ve got to get one of these. I’ve read about them on forums for years but finally ate something cooked with one last week.
 

Downeaster

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I got the Anova with wifi and bt this year. I will say i never use that stuff and dont see that ever changing. I guess im old fashioned but i just like to spin the wheel to the temp i want and be done. Point of all this is when im speaking with people that are interested but not sure if they wanna spend over $100 for something like this, I assure them that unless you are tech crazy, a basic model would do just as well. YMMV
 

Tod osier

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Agreed on the Bluetooth/WiFi for that purpose. I could see the tech for a grill, smoker or even crockpot, but for sousvide I’ve never wanted it.

Love the sous vide, though. Have a roast in right now that I’ll sear to finish, Cut and serve with a slice of chipotle-lemon zest butter on top along with a pile of roasted brussel sprouts.
 
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