To Loctite or not to Loctite

wyosteve

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I don't use Loctite, but instead use clear fingernail polish. Helps the screws hold, but is easy to break loose if you need to.
 
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archp625

archp625

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Thanks for the advice. I just read both ways are appropriate. I've never had a rail or base get loose with no loctite but was curious what the norm is now.
 

ericF

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Oct 4, 2016
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CO
The Wheeler scope mounting kits come with Purple loctite and looking at the spec sheet it seems designed for smaller screws while blue says 1/4" and up. I've used the purple because that is what came with the scope mounting kit, but a lot of people seem to use Blue and have no problems. Either way, don't over tighten especially if you do use a thread locker.
 

ChrisAU

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I was a loctite always guy until a forum convinced me it wasn't needed last summer. Then, on my last range trip before my October elk hunt I discovered my rings were loose at the base. Was panic inducing 4 days before leaving for my 2nd ever elk hunt. Loctited them and then marked them with reference marks with fingernail polish, took the bull in my avatar, and a few whitetail since then. I use purple loctite, and now always will.
 

Apollo117

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Jan 22, 2018
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I can't see how blue loctite would be detrimental. Only beneficial. I use it on every screw I can. A small tube costs around $5 and lasts for years.
 

SDHNTR

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Aug 30, 2012
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I use blue on all my scopes and dozens I’ve installed for family and friends. I’ve NEVER had a scope mounting system come loose. I don’t care what manufacturers say, I’m using it. Necessary or not, it gives me additional confidence.
 
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archp625

archp625

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Thanks guys, You talked me into it. I picked up some blue Loctite during my lunch break just in case this was the majority of the answers. I have the bottoms of the Hawkins Hybrids mounted but will remove and add a dot of blue Loctite.
 

Crowmangler

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Aug 4, 2019
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North Carolina
Why would you not use it? Think about the time, effort & money spend for a hunt trip. ChrisAU's story is a perfect example of why to use it. Just imagine if he missed that bull because of it.
 

ChrisAU

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Why would you not use it? Think about the time, effort & money spend for a hunt trip. ChrisAU's story is a perfect example of why to use it. Just imagine if he missed that bull because of it.
I actually shot a nice group at 400 at the last range trip, went home, and noticed a clicking sound as I picked up my rifle to put it in the safe. Only thing I can guess is they had all been working loose and the last one holding the scope steady gave up on my last shot that day. I had shot a ton in the months prior. Terrifying to think how badly my hunt could have been if I had found it then. And before mounting my scope the screws and holes had been degreased and I torqued the bases to 28 in/lbs exactly. After that they got taken apart again I went with gobs of purple loctite, 35 in/lbs, and the mentioned fingernail polish markers.

Here is a video, it was Oct 1 when I took it. Killed that Bull on Oct 15th, 9 days after leaving Alabama on the 6th. Pure nightmare stuff for me as a meticulous gear head.


I will never, ever, ever again not use loctite.

Here is great thread from @Formidilosus on mounting scopes:

 

muddydogs

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May 3, 2017
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Utah
My personal opinion is all Loctite does is make the screw hard to remove and depending on the type of head it has easy to strip. Them small Allen head screws sure like to strip out when applying enough force to break the Loctite free. I think the best option is a good inch pound torque wrench so you know what the mounts are torqued to and checked tightness as often as you want. Trick is not to torque the screw down then just keep re-torquing it as this will just keep making it tighter but instead loosen the screw just a quarter turn then re torque it when checking the mounts. In the last 5 years since owning a torque wrench and not using Loctite I have yet to find any screw on a scope mount loose, when testing this idea I would re torque the screws to see if they moved at all then back them off and torque again.
 

bmelton22

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Jan 10, 2020
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One more vote for the purple locktite that comes with the Wheeler kits. Worked great for us on many rifles.
 
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archp625

archp625

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St. Joseph, Missouri
My personal opinion is all Loctite does is make the screw hard to remove and depending on the type of head it has easy to strip. Them small Allen head screws sure like to strip out when applying enough force to break the Loctite free. I think the best option is a good inch pound torque wrench so you know what the mounts are torqued to and checked tightness as often as you want. Trick is not to torque the screw down then just keep re-torquing it as this will just keep making it tighter but instead loosen the screw just a quarter turn then re torque it when checking the mounts. In the last 5 years since owning a torque wrench and not using Loctite I have yet to find any screw on a scope mount loose, when testing this idea I would re torque the screws to see if they moved at all then back them off and torque again.
I have a torque wrench. I will add a dot of blue Loctite and apply 15 inch lbs of torque to each. I think I will be golden then.
 

Top147

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Apr 1, 2013
Messages
110
Loctite does not change torque specs so I would not worry about it. So torque to dry spec.

And remember more is better and too much is best.
 

Trigger06

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Jun 16, 2017
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Engineer hat on - The only thing it can hurt is making it easier to apply to much preload to the bolt (and too much preload can snap the bolt). As torque is applied to a bolt, the bolt exerts a clamping load (preload). The clamping load is what holds everything together. Lubricating the threads will reduce the amount of torque required to reach a given preload, meaning that if you apply the same torque to a lubricated bolt and a non-lubricated bolt, you'll end up with more preload on the lubricated bolt. Long story short, threadlocker is a good thing to use, but if it is used, it's best to stay on the bottom end of a torque specification. Engineer hat off.
 
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Motown

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Dec 11, 2019
Messages
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One thing to always remember as well is to degrease everything prior to using the loctite. Without degreasing it can still come lose over time even if using loctite.
 

muddydogs

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May 3, 2017
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Utah
I have a torque wrench. I will add a dot of blue Loctite and apply 15 inch lbs of torque to each. I think I will be golden then.
15 inch pounds is to light for base mount screws and ring mount screws. Most should be torqued to 25 or 30 inch pounds. Ring half screws are usually spec'ed at 15 to 18 inch pounds and action screws anywhere from 25 to 65 inch pounds depending on if the action is bedded or not and manufacture of stock.
 
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