Dehydrators

2ski

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Reading through the threads about dehydrating meals for camping as well as the fact that I'm a huge fan of some dehydrated fruits from the local co-op has got me thinking about a dehydrator. I figure its way cheaper than paying $10/lb for the stuff at the store. What are you guys using for dehydrators? Should I go with the cheaper ones and plan on rotating? Or is it worth a little extra and go for a L'equip or Excaliber or something? I have to say, I'm a little intriged at the ablity to make yogurt in one of the horizontal ones.

Also, another use for the dehydrator I was pondering...tea. Does anyone dehydrate stuff for tea to take into the backcountry? What do you use? I'm a big fan of tea. That way its not just always plain water drinking while camping. I can easily find rose hips right around Bozeman, and I remember from high school that you can get a ton on vit. c from rose hips. So dehydrating those to put in a little bag to throw into some boiling water for tea was a thought. Any other ideas? I can find oregon grapes and chokecherries pretty easily, but I'm not sure how that would taste. Are there any plants you look for while you're out in the woods that you throw into a pot to make tea?
 

Mckinnon

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I asked this question a couple weeks ago and everyone told me to get an excalibur, I think the thread is under general discussion. I have never done anything like that with the tea, sounds like a good idea, mebe sassafras, or lemon grass if you have any around....?
 

Lawnboi

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Definetly get a horizontal one. They dry evenly, no need to flip trays around.

I have an excalibur one and its nice, iv had others. I can tell you the excalibur trays are going to last a whole lot longer than the cheap round ones.
 

MTbowhunter36

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NW MT
Also, another use for the dehydrator I was pondering...tea. Does anyone dehydrate stuff for tea to take into the backcountry? What do you use? I'm a big fan of tea. That way its not just always plain water drinking while camping. I can easily find rose hips right around Bozeman, and I remember from high school that you can get a ton on vit. c from rose hips. So dehydrating those to put in a little bag to throw into some boiling water for tea was a thought. Any other ideas? I can find oregon grapes and chokecherries pretty easily, but I'm not sure how that would taste. Are there any plants you look for while you're out in the woods that you throw into a pot to make tea?[/QUOTE]

You can use the needles from spruce trees. I had a cold during archery season last year and used spruce needles for tea. My hunting buddy said he saw Bear Grylls do this on his show for Vit. C. Worked pretty well and tasted pretty good too.

We have used the cheap round dehydrator and have used the heck out of it. Just got done making a batch of elk jerky. It works pretty well, and am interested in dehydrating my own food this year rather than Mountain House.
 

HellsCanyon

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If using spruce or pine needles, make sure and use the current growth year needles. They are much higher in vitamin c and taste better!
 

aron

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North Dakota
I have a cabelas dehydrator and it works great except I don't like the idea of it using the trays as basically the front door but I have been happy with it and cooks evenly. Make sure to get one with a fan to distribute the heat. If I was to do it again, I would get an excalibur.
 

gulicemo

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FYI Excalibur 4 tray dehydrator on sale at Cabelas for $140. Regularly $200.
 

Hunt'nFish

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Beaverton, Oregon
I've been using a GardenMaster by American Harvest for about 15yrs.
Fruit, jerkey (w/ liquid smoke), leather, dried meals, etc. Good stuff.
For a vertical dryer, it dries very evenly. I run the first tray empty and I'll stack them 6 trays high.
Hunt'nFish

PS: Check out the book "Lip Smackin Backpackin" for great trails meals & de-hydrated recipes.
Also, their is a Foodsaver vac bag w/ an expandable flat bottom & zip-lock
that I use for making my own dried meals.
I can vac it down for space saving and then cut it open, pour water in & zip closed to hydrate.
Eat right out of the bag too. I'm sure others here do the same.
 
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Ramcam

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Dec 29, 2012
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British Columbia
Just bought a Nesco Pro FD- 75A Dehydrator off Amazon for $49.00 it's now $59.00 made a batch of Duck jerky turned out excellent.If you read up on this you will find many rate it higher than the expensive models.
 
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2ski

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So the Excal. website has the 4 tray for $129. I wonder if it would be worth it to jump up to the 5 tray for $199 or if the 4 would be enough. Is one more tray worth $70? And what are you gaining in performance?
 

Ray

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Oct 5, 2012
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Alaska
The number of trays is not as important as having an adjustable thermostat and a timer. The smaller and cheaper units do not have a timer. Without that you will need to babysit it. they may not go as hot either.

I have 3526TB for $250ish from amazon.

I find that 5 trays works for most needs. If I lived in farm country and had access to lots of cheap veggies then a 9 tray would be the choice.
 
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